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Original sin, the Fall, and epistemic self-trust

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Original sin, the Fall, and epistemic self-trust. / Rutledge, Jonathan Curtis.

In: Theologica: An International Journal for Philosophy of Religion and Philosophical Theology, Vol. 2, No. 1, 27.03.2018, p. 84-94.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Harvard

Rutledge, JC 2018, 'Original sin, the Fall, and epistemic self-trust', Theologica: An International Journal for Philosophy of Religion and Philosophical Theology, vol. 2, no. 1, pp. 84-94. https://doi.org/10.14428/thl.v0i0.1303

APA

Rutledge, J. C. (2018). Original sin, the Fall, and epistemic self-trust. Theologica: An International Journal for Philosophy of Religion and Philosophical Theology, 2(1), 84-94. https://doi.org/10.14428/thl.v0i0.1303

Vancouver

Rutledge JC. Original sin, the Fall, and epistemic self-trust. Theologica: An International Journal for Philosophy of Religion and Philosophical Theology. 2018 Mar 27;2(1):84-94. https://doi.org/10.14428/thl.v0i0.1303

Author

Rutledge, Jonathan Curtis. / Original sin, the Fall, and epistemic self-trust. In: Theologica: An International Journal for Philosophy of Religion and Philosophical Theology. 2018 ; Vol. 2, No. 1. pp. 84-94.

Bibtex - Download

@article{98edc61a42e640d3804dec6af6c5ed50,
title = "Original sin, the Fall, and epistemic self-trust",
abstract = "In this paper, I argue that no strong doctrine of the Fall can undermine the propriety of epistemic self-trust. My argument proceeds by introducing a common type of philosophical methodology, known as reflective equilibrium. After a brief exposition of the method, I introduce a puzzle for someone engaged in the project of self-reflection after gaining a reason to distrust their epistemic selves on the basis of a construal of a doctrine of the Fall. I close by introducing the worry as a formal argument and demonstrate the self-undermining nature of such an argument.",
keywords = "Original sin, Epistemic self-trust, Trust, Self-defeat, Rationality, Epistemic rationality, Analytic theology, The Fall, Noetic Effects of Sin",
author = "Rutledge, {Jonathan Curtis}",
year = "2018",
month = mar,
day = "27",
doi = "10.14428/thl.v0i0.1303",
language = "English",
volume = "2",
pages = "84--94",
journal = "Theologica: An International Journal for Philosophy of Religion and Philosophical Theology",
issn = "2593-0265",
publisher = "Catholic University of Louvain",
number = "1",

}

RIS (suitable for import to EndNote) - Download

TY - JOUR

T1 - Original sin, the Fall, and epistemic self-trust

AU - Rutledge, Jonathan Curtis

PY - 2018/3/27

Y1 - 2018/3/27

N2 - In this paper, I argue that no strong doctrine of the Fall can undermine the propriety of epistemic self-trust. My argument proceeds by introducing a common type of philosophical methodology, known as reflective equilibrium. After a brief exposition of the method, I introduce a puzzle for someone engaged in the project of self-reflection after gaining a reason to distrust their epistemic selves on the basis of a construal of a doctrine of the Fall. I close by introducing the worry as a formal argument and demonstrate the self-undermining nature of such an argument.

AB - In this paper, I argue that no strong doctrine of the Fall can undermine the propriety of epistemic self-trust. My argument proceeds by introducing a common type of philosophical methodology, known as reflective equilibrium. After a brief exposition of the method, I introduce a puzzle for someone engaged in the project of self-reflection after gaining a reason to distrust their epistemic selves on the basis of a construal of a doctrine of the Fall. I close by introducing the worry as a formal argument and demonstrate the self-undermining nature of such an argument.

KW - Original sin

KW - Epistemic self-trust

KW - Trust

KW - Self-defeat

KW - Rationality

KW - Epistemic rationality

KW - Analytic theology

KW - The Fall

KW - Noetic Effects of Sin

U2 - 10.14428/thl.v0i0.1303

DO - 10.14428/thl.v0i0.1303

M3 - Article

VL - 2

SP - 84

EP - 94

JO - Theologica: An International Journal for Philosophy of Religion and Philosophical Theology

JF - Theologica: An International Journal for Philosophy of Religion and Philosophical Theology

SN - 2593-0265

IS - 1

ER -

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