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Polyandry is context-dependent but not convenient in a mostly monandrous wasp

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Polyandry is context-dependent but not convenient in a mostly monandrous wasp. / Boulton, Rebecca; Shuker, David Michael.

In: Animal Behaviour, Vol. 112, 02.2016, p. 119-125.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Harvard

Boulton, R & Shuker, DM 2016, 'Polyandry is context-dependent but not convenient in a mostly monandrous wasp' Animal Behaviour, vol. 112, pp. 119-125. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.anbehav.2015.12.001

APA

Boulton, R., & Shuker, D. M. (2016). Polyandry is context-dependent but not convenient in a mostly monandrous wasp. Animal Behaviour, 112, 119-125. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.anbehav.2015.12.001

Vancouver

Boulton R, Shuker DM. Polyandry is context-dependent but not convenient in a mostly monandrous wasp. Animal Behaviour. 2016 Feb;112:119-125. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.anbehav.2015.12.001

Author

Boulton, Rebecca ; Shuker, David Michael. / Polyandry is context-dependent but not convenient in a mostly monandrous wasp. In: Animal Behaviour. 2016 ; Vol. 112. pp. 119-125.

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@article{dfe5f0b838d14a94846ed985b1068ebe,
title = "Polyandry is context-dependent but not convenient in a mostly monandrous wasp",
abstract = "Research over the past two decades suggests that polyandry is almost ubiquitous in nature. In some cases, females can gain direct and indirect (genetic) fitness benefits from mating with multiple males. However, when females accept superfluous matings without gaining any clear benefit, polyandry has been interpreted as a strategy to mitigate the costs of resisting or avoiding matings, a situation known as convenience polyandry. When females mate out of ‘convenience’ the mating rate is expected to be plastic, since females should mate at a higher rate when the costs of resistance or avoidance are high, for instance when males occur in high densities and/or around resources required by females such as oviposition sites. Here we show that remating in Nasonia vitripennis, a species of wasp that is largely monandrous in the wild but that evolves polyandry under laboratory culture, is dependent upon the availability of hosts for oviposition and upon male density. We found that females mated at a higher rate when male density was high but only if a suitable oviposition substrate was available. Outwardly this seems suggestive of convenience polyandry. However, females that remated under these conditions did not gain more time to oviposit than females that resisted superfluous matings. The results of this study highlight the importance of comprehensively assessing the costs and benefits of mating before attributing the observed behaviour to convenience polyandry. Furthermore, these results add to the growing body of evidence that the ecological context under which sexual interactions occur is critical to the economics of mating.",
keywords = "Context dependence, Cost mitigation, Polyandry, Sex allocation, Sexual harassment",
author = "Rebecca Boulton and Shuker, {David Michael}",
note = "R.A.B. is supported by a NERC DTG studentship to R.A.B.",
year = "2016",
month = "2",
doi = "10.1016/j.anbehav.2015.12.001",
language = "English",
volume = "112",
pages = "119--125",
journal = "Animal Behaviour",
issn = "0003-3472",
publisher = "ACADEMIC PRESS LTD- ELSEVIER SCIENCE LTD",

}

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TY - JOUR

T1 - Polyandry is context-dependent but not convenient in a mostly monandrous wasp

AU - Boulton, Rebecca

AU - Shuker, David Michael

N1 - R.A.B. is supported by a NERC DTG studentship to R.A.B.

PY - 2016/2

Y1 - 2016/2

N2 - Research over the past two decades suggests that polyandry is almost ubiquitous in nature. In some cases, females can gain direct and indirect (genetic) fitness benefits from mating with multiple males. However, when females accept superfluous matings without gaining any clear benefit, polyandry has been interpreted as a strategy to mitigate the costs of resisting or avoiding matings, a situation known as convenience polyandry. When females mate out of ‘convenience’ the mating rate is expected to be plastic, since females should mate at a higher rate when the costs of resistance or avoidance are high, for instance when males occur in high densities and/or around resources required by females such as oviposition sites. Here we show that remating in Nasonia vitripennis, a species of wasp that is largely monandrous in the wild but that evolves polyandry under laboratory culture, is dependent upon the availability of hosts for oviposition and upon male density. We found that females mated at a higher rate when male density was high but only if a suitable oviposition substrate was available. Outwardly this seems suggestive of convenience polyandry. However, females that remated under these conditions did not gain more time to oviposit than females that resisted superfluous matings. The results of this study highlight the importance of comprehensively assessing the costs and benefits of mating before attributing the observed behaviour to convenience polyandry. Furthermore, these results add to the growing body of evidence that the ecological context under which sexual interactions occur is critical to the economics of mating.

AB - Research over the past two decades suggests that polyandry is almost ubiquitous in nature. In some cases, females can gain direct and indirect (genetic) fitness benefits from mating with multiple males. However, when females accept superfluous matings without gaining any clear benefit, polyandry has been interpreted as a strategy to mitigate the costs of resisting or avoiding matings, a situation known as convenience polyandry. When females mate out of ‘convenience’ the mating rate is expected to be plastic, since females should mate at a higher rate when the costs of resistance or avoidance are high, for instance when males occur in high densities and/or around resources required by females such as oviposition sites. Here we show that remating in Nasonia vitripennis, a species of wasp that is largely monandrous in the wild but that evolves polyandry under laboratory culture, is dependent upon the availability of hosts for oviposition and upon male density. We found that females mated at a higher rate when male density was high but only if a suitable oviposition substrate was available. Outwardly this seems suggestive of convenience polyandry. However, females that remated under these conditions did not gain more time to oviposit than females that resisted superfluous matings. The results of this study highlight the importance of comprehensively assessing the costs and benefits of mating before attributing the observed behaviour to convenience polyandry. Furthermore, these results add to the growing body of evidence that the ecological context under which sexual interactions occur is critical to the economics of mating.

KW - Context dependence

KW - Cost mitigation

KW - Polyandry

KW - Sex allocation

KW - Sexual harassment

U2 - 10.1016/j.anbehav.2015.12.001

DO - 10.1016/j.anbehav.2015.12.001

M3 - Article

VL - 112

SP - 119

EP - 125

JO - Animal Behaviour

T2 - Animal Behaviour

JF - Animal Behaviour

SN - 0003-3472

ER -

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ID: 239796501