Skip to content

Research at St Andrews

Population dynamics and transcriptomic responses of Chorthippus albonemus (Orthoptera: Acrididae) to herbivore grazing intensity

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Author(s)

Xinghu Qin, Jingchuan Ma, Xunbing Huang, Robert L Kallenbach, T Ryan Lock, Md Ali, Zehua Zhang

School/Research organisations

Abstract

Livestock grazing can trigger outbreaks of insect pests in steppe ecosystems of Inner Mongolia in China. However, the physiological responses of the grasshopper Chorthippus albonemus to grazing are not well-understood. Here we investigated the effects of sheep grazing on the population dynamics and transcriptomic response of C. albonemus. We collected the insects three times (about 20 days apart) in 1.33-ha plots in which there were no grazing, light grazing, moderate grazing, heavy grazing, or overgrazing. Our results showed that continuous grazing significantly decreased plant biomass and influenced plant succession. Total insect species diversity significantly declined along the grazing intensity gradient and over time. Results of the first two collections of C. albonemus indicated that moderate grazing significantly increased the abundance of C. albonemus. However, abundance was significantly decreased in plots that were overgrazed, possibly because of food stress and environmental pressures. Under moderate grazing, betA and CHDH genes were significantly upregulated in C. albonemus. In response to higher grazing intensity, upregulated genes included those involved in serine-type peptidase activity, anatomical structure development, and sensory organ development; downregulated genes included those involved in the structural constituents of the ribosome and ribosome processes. Genes strongly upregulated in response to heavy grazing pressure included adaptive genes such as those encoding ankyrin repeat domain-containing protein and HSP. These findings improve our understanding of the role of the transcriptome in C. albonemus population response to livestock grazing and may provide useful targets for grasshopper control.
Close

Details

Original languageEnglish
Article number136
Number of pages12
JournalFrontiers in Ecology and Evolution
Volume5
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 6 Nov 2017

    Research areas

  • Insect diversity, Population dynamics, Transcriptome, Chorthippus albonemus, Livestock grazing

Discover related content
Find related publications, people, projects and more using interactive charts.

View graph of relations

Related by journal

  1. Frontiers in Ecology and Evolution (Journal)

    David Ellard Keith Ferrier (Member of editorial board)

    2017 → …

    Activity: Publication peer-review and editorial work typesEditor of research journal

  2. Frontiers in Ecology and Evolution (Journal)

    David Ellard Keith Ferrier (Member of editorial board)

    2014 → …

    Activity: Publication peer-review and editorial work typesEditor of research journal

Related by journal

  1. Manipulative and technological skills do not require a slow life history

    Breen, A., Sugasawa, S. & Healy, S. D., 9 Feb 2021, In: Frontiers in Ecology and Evolution. 9

    Research output: Contribution to journalComment/debatepeer-review

  2. Modeling recruitment of birth cohorts to the breeding population: a hidden Markov model approach

    Worthington, H., King, R., McCrea, R., Smout, S. C. & Pomeroy, P., 1 Mar 2021, In: Frontiers in Ecology and Evolution. 9, 13 p., 600967.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

  3. The shape of species abundance distributions across spatial scales

    Antão, L. H., Magurran, A. E. & Dornelas, M., 7 Apr 2021, In: Frontiers in Ecology and Evolution. 9, 11 p., 626730.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

  4. Social recognition and social attraction in group-living fishes

    Ward, A. J. W., Kent, M. I. A. & Webster, M. M., 2 Feb 2020, In: Frontiers in Ecology and Evolution. 8, 16 p., 15.

    Research output: Contribution to journalReview articlepeer-review

  5. Young birds switch but old birds lead: how barnacle geese adjust migratory habits to environmental change

    Oudman, T., Laland, K., Ruxton, G., Tombre, I., Shimmings, P. & Prop, J., 9 Jan 2020, In: Frontiers in Ecology and Evolution. 7, 15 p., 502.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

ID: 251605030

Top