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Putting hell first: cruelty, historicism, and the missing moral theory of damnation

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Putting hell first : cruelty, historicism, and the missing moral theory of damnation. / Perry, John.

In: Scottish Journal of Theology, Vol. 69, No. 1, 02.2016, p. 1-19.

Research output: Research - peer-reviewArticle

Harvard

Perry, J 2016, 'Putting hell first: cruelty, historicism, and the missing moral theory of damnation' Scottish Journal of Theology, vol 69, no. 1, pp. 1-19. DOI: 10.1017/S0036930615000745

APA

Perry, J. (2016). Putting hell first: cruelty, historicism, and the missing moral theory of damnation. Scottish Journal of Theology, 69(1), 1-19. DOI: 10.1017/S0036930615000745

Vancouver

Perry J. Putting hell first: cruelty, historicism, and the missing moral theory of damnation. Scottish Journal of Theology. 2016 Feb;69(1):1-19. Available from, DOI: 10.1017/S0036930615000745

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Perry, John. / Putting hell first : cruelty, historicism, and the missing moral theory of damnation. In: Scottish Journal of Theology. 2016 ; Vol. 69, No. 1. pp. 1-19

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@article{b495d6e1d9954f08bdad0fea49ab5457,
title = "Putting hell first: cruelty, historicism, and the missing moral theory of damnation",
abstract = "Recent work on the morality of hell spans the various subdisciplines of theology, with the ironic exception of theological ethics. An adequate defence of hell requires a positive account of how God’s eternally tormenting some humans is beautiful, just and worthy of worship. This suggests a short-term and long-term task. The short-term task, which this article pursues, tests whether an adequate moral theory is available by evaluating three possible candidates, the third of which is the most interesting, as it offers a historicist defence of hell: we believe hell is cruel only because of aversions to cruel and unusual punishment that emerged in modernity. Nonetheless, all three defences are inadequate, suggesting a longer term goal: we need either better moral theories or better accounts of hell, as well as greater analytic clarity regarding theological statements of the form, 'I want doctrine y to be true but believe doctrine x is true'.",
keywords = "Hell, Universalism, Ethics, Punishment, Voluntarism, Cruelty, Anselm, History",
author = "John Perry",
year = "2016",
month = "2",
doi = "10.1017/S0036930615000745",
volume = "69",
pages = "1--19",
journal = "Scottish Journal of Theology",
issn = "0036-9306",
publisher = "Cambridge University Press",
number = "1",

}

RIS (suitable for import to EndNote) - Download

TY - JOUR

T1 - Putting hell first

T2 - Scottish Journal of Theology

AU - Perry,John

PY - 2016/2

Y1 - 2016/2

N2 - Recent work on the morality of hell spans the various subdisciplines of theology, with the ironic exception of theological ethics. An adequate defence of hell requires a positive account of how God’s eternally tormenting some humans is beautiful, just and worthy of worship. This suggests a short-term and long-term task. The short-term task, which this article pursues, tests whether an adequate moral theory is available by evaluating three possible candidates, the third of which is the most interesting, as it offers a historicist defence of hell: we believe hell is cruel only because of aversions to cruel and unusual punishment that emerged in modernity. Nonetheless, all three defences are inadequate, suggesting a longer term goal: we need either better moral theories or better accounts of hell, as well as greater analytic clarity regarding theological statements of the form, 'I want doctrine y to be true but believe doctrine x is true'.

AB - Recent work on the morality of hell spans the various subdisciplines of theology, with the ironic exception of theological ethics. An adequate defence of hell requires a positive account of how God’s eternally tormenting some humans is beautiful, just and worthy of worship. This suggests a short-term and long-term task. The short-term task, which this article pursues, tests whether an adequate moral theory is available by evaluating three possible candidates, the third of which is the most interesting, as it offers a historicist defence of hell: we believe hell is cruel only because of aversions to cruel and unusual punishment that emerged in modernity. Nonetheless, all three defences are inadequate, suggesting a longer term goal: we need either better moral theories or better accounts of hell, as well as greater analytic clarity regarding theological statements of the form, 'I want doctrine y to be true but believe doctrine x is true'.

KW - Hell

KW - Universalism

KW - Ethics

KW - Punishment

KW - Voluntarism

KW - Cruelty

KW - Anselm

KW - History

U2 - 10.1017/S0036930615000745

DO - 10.1017/S0036930615000745

M3 - Article

VL - 69

SP - 1

EP - 19

JO - Scottish Journal of Theology

JF - Scottish Journal of Theology

SN - 0036-9306

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ID: 229891339