Skip to content

Research at St Andrews

Predicting population level risk effects of predation from the responses of individuals

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

DOI

Open Access permissions

Open

Abstract

Fear of predation produces large effects on prey population dynamics through indirect risk effects that can cause even greater impacts than direct predation mortality. As yet, there is no general theoretical framework for predicting when and how these population risk effects will arise in specific prey populations, meaning there is often little consideration given to the key role predator risk effects can play in understanding conservation and wildlife management challenges. Here, we propose population predator risk effects can be predicted through an extension of individual risk trade-off theory and show for the first time that this is the case in a wild vertebrate system. Specifically, we demonstrate that the timing (in specific months of the year), occurrence (at low food availability), cause (reduction in individual energy reserves) and type (starvation mortality) of a population level predator risk effect can be successfully predicted from individual responses using a widely applicable theoretical framework (individual based risk trade-off theory). Our results suggest individually-based risk-trade-off frameworks could allow a wide range of population level predator risk effects to be predicted from existing ecological theory, which would enable risk effects to be more routinely integrated into consideration of population processes and in applied situations such as conservation.
Close

Details

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)2006-2015
Number of pages10
JournalEcology
Volume95
Issue number7
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jul 2014

    Research areas

  • Bottlenose dolphin; Tursiops truncates, Harbor porpoise; Phocoena phocoena, Indirect effects, Individual-based theory, Lethal porpoise-dolphin interactons

Discover related content
Find related publications, people, projects and more using interactive charts.

View graph of relations

Related by author

  1. Seasonal differences in baseline innate immune function are better explained by environment than annual cycle stage in a year-round breeding tropical songbird

    Nwaogu, C. J., Cresswell, W., Versteegh, M. A. & Tieleman, B. I., 6 Feb 2019, In : Journal of Animal Ecology. Early View, 17 p.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

  2. Temperature and aridity determine body size conformity to Bergmann’s rule independent of latitudinal differences in a tropical environment

    Nwaogu, C. J., Tieleman, B. I., Bitrus, K. & Cresswell, W. R. L., Oct 2018, In : Journal of Ornithology. 159, 4, p. 1053–1062 10 p.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

  3. Weak breeding seasonality of a songbird in a seasonally arid tropical environment arises from individual flexibility and strongly seasonal moult

    Nwaogu, C. J., Tieleman, B. I. & Cresswell, W., 22 Sep 2018, In : Ibis. Early View, 13 p.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

  4. Spring migration strategies of Whinchat Saxicola rubetra when successfully crossing potential barriers of the Sahara and the Mediterranean Sea

    Blackburn, E., Burgess, M., Freeman, B., Risely, A., Izang, A., Ivande, S., Hewson, C. & Cresswell, W., 2 May 2018, In : Ibis. Early View

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Related by journal

  1. Ecology (Journal)

    Monique Lea MacKenzie (Editor)
    2008 → …

    Activity: Publication peer-review and editorial work typesEditor of research journal

Related by journal

  1. A silent orchestra: convergent song loss in Hawaiian crickets is repeated, morphologically varied, and widespread

    Rayner, J., Aldridge, S., Montealegre-Z, F. & Bailey, N. W., 29 Apr 2019, In : Ecology. Early View, 4 p., e02694.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

  2. Dominant tree species drive beta diversity patterns in western Amazonia

    Draper, F. C., Asner, G. P., Honorio Coronado, E. N., Baker, T. R., García-Villacorta, R., Pitman, N. C. A., Fine, P. V. A., Phillips, O. L., Zárate Gómez, R., Amasifuén Guerra, C. A., Flores Arévalo, M., Vásquez Martínez, R., Brienen, R. J. W., Monteagudo-Mendoza, A., Torres Montenegro, L. A., Valderrama Sandoval, E., Roucoux, K. H., Ramírez Arévalo, F. R., Mesones Acuy, Í., Del Aguila Pasquel, J. & 5 othersTagle Casapia, X., Flores Llampazo, G., Corrales Medina, M., Reyna Huaymacari, J. & Baraloto, C., 1 Apr 2019, In : Ecology. 100, 4, e02636.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

  3. Negligible effect of competition on coral colony growth

    Alvarez-Noriega, M., Baird, A. H., Dornelas, M., Madin, J. S. & Connolly, S. R., Jun 2018, In : Ecology. 99, 6, p. 1347-1356 10 p.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

  4. Estimates of local biodiversity change over time stand up to scrutiny

    Vellend, M., Dornelas, M., Baeten, L., Beauséjour, R., Brown, C. D., De Frenne, P., Elmendorf, S. C., Gotelli, N. J., Moyes, F., Myers-Smith, I. H., Magurran, A. E., McGill, B. J., Shimadzu, H. & Sievers, C., Feb 2017, In : Ecology. 98, 2, p. 583-590 8 p.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

  5. Estimation and simulation of foraging trips in land-based marine predators

    Michelot, T., Langrock, R., Bestley, S., Jonsen, I. D., Photopoulou, T. & Patterson, T. A., Jul 2017, In : Ecology. 98, 7, p. 1932-1944 13 p.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

ID: 118991883