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PASSIVE ACOUSTIC LOCALIZATION OF THE ATLANTIC BOTTLE-NOSED-DOLPHIN USING WHISTLES AND ECHOLOCATION CLICKS

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Standard

PASSIVE ACOUSTIC LOCALIZATION OF THE ATLANTIC BOTTLE-NOSED-DOLPHIN USING WHISTLES AND ECHOLOCATION CLICKS. / FREITAG, L E ; TYACK, P L .

In: Journal of the Acoustical Society of America, Vol. 93, No. 4, 04.1993, p. 2197-2205.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Harvard

FREITAG, LE & TYACK, PL 1993, 'PASSIVE ACOUSTIC LOCALIZATION OF THE ATLANTIC BOTTLE-NOSED-DOLPHIN USING WHISTLES AND ECHOLOCATION CLICKS', Journal of the Acoustical Society of America, vol. 93, no. 4, pp. 2197-2205.

APA

FREITAG, L. E., & TYACK, P. L. (1993). PASSIVE ACOUSTIC LOCALIZATION OF THE ATLANTIC BOTTLE-NOSED-DOLPHIN USING WHISTLES AND ECHOLOCATION CLICKS. Journal of the Acoustical Society of America, 93(4), 2197-2205.

Vancouver

FREITAG LE, TYACK PL. PASSIVE ACOUSTIC LOCALIZATION OF THE ATLANTIC BOTTLE-NOSED-DOLPHIN USING WHISTLES AND ECHOLOCATION CLICKS. Journal of the Acoustical Society of America. 1993 Apr;93(4):2197-2205.

Author

FREITAG, L E ; TYACK, P L . / PASSIVE ACOUSTIC LOCALIZATION OF THE ATLANTIC BOTTLE-NOSED-DOLPHIN USING WHISTLES AND ECHOLOCATION CLICKS. In: Journal of the Acoustical Society of America. 1993 ; Vol. 93, No. 4. pp. 2197-2205.

Bibtex - Download

@article{7bd7151796c645478007f3ecba3d947f,
title = "PASSIVE ACOUSTIC LOCALIZATION OF THE ATLANTIC BOTTLE-NOSED-DOLPHIN USING WHISTLES AND ECHOLOCATION CLICKS",
abstract = "A method for localization and tracking of calling marine mammals was tested under realistic field conditions that include noise, multipath, and arbitrarily located sensors. Experiments were performed in two locations using four and six hydrophones with captive Atlantic bottlenose dolphins (Tursiops truncatus). Acoustic signals from the animals were collected in the field using a digital acoustic data acquisition system. The data were then processed off-line to determine relative hydrophone positions and the animal locations. Accurate hydrophone position estimates are achieved by pinging sequentially from each hydrophone to all the others. A two-step least-squares algorithm is then used to determine sensor locations from the calibration data. Animal locations are determined by estimating the time differences of arrival of the dolphin signals at the different sensors. The peak of a matched filter output or the first cycle of the observed waveform is used to determine arrival time of an echolocation click. Cross correlation between hydrophones is used to determine inter-sensor time delays of whistles. Calculation of source location using the time difference of arrival measurements is done using a least-squares solution to minimize error. These preliminary experimental results based on a small set of data show that realistic trajectories for moving animals may be generated from consecutive location estimates.",
author = "FREITAG, {L E} and TYACK, {P L}",
year = "1993",
month = "4",
language = "English",
volume = "93",
pages = "2197--2205",
journal = "Journal of the Acoustical Society of America",
issn = "0001-4966",
publisher = "Acoustical Society of America",
number = "4",

}

RIS (suitable for import to EndNote) - Download

TY - JOUR

T1 - PASSIVE ACOUSTIC LOCALIZATION OF THE ATLANTIC BOTTLE-NOSED-DOLPHIN USING WHISTLES AND ECHOLOCATION CLICKS

AU - FREITAG, L E

AU - TYACK, P L

PY - 1993/4

Y1 - 1993/4

N2 - A method for localization and tracking of calling marine mammals was tested under realistic field conditions that include noise, multipath, and arbitrarily located sensors. Experiments were performed in two locations using four and six hydrophones with captive Atlantic bottlenose dolphins (Tursiops truncatus). Acoustic signals from the animals were collected in the field using a digital acoustic data acquisition system. The data were then processed off-line to determine relative hydrophone positions and the animal locations. Accurate hydrophone position estimates are achieved by pinging sequentially from each hydrophone to all the others. A two-step least-squares algorithm is then used to determine sensor locations from the calibration data. Animal locations are determined by estimating the time differences of arrival of the dolphin signals at the different sensors. The peak of a matched filter output or the first cycle of the observed waveform is used to determine arrival time of an echolocation click. Cross correlation between hydrophones is used to determine inter-sensor time delays of whistles. Calculation of source location using the time difference of arrival measurements is done using a least-squares solution to minimize error. These preliminary experimental results based on a small set of data show that realistic trajectories for moving animals may be generated from consecutive location estimates.

AB - A method for localization and tracking of calling marine mammals was tested under realistic field conditions that include noise, multipath, and arbitrarily located sensors. Experiments were performed in two locations using four and six hydrophones with captive Atlantic bottlenose dolphins (Tursiops truncatus). Acoustic signals from the animals were collected in the field using a digital acoustic data acquisition system. The data were then processed off-line to determine relative hydrophone positions and the animal locations. Accurate hydrophone position estimates are achieved by pinging sequentially from each hydrophone to all the others. A two-step least-squares algorithm is then used to determine sensor locations from the calibration data. Animal locations are determined by estimating the time differences of arrival of the dolphin signals at the different sensors. The peak of a matched filter output or the first cycle of the observed waveform is used to determine arrival time of an echolocation click. Cross correlation between hydrophones is used to determine inter-sensor time delays of whistles. Calculation of source location using the time difference of arrival measurements is done using a least-squares solution to minimize error. These preliminary experimental results based on a small set of data show that realistic trajectories for moving animals may be generated from consecutive location estimates.

M3 - Article

VL - 93

SP - 2197

EP - 2205

JO - Journal of the Acoustical Society of America

JF - Journal of the Acoustical Society of America

SN - 0001-4966

IS - 4

ER -

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ID: 20035311

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