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Phenotype matching and early social conditions affect shoaling and exploration decisions

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Phenotype matching and early social conditions affect shoaling and exploration decisions. / Barbosa, Miguel; Camacho-Cervantes, Morelia; Ojanguren, Alfredo F.

In: Ethology, Vol. 122, No. 2, 02.2016, p. 171-179.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Harvard

Barbosa, M, Camacho-Cervantes, M & Ojanguren, AF 2016, 'Phenotype matching and early social conditions affect shoaling and exploration decisions' Ethology, vol. 122, no. 2, pp. 171-179. https://doi.org/10.1111/eth.12455

APA

Barbosa, M., Camacho-Cervantes, M., & Ojanguren, A. F. (2016). Phenotype matching and early social conditions affect shoaling and exploration decisions. Ethology, 122(2), 171-179. https://doi.org/10.1111/eth.12455

Vancouver

Barbosa M, Camacho-Cervantes M, Ojanguren AF. Phenotype matching and early social conditions affect shoaling and exploration decisions. Ethology. 2016 Feb;122(2):171-179. https://doi.org/10.1111/eth.12455

Author

Barbosa, Miguel ; Camacho-Cervantes, Morelia ; Ojanguren, Alfredo F. / Phenotype matching and early social conditions affect shoaling and exploration decisions. In: Ethology. 2016 ; Vol. 122, No. 2. pp. 171-179.

Bibtex - Download

@article{e261ac7b409b457c90a6661465727c39,
title = "Phenotype matching and early social conditions affect shoaling and exploration decisions",
abstract = "Early social conditions are vital for the establishment of future social interactions. Less, however, is known about how differences in early social conditions contribute to the process of individual recognition and subsequently in the decision of associating and exploring behaviours. In this study, we address this gap in the Trinidadian guppy Poecilia reticulata and test the prediction that fish would show a higher tendency to recognize and associate with individuals of similar phenotype. This prediction was tested by comparing the likelihood of association and latency to explore a novel area in males and females when in the presence of individuals that were familiar (reared together but from different populations), from the same population of origin (from the same population but deprived of interaction with each other), or were unfamiliar (different population and have never interacted). Both early social conditions and population of origin (phenotype matching) affected the tendency to shoal and explore. Females, but not males, exhibited identical preference to associate either with unfamiliar females as with familiar females from a different population. Importantly, female preference did not occur with unfamiliar individuals from a different population. In contrast with our prediction, tendency to shoal did not predict exploration propensity. Males always start exploration before the group whenever unfamiliar males composed the group. Females on the other hand only moved to the novel area after seeing the group doing so, revealing sexual dimorphism in exploratory behaviour. Our results provide evidence for a familiarity and phenotypic matching recognition mechanism at the population level and also highlight the importance of accounting for differences between sexes when investigating the effects of early social conditions.",
keywords = "Exploration, Familiarization, Ontogeny, Phenotypic matching, Shoaling",
author = "Miguel Barbosa and Morelia Camacho-Cervantes and Ojanguren, {Alfredo F.}",
note = "This study was funded by a postdoctoral fellowship to MB (SFRH/BPD/8225/2011).",
year = "2016",
month = "2",
doi = "10.1111/eth.12455",
language = "English",
volume = "122",
pages = "171--179",
journal = "Ethology",
issn = "0179-1613",
publisher = "Wiley-Blackwell",
number = "2",

}

RIS (suitable for import to EndNote) - Download

TY - JOUR

T1 - Phenotype matching and early social conditions affect shoaling and exploration decisions

AU - Barbosa, Miguel

AU - Camacho-Cervantes, Morelia

AU - Ojanguren, Alfredo F.

N1 - This study was funded by a postdoctoral fellowship to MB (SFRH/BPD/8225/2011).

PY - 2016/2

Y1 - 2016/2

N2 - Early social conditions are vital for the establishment of future social interactions. Less, however, is known about how differences in early social conditions contribute to the process of individual recognition and subsequently in the decision of associating and exploring behaviours. In this study, we address this gap in the Trinidadian guppy Poecilia reticulata and test the prediction that fish would show a higher tendency to recognize and associate with individuals of similar phenotype. This prediction was tested by comparing the likelihood of association and latency to explore a novel area in males and females when in the presence of individuals that were familiar (reared together but from different populations), from the same population of origin (from the same population but deprived of interaction with each other), or were unfamiliar (different population and have never interacted). Both early social conditions and population of origin (phenotype matching) affected the tendency to shoal and explore. Females, but not males, exhibited identical preference to associate either with unfamiliar females as with familiar females from a different population. Importantly, female preference did not occur with unfamiliar individuals from a different population. In contrast with our prediction, tendency to shoal did not predict exploration propensity. Males always start exploration before the group whenever unfamiliar males composed the group. Females on the other hand only moved to the novel area after seeing the group doing so, revealing sexual dimorphism in exploratory behaviour. Our results provide evidence for a familiarity and phenotypic matching recognition mechanism at the population level and also highlight the importance of accounting for differences between sexes when investigating the effects of early social conditions.

AB - Early social conditions are vital for the establishment of future social interactions. Less, however, is known about how differences in early social conditions contribute to the process of individual recognition and subsequently in the decision of associating and exploring behaviours. In this study, we address this gap in the Trinidadian guppy Poecilia reticulata and test the prediction that fish would show a higher tendency to recognize and associate with individuals of similar phenotype. This prediction was tested by comparing the likelihood of association and latency to explore a novel area in males and females when in the presence of individuals that were familiar (reared together but from different populations), from the same population of origin (from the same population but deprived of interaction with each other), or were unfamiliar (different population and have never interacted). Both early social conditions and population of origin (phenotype matching) affected the tendency to shoal and explore. Females, but not males, exhibited identical preference to associate either with unfamiliar females as with familiar females from a different population. Importantly, female preference did not occur with unfamiliar individuals from a different population. In contrast with our prediction, tendency to shoal did not predict exploration propensity. Males always start exploration before the group whenever unfamiliar males composed the group. Females on the other hand only moved to the novel area after seeing the group doing so, revealing sexual dimorphism in exploratory behaviour. Our results provide evidence for a familiarity and phenotypic matching recognition mechanism at the population level and also highlight the importance of accounting for differences between sexes when investigating the effects of early social conditions.

KW - Exploration

KW - Familiarization

KW - Ontogeny

KW - Phenotypic matching

KW - Shoaling

U2 - 10.1111/eth.12455

DO - 10.1111/eth.12455

M3 - Article

VL - 122

SP - 171

EP - 179

JO - Ethology

T2 - Ethology

JF - Ethology

SN - 0179-1613

IS - 2

ER -

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ID: 241163460