Skip to content

Research at St Andrews

Paralogs of Atlantic salmon myoblast determination factor genes are distinctly regulated in proliferating and differentiating myogenic cells

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Standard

Paralogs of Atlantic salmon myoblast determination factor genes are distinctly regulated in proliferating and differentiating myogenic cells. / Bower, Neil I.; Johnston, Ian A.

In: American Journal of Physiology. Regulatory, Integrative and Comparative Physiology, Vol. 298, No. 6, 06.2010, p. 1615-1626.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Harvard

Bower, NI & Johnston, IA 2010, 'Paralogs of Atlantic salmon myoblast determination factor genes are distinctly regulated in proliferating and differentiating myogenic cells', American Journal of Physiology. Regulatory, Integrative and Comparative Physiology, vol. 298, no. 6, pp. 1615-1626. https://doi.org/10.1152/ajpregu.00114.2010

APA

Bower, N. I., & Johnston, I. A. (2010). Paralogs of Atlantic salmon myoblast determination factor genes are distinctly regulated in proliferating and differentiating myogenic cells. American Journal of Physiology. Regulatory, Integrative and Comparative Physiology, 298(6), 1615-1626. https://doi.org/10.1152/ajpregu.00114.2010

Vancouver

Bower NI, Johnston IA. Paralogs of Atlantic salmon myoblast determination factor genes are distinctly regulated in proliferating and differentiating myogenic cells. American Journal of Physiology. Regulatory, Integrative and Comparative Physiology. 2010 Jun;298(6):1615-1626. https://doi.org/10.1152/ajpregu.00114.2010

Author

Bower, Neil I. ; Johnston, Ian A. / Paralogs of Atlantic salmon myoblast determination factor genes are distinctly regulated in proliferating and differentiating myogenic cells. In: American Journal of Physiology. Regulatory, Integrative and Comparative Physiology. 2010 ; Vol. 298, No. 6. pp. 1615-1626.

Bibtex - Download

@article{a9f3fc79a4854b218008f68a3b53f41f,
title = "Paralogs of Atlantic salmon myoblast determination factor genes are distinctly regulated in proliferating and differentiating myogenic cells",
abstract = "Bower NI, Johnston IA. Paralogs of Atlantic salmon myoblast determination factor genes are distinctly regulated in proliferating and differentiating myogenic cells. Am J Physiol Regul Integr Comp Physiol 298: R1615-R1626, 2010. First published April 7, 2010; doi:10.1152/ajpregu.00114.2010.-The mRNA expression of myogenic regulatory factors, including myoD1 (myoblast determination factor) gene paralogs, and their regulation by amino acids and insulin-like growth factors were investigated in primary cell cultures isolated from fast myotomal muscle of Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar). The cell cycle and S phase were determined as 28.1 and 13.3 h, respectively, at 18 degrees C. Expression of myoD1b and myoD1c peaked at 8 days of culture in the initial proliferation phase and then declined more than sixfold as cells differentiated and was correlated with PCNA (proliferating cell nuclear antigen) expression (R = 0.88, P < 0.0001; R = 0.70, P < 0.0001). In contrast, myoD1a transcripts increased from 2 to 8 days and remained at elevated levels as myotubes were formed. mRNA levels of myoD1c were, on average, 3.1- and 5.7-fold higher than myoD1a and myoD1b, respectively. Depriving cells of amino acids and serum led to a rapid increase in pax7 and a decrease in myoD1c and PCNA expression, indicating a transition to a quiescent state. In contrast, amino acid replacement in starved cells produced significant increases in myoD1c (at 6 h), PCNA (at 12 h), and myoD1b (at 24 h) and decreases in pax7 expression as cells entered the cell cycle. Our results are consistent with temporally distinct patterns of myoD1c and myoD1b expression at the G1 and S/G2 phases of the cell cycle. Treatment of starved cells with insulin-like growth factor I or II did not alter expression of the myoD paralogs. It was concluded that, in vitro, amino acids alone are sufficient to stimulate expression of genes regulating myogenesis in myoblasts involving autocrine/paracrine pathways. The differential responses of myoD paralogs during myotube maturation and amino acid treatments suggest that myoD1b and myoD1c are primarily expressed in proliferating cells and myoD1a in differentiating cells, providing evidence for their subfunctionalization following whole genome and local duplications in the Atlantic salmon lineage.",
keywords = "myoblast, myogenesis, cell cycle, amino acid stimulation, genome duplication, subfunctionalization, myoD, MUSCLE SATELLITE CELLS, SKELETAL-MUSCLE, GROWTH-FACTOR, TRANSCRIPTIONAL CONTROL, EARLY EXPRESSION, PRECURSOR CELLS, SELF-RENEWAL, TELEOST FISH, SALAR L., MYOD",
author = "Bower, {Neil I.} and Johnston, {Ian A.}",
year = "2010",
month = "6",
doi = "10.1152/ajpregu.00114.2010",
language = "English",
volume = "298",
pages = "1615--1626",
journal = "American Journal of Physiology. Regulatory, Integrative and Comparative Physiology",
issn = "0363-6119",
publisher = "American Physiological Society",
number = "6",

}

RIS (suitable for import to EndNote) - Download

TY - JOUR

T1 - Paralogs of Atlantic salmon myoblast determination factor genes are distinctly regulated in proliferating and differentiating myogenic cells

AU - Bower, Neil I.

AU - Johnston, Ian A.

PY - 2010/6

Y1 - 2010/6

N2 - Bower NI, Johnston IA. Paralogs of Atlantic salmon myoblast determination factor genes are distinctly regulated in proliferating and differentiating myogenic cells. Am J Physiol Regul Integr Comp Physiol 298: R1615-R1626, 2010. First published April 7, 2010; doi:10.1152/ajpregu.00114.2010.-The mRNA expression of myogenic regulatory factors, including myoD1 (myoblast determination factor) gene paralogs, and their regulation by amino acids and insulin-like growth factors were investigated in primary cell cultures isolated from fast myotomal muscle of Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar). The cell cycle and S phase were determined as 28.1 and 13.3 h, respectively, at 18 degrees C. Expression of myoD1b and myoD1c peaked at 8 days of culture in the initial proliferation phase and then declined more than sixfold as cells differentiated and was correlated with PCNA (proliferating cell nuclear antigen) expression (R = 0.88, P < 0.0001; R = 0.70, P < 0.0001). In contrast, myoD1a transcripts increased from 2 to 8 days and remained at elevated levels as myotubes were formed. mRNA levels of myoD1c were, on average, 3.1- and 5.7-fold higher than myoD1a and myoD1b, respectively. Depriving cells of amino acids and serum led to a rapid increase in pax7 and a decrease in myoD1c and PCNA expression, indicating a transition to a quiescent state. In contrast, amino acid replacement in starved cells produced significant increases in myoD1c (at 6 h), PCNA (at 12 h), and myoD1b (at 24 h) and decreases in pax7 expression as cells entered the cell cycle. Our results are consistent with temporally distinct patterns of myoD1c and myoD1b expression at the G1 and S/G2 phases of the cell cycle. Treatment of starved cells with insulin-like growth factor I or II did not alter expression of the myoD paralogs. It was concluded that, in vitro, amino acids alone are sufficient to stimulate expression of genes regulating myogenesis in myoblasts involving autocrine/paracrine pathways. The differential responses of myoD paralogs during myotube maturation and amino acid treatments suggest that myoD1b and myoD1c are primarily expressed in proliferating cells and myoD1a in differentiating cells, providing evidence for their subfunctionalization following whole genome and local duplications in the Atlantic salmon lineage.

AB - Bower NI, Johnston IA. Paralogs of Atlantic salmon myoblast determination factor genes are distinctly regulated in proliferating and differentiating myogenic cells. Am J Physiol Regul Integr Comp Physiol 298: R1615-R1626, 2010. First published April 7, 2010; doi:10.1152/ajpregu.00114.2010.-The mRNA expression of myogenic regulatory factors, including myoD1 (myoblast determination factor) gene paralogs, and their regulation by amino acids and insulin-like growth factors were investigated in primary cell cultures isolated from fast myotomal muscle of Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar). The cell cycle and S phase were determined as 28.1 and 13.3 h, respectively, at 18 degrees C. Expression of myoD1b and myoD1c peaked at 8 days of culture in the initial proliferation phase and then declined more than sixfold as cells differentiated and was correlated with PCNA (proliferating cell nuclear antigen) expression (R = 0.88, P < 0.0001; R = 0.70, P < 0.0001). In contrast, myoD1a transcripts increased from 2 to 8 days and remained at elevated levels as myotubes were formed. mRNA levels of myoD1c were, on average, 3.1- and 5.7-fold higher than myoD1a and myoD1b, respectively. Depriving cells of amino acids and serum led to a rapid increase in pax7 and a decrease in myoD1c and PCNA expression, indicating a transition to a quiescent state. In contrast, amino acid replacement in starved cells produced significant increases in myoD1c (at 6 h), PCNA (at 12 h), and myoD1b (at 24 h) and decreases in pax7 expression as cells entered the cell cycle. Our results are consistent with temporally distinct patterns of myoD1c and myoD1b expression at the G1 and S/G2 phases of the cell cycle. Treatment of starved cells with insulin-like growth factor I or II did not alter expression of the myoD paralogs. It was concluded that, in vitro, amino acids alone are sufficient to stimulate expression of genes regulating myogenesis in myoblasts involving autocrine/paracrine pathways. The differential responses of myoD paralogs during myotube maturation and amino acid treatments suggest that myoD1b and myoD1c are primarily expressed in proliferating cells and myoD1a in differentiating cells, providing evidence for their subfunctionalization following whole genome and local duplications in the Atlantic salmon lineage.

KW - myoblast

KW - myogenesis

KW - cell cycle

KW - amino acid stimulation

KW - genome duplication

KW - subfunctionalization

KW - myoD

KW - MUSCLE SATELLITE CELLS

KW - SKELETAL-MUSCLE

KW - GROWTH-FACTOR

KW - TRANSCRIPTIONAL CONTROL

KW - EARLY EXPRESSION

KW - PRECURSOR CELLS

KW - SELF-RENEWAL

KW - TELEOST FISH

KW - SALAR L.

KW - MYOD

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=77952711248&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://ukpmc.ac.uk/abstract/MED/20375265

U2 - 10.1152/ajpregu.00114.2010

DO - 10.1152/ajpregu.00114.2010

M3 - Article

VL - 298

SP - 1615

EP - 1626

JO - American Journal of Physiology. Regulatory, Integrative and Comparative Physiology

JF - American Journal of Physiology. Regulatory, Integrative and Comparative Physiology

SN - 0363-6119

IS - 6

ER -

Related by author

  1. Influence of feed ration size on somatic and muscle growth in landlocked dwarf and farmed Atlantic salmon Salmo salar

    Andersen, Ø., Vieira, V., Dessen, J-E. & Johnston, I. A., Apr 2019, In : Journal of Fish Biology. 94, 4, p. 614-620 7 p.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

  2. Genomic tools and selective breeding in molluscs

    Hollenbeck, C. M. & Johnston, I. A., 18 Jul 2018, In : Frontiers in Genetics. 9, 15 p., 253.

    Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

  3. A collaborative European approach to accelerating translational marine science

    Brennecke, P., Ferrante, M., Johnston, I. A. & Smith, D., 5 Jul 2018, In : Journal of Marine Science and Engineering. 6, 3, 12 p., 81.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

  4. A workflow used to design low density SNP panels for parentage assignment and traceability in aquaculture species and its validation in Atlantic salmon

    Holman, L. E., Garcia de la Serrana, D., Onoufriou, A., Hillestad, B. & Johnston, I. A., 1 Jul 2017, In : Aquaculture. 476, p. 59-64 6 p.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Related by journal

  1. Development of an animal-borne blood sample collection device and its deployment for the determination of cardiovascular and stress hormones in phocid seals

    Takei, Y., Suzuki, I., Wong, M. K. S., Milne, R., Moss, S., Sato, K. & Hall, A., 6 Oct 2016, In : American Journal of Physiology. Regulatory, Integrative and Comparative Physiology. 311, 4, p. R788-R796 9 p.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

ID: 1728194

Top