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Performativity matters: economic description as a moral problem

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Standard

Performativity matters : economic description as a moral problem. / Roscoe, Philip John.

Enacting Dismal Science: New Perspectives on the Performativity of Economics. ed. / Ivan Boldyrev; Ekaterina Svetlova. PalgraveMacMillan, 2016. p. 131-150 (Perspectives from Social Economics).

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Harvard

Roscoe, PJ 2016, Performativity matters: economic description as a moral problem. in I Boldyrev & E Svetlova (eds), Enacting Dismal Science: New Perspectives on the Performativity of Economics. Perspectives from Social Economics, PalgraveMacMillan, pp. 131-150. https://doi.org/10.1057/978-1-137-48876-3_6

APA

Roscoe, P. J. (2016). Performativity matters: economic description as a moral problem. In I. Boldyrev, & E. Svetlova (Eds.), Enacting Dismal Science: New Perspectives on the Performativity of Economics (pp. 131-150). (Perspectives from Social Economics). PalgraveMacMillan. https://doi.org/10.1057/978-1-137-48876-3_6

Vancouver

Roscoe PJ. Performativity matters: economic description as a moral problem. In Boldyrev I, Svetlova E, editors, Enacting Dismal Science: New Perspectives on the Performativity of Economics. PalgraveMacMillan. 2016. p. 131-150. (Perspectives from Social Economics). https://doi.org/10.1057/978-1-137-48876-3_6

Author

Roscoe, Philip John. / Performativity matters : economic description as a moral problem. Enacting Dismal Science: New Perspectives on the Performativity of Economics. editor / Ivan Boldyrev ; Ekaterina Svetlova. PalgraveMacMillan, 2016. pp. 131-150 (Perspectives from Social Economics).

Bibtex - Download

@inbook{99d9e1eedf704de4a180c26451cb8545,
title = "Performativity matters: economic description as a moral problem",
abstract = "If performativity theory simply repeats that economists design markets, much of its radicalism is lost. Instead, researchers must consider the mechanisms by which economization transforms social arrangements. This chapter develops the argument that economic description constitutes aspects of the social as economic. Following Austin and Butler, I argue that such description has a performative force, and is therefore politically and ethically charged. I suggest that an understanding of economic description as performative explains how economics can at once constitute and claim authority over an object. The chapter explores how economic description transforms social relations. It connects performativity theory to existing critiques of economic relations, and suggests that performativity research can develop ethically rich narratives without losing theoretical or empirical rigour. Finally it urges performativity research to rediscover its radicalism in its ability to unseat the {\textquoteleft}metaphysical presumptions{\textquoteright} of economics. ",
author = "Roscoe, {Philip John}",
year = "2016",
month = aug,
day = "25",
doi = "10.1057/978-1-137-48876-3_6",
language = "English",
isbn = "978-1-137-49210-4",
series = "Perspectives from Social Economics",
publisher = "PalgraveMacMillan",
pages = "131--150",
editor = "Ivan Boldyrev and Ekaterina Svetlova",
booktitle = "Enacting Dismal Science",

}

RIS (suitable for import to EndNote) - Download

TY - CHAP

T1 - Performativity matters

T2 - economic description as a moral problem

AU - Roscoe, Philip John

PY - 2016/8/25

Y1 - 2016/8/25

N2 - If performativity theory simply repeats that economists design markets, much of its radicalism is lost. Instead, researchers must consider the mechanisms by which economization transforms social arrangements. This chapter develops the argument that economic description constitutes aspects of the social as economic. Following Austin and Butler, I argue that such description has a performative force, and is therefore politically and ethically charged. I suggest that an understanding of economic description as performative explains how economics can at once constitute and claim authority over an object. The chapter explores how economic description transforms social relations. It connects performativity theory to existing critiques of economic relations, and suggests that performativity research can develop ethically rich narratives without losing theoretical or empirical rigour. Finally it urges performativity research to rediscover its radicalism in its ability to unseat the ‘metaphysical presumptions’ of economics.

AB - If performativity theory simply repeats that economists design markets, much of its radicalism is lost. Instead, researchers must consider the mechanisms by which economization transforms social arrangements. This chapter develops the argument that economic description constitutes aspects of the social as economic. Following Austin and Butler, I argue that such description has a performative force, and is therefore politically and ethically charged. I suggest that an understanding of economic description as performative explains how economics can at once constitute and claim authority over an object. The chapter explores how economic description transforms social relations. It connects performativity theory to existing critiques of economic relations, and suggests that performativity research can develop ethically rich narratives without losing theoretical or empirical rigour. Finally it urges performativity research to rediscover its radicalism in its ability to unseat the ‘metaphysical presumptions’ of economics.

U2 - 10.1057/978-1-137-48876-3_6

DO - 10.1057/978-1-137-48876-3_6

M3 - Chapter

SN - 978-1-137-49210-4

SN - 978-1-349-69681-9

T3 - Perspectives from Social Economics

SP - 131

EP - 150

BT - Enacting Dismal Science

A2 - Boldyrev, Ivan

A2 - Svetlova, Ekaterina

PB - PalgraveMacMillan

ER -

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ID: 241103074

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