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Population geography I: epistemological opportunities of mixed methods

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Population geography is rightly recognised for its quantitative expertise. Yet, the methodological and epistemological diversification that has taken place within the sub-discipline alongside decades of theoretical developments has gone largely undiscussed. In this report, I suggest that population geography is methodologically multilingual and thus well placed to embrace mixed methods. This would bring epistemological opportunities for population geographers, advancing the sub-discipline and engagement beyond in academia and elsewhere. The confluence of theoretical and methodological developments, and global challenges that demand attention of population scholars, means the time is ripe to broaden the lens of population geographies through deliberate pursuit of mixed methods agendas.

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Details

Original languageEnglish
Number of pages9
JournalProgress in Human Geography
VolumeOnlineFirst
Early online date14 Sep 2020
DOIs
Publication statusE-pub ahead of print - 14 Sep 2020

    Research areas

  • Critical quantitative social science, Epistemology, Interdisciplinarity, Methodological multilingualism, Mixed methods

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