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Perirhinal cortex and the recognition of relative familiarity

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

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Perirhinal cortex and the recognition of relative familiarity. / Ameen-Ali, Kamar E.; Sivakumaran, Magali; Eacott, Madeline J.; O'Connor, Akira R.; Ainge, James A.; Easton, Alexander.

In: Neurobiology of Learning and Memory, Vol. 182, 107439, 07.2021.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Harvard

Ameen-Ali, KE, Sivakumaran, M, Eacott, MJ, O'Connor, AR, Ainge, JA & Easton, A 2021, 'Perirhinal cortex and the recognition of relative familiarity', Neurobiology of Learning and Memory, vol. 182, 107439. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.nlm.2021.107439

APA

Ameen-Ali, K. E., Sivakumaran, M., Eacott, M. J., O'Connor, A. R., Ainge, J. A., & Easton, A. (2021). Perirhinal cortex and the recognition of relative familiarity. Neurobiology of Learning and Memory, 182, [107439]. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.nlm.2021.107439

Vancouver

Ameen-Ali KE, Sivakumaran M, Eacott MJ, O'Connor AR, Ainge JA, Easton A. Perirhinal cortex and the recognition of relative familiarity. Neurobiology of Learning and Memory. 2021 Jul;182. 107439. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.nlm.2021.107439

Author

Ameen-Ali, Kamar E. ; Sivakumaran, Magali ; Eacott, Madeline J. ; O'Connor, Akira R. ; Ainge, James A. ; Easton, Alexander. / Perirhinal cortex and the recognition of relative familiarity. In: Neurobiology of Learning and Memory. 2021 ; Vol. 182.

Bibtex - Download

@article{824dccc65be64c0a87361999c3219c66,
title = "Perirhinal cortex and the recognition of relative familiarity",
abstract = "Spontaneous object recognition (SOR) is a widely used task of recognition memory in rodents which relies on their propensity to explore novel (or relatively novel) objects. Network models typically define perirhinal cortex as a region required for recognition of previously seen objects largely based on findings that lesions or inactivations of this area produce SOR deficits. However, relatively little is understood about the relationship between the activity of cells in the perirhinal cortex that signal novelty and familiarity and the behavioural responses of animals in the SOR task. Previous studies have used objects that are either highly familiar or absolutely novel, but everyday memory is for objects that sit on a spectrum of familiarity which includes objects that have been seen only a few times, or objects that are similar to objects which have been previously experienced. We present two studies that explore cellular activity (through c-fos imaging) within perirhinal cortex of rats performing SOR where the familiarity of objects has been manipulated. Despite robust recognition memory performance, we show no significant changes in perirhinal activity related to the level of familiarity of the objects. Reasons for this lack of familiarity-related modulation in perirhinal cortex activity are discussed. The current findings support emerging evidence that perirhinal responses to novelty are complex and that task demands are critical to the involvement of perirhinal cortex in the control of object recognition memory.",
keywords = "Recognition memory, Rat, Spontaneous object recogniton, cfos",
author = "Ameen-Ali, {Kamar E.} and Magali Sivakumaran and Eacott, {Madeline J.} and O'Connor, {Akira R.} and Ainge, {James A.} and Alexander Easton",
note = "This work was supported and funded by a National Centre for the Replacement, Refinement and Reduction of Animals in Research (NC3Rs) studentship to K.E.A.-A. (NC/K500252/1) and an Eastbio (BBSRC) studentship to M.G.H.",
year = "2021",
month = apr,
day = "14",
doi = "10.1016/j.nlm.2021.107439",
language = "English",
volume = "182",
journal = "Neurobiology of Learning and Memory",
issn = "1074-7427",
publisher = "Academic Press Inc.",

}

RIS (suitable for import to EndNote) - Download

TY - JOUR

T1 - Perirhinal cortex and the recognition of relative familiarity

AU - Ameen-Ali, Kamar E.

AU - Sivakumaran, Magali

AU - Eacott, Madeline J.

AU - O'Connor, Akira R.

AU - Ainge, James A.

AU - Easton, Alexander

N1 - This work was supported and funded by a National Centre for the Replacement, Refinement and Reduction of Animals in Research (NC3Rs) studentship to K.E.A.-A. (NC/K500252/1) and an Eastbio (BBSRC) studentship to M.G.H.

PY - 2021/4/14

Y1 - 2021/4/14

N2 - Spontaneous object recognition (SOR) is a widely used task of recognition memory in rodents which relies on their propensity to explore novel (or relatively novel) objects. Network models typically define perirhinal cortex as a region required for recognition of previously seen objects largely based on findings that lesions or inactivations of this area produce SOR deficits. However, relatively little is understood about the relationship between the activity of cells in the perirhinal cortex that signal novelty and familiarity and the behavioural responses of animals in the SOR task. Previous studies have used objects that are either highly familiar or absolutely novel, but everyday memory is for objects that sit on a spectrum of familiarity which includes objects that have been seen only a few times, or objects that are similar to objects which have been previously experienced. We present two studies that explore cellular activity (through c-fos imaging) within perirhinal cortex of rats performing SOR where the familiarity of objects has been manipulated. Despite robust recognition memory performance, we show no significant changes in perirhinal activity related to the level of familiarity of the objects. Reasons for this lack of familiarity-related modulation in perirhinal cortex activity are discussed. The current findings support emerging evidence that perirhinal responses to novelty are complex and that task demands are critical to the involvement of perirhinal cortex in the control of object recognition memory.

AB - Spontaneous object recognition (SOR) is a widely used task of recognition memory in rodents which relies on their propensity to explore novel (or relatively novel) objects. Network models typically define perirhinal cortex as a region required for recognition of previously seen objects largely based on findings that lesions or inactivations of this area produce SOR deficits. However, relatively little is understood about the relationship between the activity of cells in the perirhinal cortex that signal novelty and familiarity and the behavioural responses of animals in the SOR task. Previous studies have used objects that are either highly familiar or absolutely novel, but everyday memory is for objects that sit on a spectrum of familiarity which includes objects that have been seen only a few times, or objects that are similar to objects which have been previously experienced. We present two studies that explore cellular activity (through c-fos imaging) within perirhinal cortex of rats performing SOR where the familiarity of objects has been manipulated. Despite robust recognition memory performance, we show no significant changes in perirhinal activity related to the level of familiarity of the objects. Reasons for this lack of familiarity-related modulation in perirhinal cortex activity are discussed. The current findings support emerging evidence that perirhinal responses to novelty are complex and that task demands are critical to the involvement of perirhinal cortex in the control of object recognition memory.

KW - Recognition memory

KW - Rat

KW - Spontaneous object recogniton

KW - cfos

U2 - 10.1016/j.nlm.2021.107439

DO - 10.1016/j.nlm.2021.107439

M3 - Article

VL - 182

JO - Neurobiology of Learning and Memory

JF - Neurobiology of Learning and Memory

SN - 1074-7427

M1 - 107439

ER -

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