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Philosophy of the imagination: time, immanence and the events that wound us in Wilson Harris’s Jonestown

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

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Philosophy of the imagination : time, immanence and the events that wound us in Wilson Harris’s Jonestown . / Burns, Lorna Margaret.

In: Journal of Postcolonial Writing, Vol. 49, No. 2, 03.05.2013, p. 174–186.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Harvard

Burns, LM 2013, 'Philosophy of the imagination: time, immanence and the events that wound us in Wilson Harris’s Jonestown ', Journal of Postcolonial Writing, vol. 49, no. 2, pp. 174–186. https://doi.org/10.1080/17449855.2013.776378

APA

Burns, L. M. (2013). Philosophy of the imagination: time, immanence and the events that wound us in Wilson Harris’s Jonestown . Journal of Postcolonial Writing, 49(2), 174–186. https://doi.org/10.1080/17449855.2013.776378

Vancouver

Burns LM. Philosophy of the imagination: time, immanence and the events that wound us in Wilson Harris’s Jonestown . Journal of Postcolonial Writing. 2013 May 3;49(2):174–186. https://doi.org/10.1080/17449855.2013.776378

Author

Burns, Lorna Margaret. / Philosophy of the imagination : time, immanence and the events that wound us in Wilson Harris’s Jonestown . In: Journal of Postcolonial Writing. 2013 ; Vol. 49, No. 2. pp. 174–186.

Bibtex - Download

@article{0bb9272368ec495db2e360091b033886,
title = "Philosophy of the imagination: time, immanence and the events that wound us in Wilson Harris{\textquoteright}s Jonestown ",
abstract = "In his fictional recreation of the People{\textquoteright}s Temple massacre, Jonestown, Harris presents us with a protagonist who counter-actualizes the trauma that wounds him, living creatively out of the event and constructing an alternative present-future. Drawing on Deleuzian philosophy, this essay argues for a re-conceptualization of Jonestown in terms that evoke not only Deleuze{\textquoteright}s philosophy of time and immanence but also his distinction, via Nietzsche, between active and reactive forces. By means of a character (Francisco Bone) who embraces the power of transformation, creation and difference-in-itself, Harris demonstrates the value of active forces that do not depend on external recognition or dialectical negation in order to be for a postcolonial philosophy of the imagination.",
keywords = "Jonestown, Wilson Harris, Gilles Deleuze, the event, time, immanence",
author = "Burns, {Lorna Margaret}",
note = "This is a special issue of the Journal of Postcolonial Writing edited by Lorna Burns and Wendy Knepper",
year = "2013",
month = may,
day = "3",
doi = "10.1080/17449855.2013.776378",
language = "English",
volume = "49",
pages = "174–186",
journal = "Journal of Postcolonial Writing",
issn = "1744-9855",
publisher = "Routledge",
number = "2",

}

RIS (suitable for import to EndNote) - Download

TY - JOUR

T1 - Philosophy of the imagination

T2 - time, immanence and the events that wound us in Wilson Harris’s Jonestown

AU - Burns, Lorna Margaret

N1 - This is a special issue of the Journal of Postcolonial Writing edited by Lorna Burns and Wendy Knepper

PY - 2013/5/3

Y1 - 2013/5/3

N2 - In his fictional recreation of the People’s Temple massacre, Jonestown, Harris presents us with a protagonist who counter-actualizes the trauma that wounds him, living creatively out of the event and constructing an alternative present-future. Drawing on Deleuzian philosophy, this essay argues for a re-conceptualization of Jonestown in terms that evoke not only Deleuze’s philosophy of time and immanence but also his distinction, via Nietzsche, between active and reactive forces. By means of a character (Francisco Bone) who embraces the power of transformation, creation and difference-in-itself, Harris demonstrates the value of active forces that do not depend on external recognition or dialectical negation in order to be for a postcolonial philosophy of the imagination.

AB - In his fictional recreation of the People’s Temple massacre, Jonestown, Harris presents us with a protagonist who counter-actualizes the trauma that wounds him, living creatively out of the event and constructing an alternative present-future. Drawing on Deleuzian philosophy, this essay argues for a re-conceptualization of Jonestown in terms that evoke not only Deleuze’s philosophy of time and immanence but also his distinction, via Nietzsche, between active and reactive forces. By means of a character (Francisco Bone) who embraces the power of transformation, creation and difference-in-itself, Harris demonstrates the value of active forces that do not depend on external recognition or dialectical negation in order to be for a postcolonial philosophy of the imagination.

KW - Jonestown

KW - Wilson Harris

KW - Gilles Deleuze

KW - the event

KW - time

KW - immanence

U2 - 10.1080/17449855.2013.776378

DO - 10.1080/17449855.2013.776378

M3 - Article

VL - 49

SP - 174

EP - 186

JO - Journal of Postcolonial Writing

JF - Journal of Postcolonial Writing

SN - 1744-9855

IS - 2

ER -

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ID: 42538076

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