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Research at St Andrews

Primate Cognition

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

As the cognitive revolution was slow to come to the study of animal behavior, the vast majority of what we know about primate cognition has been discovered in the last 30 years. Building on the recognition that the physical and social worlds of humans and their living primate relatives pose many of the same evolutionary challenges, programs of research have established that the most basic cognitive skills and mental representations that humans use to navigate those worlds are already possessed by other primates. There may be differences between humans and other primates, however, in more complex cognitive skills, such as reasoning about relations, causality, time, and other minds. Of special importance, the human primate seems to possess a species-unique set of adaptations for "cultural intelligence,'' which are broad reaching in their effects on human cognition.

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Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)407-419
Number of pages13
JournalTopics in Cognitive Science
Volume2
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jul 2010

    Research areas

  • Primates, Cognition, Culture, Causality, Theory of mind, MONKEYS CEBUS-APELLA, CHIMPANZEES PAN-TROGLODYTES, CHILDREN HOMO-SAPIENS, ORANGUTANS PONGO-PYGMAEUS, HUMAN INTENTIONAL ACTION, MACACA-MULATTA, RHESUS-MONKEYS, YOUNG-CHILDREN, GREAT APES, OBJECT INDIVIDUATION

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