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Permian–Triassic mass extinction pulses driven by major marine carbon cycle perturbations

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Permian–Triassic mass extinction pulses driven by major marine carbon cycle perturbations. / Jurikova, Hana; Gutjahr, Marcus; Wallmann, Klaus; Flögel, Sascha; Liebetrau, Volker; Posenato, Renato; Angiolini, Lucia; Garbelli, Claudio; Brand, Uwe; Wiedenbeck, Michael; Eisenhauer, Anton.

In: Nature Geoscience, Vol. 13, 11.2020, p. 745–750.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Harvard

Jurikova, H, Gutjahr, M, Wallmann, K, Flögel, S, Liebetrau, V, Posenato, R, Angiolini, L, Garbelli, C, Brand, U, Wiedenbeck, M & Eisenhauer, A 2020, 'Permian–Triassic mass extinction pulses driven by major marine carbon cycle perturbations', Nature Geoscience, vol. 13, pp. 745–750. https://doi.org/10.1038/s41561-020-00646-4

APA

Jurikova, H., Gutjahr, M., Wallmann, K., Flögel, S., Liebetrau, V., Posenato, R., Angiolini, L., Garbelli, C., Brand, U., Wiedenbeck, M., & Eisenhauer, A. (2020). Permian–Triassic mass extinction pulses driven by major marine carbon cycle perturbations. Nature Geoscience, 13, 745–750. https://doi.org/10.1038/s41561-020-00646-4

Vancouver

Jurikova H, Gutjahr M, Wallmann K, Flögel S, Liebetrau V, Posenato R et al. Permian–Triassic mass extinction pulses driven by major marine carbon cycle perturbations. Nature Geoscience. 2020 Nov;13:745–750. https://doi.org/10.1038/s41561-020-00646-4

Author

Jurikova, Hana ; Gutjahr, Marcus ; Wallmann, Klaus ; Flögel, Sascha ; Liebetrau, Volker ; Posenato, Renato ; Angiolini, Lucia ; Garbelli, Claudio ; Brand, Uwe ; Wiedenbeck, Michael ; Eisenhauer, Anton. / Permian–Triassic mass extinction pulses driven by major marine carbon cycle perturbations. In: Nature Geoscience. 2020 ; Vol. 13. pp. 745–750.

Bibtex - Download

@article{dd1188da2acb44bab9f6fa8c7039945e,
title = "Permian–Triassic mass extinction pulses driven by major marine carbon cycle perturbations",
abstract = "The Permian/Triassic boundary approximately 251.9 million years ago marked the most severe environmental crisis identified in the geological record, which dictated the onwards course for the evolution of life. Magmatism from Siberian Traps is thought to have played an important role, but the causational trigger and its feedbacks are yet to be fully understood. Here we present a new boron-isotope-derived seawater pH record from fossil brachiopod shells deposited on the Tethys shelf that demonstrates a substantial decline in seawater pH coeval with the onset of the mass extinction in the latest Permian. Combined with carbon isotope data, our results are integrated in a geochemical model that resolves the carbon cycle dynamics as well as the ocean redox conditions and nitrogen isotope turnover. We find that the initial ocean acidification was intimately linked to a large pulse of carbon degassing from the Siberian sill intrusions. We unravel the consequences of the greenhouse effect on the marine environment, and show how elevated sea surface temperatures, export production and nutrient input driven by increased rates of chemical weathering gave rise to widespread deoxygenation and sporadic sulfide poisoning of the oceans in the earliest Triassic. Our findings enable us to assemble a consistent biogeochemical reconstruction of the mechanisms that resulted in the largest Phanerozoic mass extinction.",
keywords = "Carbon cycle, Marine chemistry, Paleoclimate",
author = "Hana Jurikova and Marcus Gutjahr and Klaus Wallmann and Sascha Fl{\"o}gel and Volker Liebetrau and Renato Posenato and Lucia Angiolini and Claudio Garbelli and Uwe Brand and Michael Wiedenbeck and Anton Eisenhauer",
note = "This project has received funding from the European Union{\textquoteright}s Horizon 2020 research and innovation programme under the Marie Sklodowska-Curie grant agreement no. 643084 (BASE-LiNE Earth). K.W. was supported by the HGF (ESM project) and S.F. by the DFG (SFB 754, subproject A7). L.A. and R.P. were supported by the MURST (PRIN 2017RX9XXXY, project {\textquoteleft}Biota resilience to global change: biomineralization of planktic and benthic calcifiers in the past, present and future{\textquoteright}).",
year = "2020",
month = nov,
doi = "10.1038/s41561-020-00646-4",
language = "English",
volume = "13",
pages = "745–750",
journal = "Nature Geoscience",
issn = "1752-0894",
publisher = "Nature publishing group",

}

RIS (suitable for import to EndNote) - Download

TY - JOUR

T1 - Permian–Triassic mass extinction pulses driven by major marine carbon cycle perturbations

AU - Jurikova, Hana

AU - Gutjahr, Marcus

AU - Wallmann, Klaus

AU - Flögel, Sascha

AU - Liebetrau, Volker

AU - Posenato, Renato

AU - Angiolini, Lucia

AU - Garbelli, Claudio

AU - Brand, Uwe

AU - Wiedenbeck, Michael

AU - Eisenhauer, Anton

N1 - This project has received funding from the European Union’s Horizon 2020 research and innovation programme under the Marie Sklodowska-Curie grant agreement no. 643084 (BASE-LiNE Earth). K.W. was supported by the HGF (ESM project) and S.F. by the DFG (SFB 754, subproject A7). L.A. and R.P. were supported by the MURST (PRIN 2017RX9XXXY, project ‘Biota resilience to global change: biomineralization of planktic and benthic calcifiers in the past, present and future’).

PY - 2020/11

Y1 - 2020/11

N2 - The Permian/Triassic boundary approximately 251.9 million years ago marked the most severe environmental crisis identified in the geological record, which dictated the onwards course for the evolution of life. Magmatism from Siberian Traps is thought to have played an important role, but the causational trigger and its feedbacks are yet to be fully understood. Here we present a new boron-isotope-derived seawater pH record from fossil brachiopod shells deposited on the Tethys shelf that demonstrates a substantial decline in seawater pH coeval with the onset of the mass extinction in the latest Permian. Combined with carbon isotope data, our results are integrated in a geochemical model that resolves the carbon cycle dynamics as well as the ocean redox conditions and nitrogen isotope turnover. We find that the initial ocean acidification was intimately linked to a large pulse of carbon degassing from the Siberian sill intrusions. We unravel the consequences of the greenhouse effect on the marine environment, and show how elevated sea surface temperatures, export production and nutrient input driven by increased rates of chemical weathering gave rise to widespread deoxygenation and sporadic sulfide poisoning of the oceans in the earliest Triassic. Our findings enable us to assemble a consistent biogeochemical reconstruction of the mechanisms that resulted in the largest Phanerozoic mass extinction.

AB - The Permian/Triassic boundary approximately 251.9 million years ago marked the most severe environmental crisis identified in the geological record, which dictated the onwards course for the evolution of life. Magmatism from Siberian Traps is thought to have played an important role, but the causational trigger and its feedbacks are yet to be fully understood. Here we present a new boron-isotope-derived seawater pH record from fossil brachiopod shells deposited on the Tethys shelf that demonstrates a substantial decline in seawater pH coeval with the onset of the mass extinction in the latest Permian. Combined with carbon isotope data, our results are integrated in a geochemical model that resolves the carbon cycle dynamics as well as the ocean redox conditions and nitrogen isotope turnover. We find that the initial ocean acidification was intimately linked to a large pulse of carbon degassing from the Siberian sill intrusions. We unravel the consequences of the greenhouse effect on the marine environment, and show how elevated sea surface temperatures, export production and nutrient input driven by increased rates of chemical weathering gave rise to widespread deoxygenation and sporadic sulfide poisoning of the oceans in the earliest Triassic. Our findings enable us to assemble a consistent biogeochemical reconstruction of the mechanisms that resulted in the largest Phanerozoic mass extinction.

KW - Carbon cycle

KW - Marine chemistry

KW - Paleoclimate

UR - https://rdcu.be/b8IWR

U2 - 10.1038/s41561-020-00646-4

DO - 10.1038/s41561-020-00646-4

M3 - Article

VL - 13

SP - 745

EP - 750

JO - Nature Geoscience

JF - Nature Geoscience

SN - 1752-0894

ER -

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