Skip to content

Research at St Andrews

Prior association reduces kleptoparasitic prey competition in shoals of three-spined sticklebacks

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Author(s)

Michael M. Webster, Paul J. B. Hart

School/Research organisations

Abstract

Familiarity within groups of animals is thought to consolidate social dominance hierarchies and reduce the frequency of contests over prey. For many species in nature, however, group composition is affected by dynamic fission-fusion events, and it is likely that not all individuals within a group will be familiar with each other at any given time. This means that the advantages of associating with familiar conspecifics may not be available to all individuals within a group. We investigated this effect by constructing shoals of three-spined sticklebacks, Gasterosteus aculeatus, that contained two familiar fish and four further individuals that were unfamiliar both to each other and to the familiar pair. We observed that, per capita, familiar pair members engaged in fewer kleptoparasitic prey contests with each other than they did with unfamiliar members and than unfamiliar members did with each other. We saw no differences in the mean proportion of prey consumed by familiar and unfamiliar individuals, nor any differences in tendency to initiate contests over prey. Our findings suggest that there are indirect benefits to be gained from foraging with familiar individuals and we discuss them in the context of adaptive trade-offs and social network theory. (c) 2007 The Association for the Study of Animal Behaviour Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved..

Close

Details

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)253-258
Number of pages6
JournalAnimal Behaviour
Volume74
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Aug 2007

    Research areas

  • competition, familiarity, fission-fusion societies, Gasterosteus aculeatus, group composition, social networks, three-spined stickleback, GUPPY POECILIA-RETICULATA, INDIVIDUAL RECOGNITION, FORAGING INFORMATION, SOCIAL-ORGANIZATION, AFRICAN BUFFALO, SCHOOL FIDELITY, PREDATION RISK, FAMILIAR FISH, PREFERENCES, BEHAVIOR

Discover related content
Find related publications, people, projects and more using interactive charts.

View graph of relations

Related by author

  1. A four-questions perspective on public information use in sticklebacks (Gasterosteidae)

    Webster, M. M., Chouinard-Thuly, L., Herczeg, G., Kitano, J., Riley, R. J., Rogers, S., Shapiro, M. D., Shikano, T. & Laland, K. N., 20 Feb 2019, In : Royal Society Open Science. 6, 2, 24 p., 181735.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

  2. No experimental evidence of stress-induced hyperthermia in zebrafish (Danio rerio)

    Jones, N. A. R., Mendo, T., Broell, F. & Webster, M. M., 24 Jan 2019, In : Journal of Experimental Biology. 222, 2, 8 p., jeb.192971.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

  3. Cohesion, order and information flow in the collective motion of mixed-species shoals

    Ward, A., Schaerf, T., Burns, A., Lizier, J., Crosato, E., Prokopenko, M. & Webster, M. M., 12 Dec 2018, In : Royal Society Open Science. 5, 12, 14 p., 181132.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

  4. Experience shapes social information use in foraging fish

    Webster, M. M. & Laland, K. N., Dec 2018, In : Animal Behaviour. 146, p. 63-70

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Related by journal

  1. Evolutionary roads to syntax

    Zuberbuhler, K., 10 Apr 2019, In : Animal Behaviour. In press

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

  2. Development of object manipulation in wild chimpanzees

    Lamon, N., Neumann, C. & Zuberbuhler, K., Jan 2018, In : Animal Behaviour. 135, p. 121-130

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

  3. Experience shapes social information use in foraging fish

    Webster, M. M. & Laland, K. N., Dec 2018, In : Animal Behaviour. 146, p. 63-70

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

  4. Field experiments with wild primates reveal no consistent dominance-based bias in social learning

    Botting, J., Whiten, A., Grampp, M. & van de Waal, E., Feb 2018, In : Animal Behaviour. 136, p. 1-12 12 p.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

  5. Flexible use of simple and combined calls in female Campbell's monkeys

    Coye, C., Ouattara, K., Arlet, M. E., Lemmasson, A. & Zuberbuhler, K., Jul 2018, In : Animal Behaviour. 141, p. 171-181 11 p.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Related by journal

  1. Animal Behaviour (Journal)

    Susan Denise Healy (Editor)
    1 Jan 201831 Dec 2018

    Activity: Publication peer-review and editorial work typesEditor of research journal

  2. Animal Behaviour (Journal)

    Will Cresswell (Reviewer)
    15 Sep 2017

    Activity: Publication peer-review and editorial work typesPeer review of manuscripts

  3. Animal Behaviour (Journal)

    Michael Munro Webster (Editor)
    1 Jan 201731 Dec 2019

    Activity: Publication peer-review and editorial work typesEditor of research journal

  4. Animal Behaviour (Journal)

    Susan Denise Healy (Editor)
    1 Jan 201731 Dec 2017

    Activity: Publication peer-review and editorial work typesEditor of research journal

  5. Animal Behaviour (Journal)

    Susan Denise Healy (Editor)
    1 Jun 201631 Dec 2016

    Activity: Publication peer-review and editorial work typesEditor of research journal

ID: 642347