Skip to content

Research at St Andrews

Predicting muscle force generation during fast-starts for the common carp Cyprinus carpio

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Author(s)

J M Wakeling, I A Johnston

School/Research organisations

Abstract

Muscle contractile properties have been characterised for white myotomal muscle from the common carp Cyprinus carpio at 10, 15, and 20 degrees C. The time course of muscle force development was measured when one, two, or three stimuli were delivered at the onset of constant velocity shortening. As the shortening velocity increased several parameters decreased including the maximum force, the time course for the contraction and the relative duration of the deactivation compared to the activation. The maximum force and the relative rates of activation to deactivation for the contraction were relatively independent of temperature, whereas the duration of the contraction decreased with increasing temperature. A predictive model was developed which was based on fitting a modified Weibull distribution to these observations. The model was used to interpolate the expected contractile forces during cyclic length-changes. Measured and predicted values for force and power during such cyclic work-loop experiments showed an excellent agreement over the range of shortening regimes typically found during swimming behaviours. However, the predicted force was overestimated during the deactivation phase of the contractions when the shortening velocities exceeded those found during swimming.

Close

Details

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)391-401
Number of pages11
JournalJournal of Comparative Physiology B: Biochemical, Systems, and Environmental Physiology
Volume169
Publication statusPublished - Sep 1999

    Research areas

  • muscle mechanics, skeletal muscle, force, power output, velocity-dependent deactivation, POWER OUTPUT, TEMPERATURE-ACCLIMATION, WHITE MUSCLE, VELOCITY CHARACTERISTICS, MYOXOCEPHALUS-SCORPIUS, CYCLICAL CONTRACTIONS, MYOFILAMENT OVERLAP, THERMAL-DEPENDENCE, SARCOMERE-LENGTH, ESCAPE RESPONSES

Discover related content
Find related publications, people, projects and more using interactive charts.

View graph of relations

Related by author

  1. Demonstration of the use of environmental DNA for the non-invasive genotyping of a bivalve mollusk, the European flat oyster (Ostrea edulis)

    Holman, L., Hollenbeck, C. M., Ashton, T. J. & Johnston, I. A., 19 Nov 2019, In : Frontiers in Genetics. 10, 7 p., 1159.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

  2. Influence of feed ration size on somatic and muscle growth in landlocked dwarf and farmed Atlantic salmon Salmo salar

    Andersen, Ø., Vieira, V., Dessen, J-E. & Johnston, I. A., Apr 2019, In : Journal of Fish Biology. 94, 4, p. 614-620 7 p.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

  3. Genomic tools and selective breeding in molluscs

    Hollenbeck, C. M. & Johnston, I. A., 18 Jul 2018, In : Frontiers in Genetics. 9, 15 p., 253.

    Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

  4. A collaborative European approach to accelerating translational marine science

    Brennecke, P., Ferrante, M., Johnston, I. A. & Smith, D., 5 Jul 2018, In : Journal of Marine Science and Engineering. 6, 3, 12 p., 81.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Related by journal

  1. Physiological constraints and energetic costs of diving behaviour in marine mammals: a review of studies using trained Steller sea lions diving in the open ocean

    Rosen, D., Hindle, A., Fahlman, A., Gerlinsky, C., Goundie, E., Hastie, G. D., Volpov, B. & Trites, A., Jan 2017, In : Journal of Comparative Physiology B: Biochemical, Systems, and Environmental Physiology. 187, 1, p. 29-50 22 p.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

ID: 836227

Top