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Putting the Social Into Social Learning: Explaining Both Selectivity and Fidelity in Children's Copying Behavior

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

DOI

Standard

Putting the Social Into Social Learning: Explaining Both Selectivity and Fidelity in Children's Copying Behavior. / Over, Harriet; Carpenter, Malinda.

In: Journal of Comparative Psychology, Vol. 126, No. 2, 05.2012, p. 182-192.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Harvard

Over, H & Carpenter, M 2012, 'Putting the Social Into Social Learning: Explaining Both Selectivity and Fidelity in Children's Copying Behavior', Journal of Comparative Psychology, vol. 126, no. 2, pp. 182-192. https://doi.org/10.1037/a0024555

APA

Over, H., & Carpenter, M. (2012). Putting the Social Into Social Learning: Explaining Both Selectivity and Fidelity in Children's Copying Behavior. Journal of Comparative Psychology, 126(2), 182-192. https://doi.org/10.1037/a0024555

Vancouver

Over H, Carpenter M. Putting the Social Into Social Learning: Explaining Both Selectivity and Fidelity in Children's Copying Behavior. Journal of Comparative Psychology. 2012 May;126(2):182-192. https://doi.org/10.1037/a0024555

Author

Over, Harriet ; Carpenter, Malinda. / Putting the Social Into Social Learning: Explaining Both Selectivity and Fidelity in Children's Copying Behavior. In: Journal of Comparative Psychology. 2012 ; Vol. 126, No. 2. pp. 182-192.

Bibtex - Download

@article{81c73d9b76684c849bd9823dca4391f4,
title = "Putting the Social Into Social Learning: Explaining Both Selectivity and Fidelity in Children's Copying Behavior",
abstract = "Many previous accounts of imitation have pointed out that children's copying behavior is a means by which to learn from others, while virtually ignoring the social factors which influence imitation. These accounts have thus far been unable to explain flexibility in children's copying behavior (e.g., why children sometimes copy exactly and sometimes copy selectively). We propose that the complexity of children's imitation can only be fully understood by considering the social context in which it is produced. Three critical factors in determining what is copied are children's own (learning and/or social) goals in the situation, children's identification with the model and with the social group in general, and the social pressures which children experience within the imitative situation. The specific combination of these factors which is present during the imitative interaction can lead children to produce a more or less faithful reproduction of the model's act. Beyond explaining flexibility in children's copying behavior, this approach situates the developmental study of imitation within a broader social psychological framework, linking it conceptually with closely related topics such as mimicry, conformity, normativity, and the cultural transmission of group differences.",
keywords = "imitation, overimitation, identification, conformity, normativity, HOMO-SAPIENS, TOOL USE, NONCONSCIOUS MIMICRY, OVER-IMITATION, CHIMPANZEES, OVERIMITATION, PERCEPTION, INFANTS, CULTURE, IDENTIFICATION",
author = "Harriet Over and Malinda Carpenter",
year = "2012",
month = "5",
doi = "10.1037/a0024555",
language = "English",
volume = "126",
pages = "182--192",
journal = "Journal of Comparative Psychology",
issn = "0735-7036",
publisher = "AMER PSYCHOLOGICAL ASSOC",
number = "2",

}

RIS (suitable for import to EndNote) - Download

TY - JOUR

T1 - Putting the Social Into Social Learning: Explaining Both Selectivity and Fidelity in Children's Copying Behavior

AU - Over, Harriet

AU - Carpenter, Malinda

PY - 2012/5

Y1 - 2012/5

N2 - Many previous accounts of imitation have pointed out that children's copying behavior is a means by which to learn from others, while virtually ignoring the social factors which influence imitation. These accounts have thus far been unable to explain flexibility in children's copying behavior (e.g., why children sometimes copy exactly and sometimes copy selectively). We propose that the complexity of children's imitation can only be fully understood by considering the social context in which it is produced. Three critical factors in determining what is copied are children's own (learning and/or social) goals in the situation, children's identification with the model and with the social group in general, and the social pressures which children experience within the imitative situation. The specific combination of these factors which is present during the imitative interaction can lead children to produce a more or less faithful reproduction of the model's act. Beyond explaining flexibility in children's copying behavior, this approach situates the developmental study of imitation within a broader social psychological framework, linking it conceptually with closely related topics such as mimicry, conformity, normativity, and the cultural transmission of group differences.

AB - Many previous accounts of imitation have pointed out that children's copying behavior is a means by which to learn from others, while virtually ignoring the social factors which influence imitation. These accounts have thus far been unable to explain flexibility in children's copying behavior (e.g., why children sometimes copy exactly and sometimes copy selectively). We propose that the complexity of children's imitation can only be fully understood by considering the social context in which it is produced. Three critical factors in determining what is copied are children's own (learning and/or social) goals in the situation, children's identification with the model and with the social group in general, and the social pressures which children experience within the imitative situation. The specific combination of these factors which is present during the imitative interaction can lead children to produce a more or less faithful reproduction of the model's act. Beyond explaining flexibility in children's copying behavior, this approach situates the developmental study of imitation within a broader social psychological framework, linking it conceptually with closely related topics such as mimicry, conformity, normativity, and the cultural transmission of group differences.

KW - imitation

KW - overimitation

KW - identification

KW - conformity

KW - normativity

KW - HOMO-SAPIENS

KW - TOOL USE

KW - NONCONSCIOUS MIMICRY

KW - OVER-IMITATION

KW - CHIMPANZEES

KW - OVERIMITATION

KW - PERCEPTION

KW - INFANTS

KW - CULTURE

KW - IDENTIFICATION

U2 - 10.1037/a0024555

DO - 10.1037/a0024555

M3 - Article

VL - 126

SP - 182

EP - 192

JO - Journal of Comparative Psychology

JF - Journal of Comparative Psychology

SN - 0735-7036

IS - 2

ER -

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