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Photoacclimation, growth and distribution of massive coral species in clear and turbid waters

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Photoacclimation, growth and distribution of massive coral species in clear and turbid waters. / Hennige, S.J.; Smith, D.J.; Perkins, R.; Consalvey, M; Paterson, David Maxwell; Suggett, D.J.

In: Marine Ecology Progress Series, Vol. 369, 13.10.2008, p. 77-88.

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Harvard

Hennige, SJ, Smith, DJ, Perkins, R, Consalvey, M, Paterson, DM & Suggett, DJ 2008, 'Photoacclimation, growth and distribution of massive coral species in clear and turbid waters' Marine Ecology Progress Series, vol. 369, pp. 77-88. https://doi.org/10.3354/meps07612

APA

Hennige, S. J., Smith, D. J., Perkins, R., Consalvey, M., Paterson, D. M., & Suggett, D. J. (2008). Photoacclimation, growth and distribution of massive coral species in clear and turbid waters. Marine Ecology Progress Series, 369, 77-88. https://doi.org/10.3354/meps07612

Vancouver

Hennige SJ, Smith DJ, Perkins R, Consalvey M, Paterson DM, Suggett DJ. Photoacclimation, growth and distribution of massive coral species in clear and turbid waters. Marine Ecology Progress Series. 2008 Oct 13;369:77-88. https://doi.org/10.3354/meps07612

Author

Hennige, S.J. ; Smith, D.J. ; Perkins, R. ; Consalvey, M ; Paterson, David Maxwell ; Suggett, D.J. / Photoacclimation, growth and distribution of massive coral species in clear and turbid waters. In: Marine Ecology Progress Series. 2008 ; Vol. 369. pp. 77-88.

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@article{c11a0e5e97264f948bf9b9a6f9835bd1,
title = "Photoacclimation, growth and distribution of massive coral species in clear and turbid waters",
abstract = "ABSTRACT: Massive coral species play a key role in coral reef ecosystems, adding significantly to physical integrity, long term stability and reef biodiversity. This study coupled the assessment of the distribution and abundance of 4 dominant massive coral species, Diploastrea heliopora, Favia speciosa, F. matthaii and Porites lutea, with investigations into species-specific photoacclimatory responses within the Wakatobi Marine National Park of southeast Sulawesi, Indonesia, to determine the potential of photoacclimation to be a driver of biological success. For this, rapid light curves using pulse amplitude modulated (PAM) chlorophyll a fluorescence techniques were employed with additional manipulations to circumvent differences of light quality and absorption between species and across environmental gradients. P. lutea was examined over a range of depths and sites to determine patterns of photoacclimation, and all 4 species were assessed at a single depth between sites for which long-term data for coral community structure and growth existed. Light availability was more highly constrained with depth than between sites; consequently, photoacclimation patterns for P. lutea appeared greater with depth than across environmental gradients. All 4 species were found to differentially modify the extent of non-photochemical quenching to maintain a constant photochemical operating efficiency (qP). Therefore, our results suggest that these massive corals photoacclimate to ensure a constant light-dependent rate of reduction of the plastoquinone pool across growth environments.",
keywords = "Chlorophyll a fluorescence, Zooxanthellae, PAM, Photoacclimation, Massive coral, Indo-Pacific, Shade-adapted colonies, Fast repetition rate, Measured in-situ, Stylophora-pistillata, Fluorescence measurements, Chlorophyll fluorescence, Photosynthetic activity, Community structure, Aquatic ecosystems, Hermatypic coral",
author = "S.J. Hennige and D.J. Smith and R. Perkins and M Consalvey and Paterson, {David Maxwell} and D.J. Suggett",
year = "2008",
month = "10",
day = "13",
doi = "10.3354/meps07612",
language = "English",
volume = "369",
pages = "77--88",
journal = "Marine Ecology Progress Series",
issn = "0171-8630",
publisher = "Inter-Research",

}

RIS (suitable for import to EndNote) - Download

TY - JOUR

T1 - Photoacclimation, growth and distribution of massive coral species in clear and turbid waters

AU - Hennige, S.J.

AU - Smith, D.J.

AU - Perkins, R.

AU - Consalvey, M

AU - Paterson, David Maxwell

AU - Suggett, D.J.

PY - 2008/10/13

Y1 - 2008/10/13

N2 - ABSTRACT: Massive coral species play a key role in coral reef ecosystems, adding significantly to physical integrity, long term stability and reef biodiversity. This study coupled the assessment of the distribution and abundance of 4 dominant massive coral species, Diploastrea heliopora, Favia speciosa, F. matthaii and Porites lutea, with investigations into species-specific photoacclimatory responses within the Wakatobi Marine National Park of southeast Sulawesi, Indonesia, to determine the potential of photoacclimation to be a driver of biological success. For this, rapid light curves using pulse amplitude modulated (PAM) chlorophyll a fluorescence techniques were employed with additional manipulations to circumvent differences of light quality and absorption between species and across environmental gradients. P. lutea was examined over a range of depths and sites to determine patterns of photoacclimation, and all 4 species were assessed at a single depth between sites for which long-term data for coral community structure and growth existed. Light availability was more highly constrained with depth than between sites; consequently, photoacclimation patterns for P. lutea appeared greater with depth than across environmental gradients. All 4 species were found to differentially modify the extent of non-photochemical quenching to maintain a constant photochemical operating efficiency (qP). Therefore, our results suggest that these massive corals photoacclimate to ensure a constant light-dependent rate of reduction of the plastoquinone pool across growth environments.

AB - ABSTRACT: Massive coral species play a key role in coral reef ecosystems, adding significantly to physical integrity, long term stability and reef biodiversity. This study coupled the assessment of the distribution and abundance of 4 dominant massive coral species, Diploastrea heliopora, Favia speciosa, F. matthaii and Porites lutea, with investigations into species-specific photoacclimatory responses within the Wakatobi Marine National Park of southeast Sulawesi, Indonesia, to determine the potential of photoacclimation to be a driver of biological success. For this, rapid light curves using pulse amplitude modulated (PAM) chlorophyll a fluorescence techniques were employed with additional manipulations to circumvent differences of light quality and absorption between species and across environmental gradients. P. lutea was examined over a range of depths and sites to determine patterns of photoacclimation, and all 4 species were assessed at a single depth between sites for which long-term data for coral community structure and growth existed. Light availability was more highly constrained with depth than between sites; consequently, photoacclimation patterns for P. lutea appeared greater with depth than across environmental gradients. All 4 species were found to differentially modify the extent of non-photochemical quenching to maintain a constant photochemical operating efficiency (qP). Therefore, our results suggest that these massive corals photoacclimate to ensure a constant light-dependent rate of reduction of the plastoquinone pool across growth environments.

KW - Chlorophyll a fluorescence

KW - Zooxanthellae

KW - PAM

KW - Photoacclimation

KW - Massive coral

KW - Indo-Pacific

KW - Shade-adapted colonies

KW - Fast repetition rate

KW - Measured in-situ

KW - Stylophora-pistillata

KW - Fluorescence measurements

KW - Chlorophyll fluorescence

KW - Photosynthetic activity

KW - Community structure

KW - Aquatic ecosystems

KW - Hermatypic coral

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=56149084819&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.int-res.com/abstracts/meps/v369/p77-88/?0=

U2 - 10.3354/meps07612

DO - 10.3354/meps07612

M3 - Article

VL - 369

SP - 77

EP - 88

JO - Marine Ecology Progress Series

T2 - Marine Ecology Progress Series

JF - Marine Ecology Progress Series

SN - 0171-8630

ER -

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ID: 410387