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Radiative effects of clouds and water vapor on an axisymmetric monsoon

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

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Radiative effects of clouds and water vapor on an axisymmetric monsoon. / Byrne, Michael P.; Zanna, Laure.

In: Journal of Climate, Vol. 33, No. 20, 15.10.2020, p. 8789-8811.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Harvard

Byrne, MP & Zanna, L 2020, 'Radiative effects of clouds and water vapor on an axisymmetric monsoon', Journal of Climate, vol. 33, no. 20, pp. 8789-8811. https://doi.org/10.1175/JCLI-D-19-0974.1

APA

Byrne, M. P., & Zanna, L. (2020). Radiative effects of clouds and water vapor on an axisymmetric monsoon. Journal of Climate, 33(20), 8789-8811. https://doi.org/10.1175/JCLI-D-19-0974.1

Vancouver

Byrne MP, Zanna L. Radiative effects of clouds and water vapor on an axisymmetric monsoon. Journal of Climate. 2020 Oct 15;33(20):8789-8811. https://doi.org/10.1175/JCLI-D-19-0974.1

Author

Byrne, Michael P. ; Zanna, Laure. / Radiative effects of clouds and water vapor on an axisymmetric monsoon. In: Journal of Climate. 2020 ; Vol. 33, No. 20. pp. 8789-8811.

Bibtex - Download

@article{b17e68e3e94847889dd343e32fca9b6e,
title = "Radiative effects of clouds and water vapor on an axisymmetric monsoon",
abstract = "Monsoons are summertime circulations shaping climates and societies across the tropics and subtropics. Here the radiative effects controlling an axisymmetric monsoon and its response to climate change are investigated using aquaplanet simulations. The influences of clouds, water vapor, and CO2 on the axisymmetric monsoon are decomposed using the radiation-locking technique. Seasonal variations in clouds and water vapor strongly modulate the axisymmetric monsoon, reducing net precipitation by approximately half. Warming and moistening of the axisymmetric monsoon by seasonal longwave cloud and water vapor effects are counteracted by a strong shortwave cloud effect. The shortwave cloud effect also expedites onset of the axisymmetric monsoon by approximately two weeks, whereas longwave cloud and water vapor effects delay onset. A conceptual model relates the timing of monsoon onset to the efficiency of surface cooling. In climate change simulations CO2 forcing and the water vapor feedback have similar influences on the axisymmetric monsoon, warming the surface and moistening the region. In contrast, clouds have a negligible effect on surface temperature yet dominate the monsoon circulation response. A new perspective for understanding how cloud radiative effects shape the monsoon circulation response to climate change is introduced. The radiation-locking simulations and analyses advance understanding of how radiative processes influence an axisymmetric monsoon, and establish a framework for interpreting monsoon–radiation coupling in observations, in state-of-the-art models, and in different climate states.",
keywords = "Large-scale motions, Monsoons, Climate change, Cloud radiative effects, Radiative fluxes, Water vapour",
author = "Byrne, {Michael P.} and Laure Zanna",
note = "Funding: This project has received funding from the European Union{\textquoteright}s Horizon 2020 research and innovation programme under the Marie Sk{\l}odowska-Curie Grant Agreement 794063 and the UK Natural Environment Research Council{\textquoteright}s Grant NE/R000727/1.",
year = "2020",
month = oct,
day = "15",
doi = "10.1175/JCLI-D-19-0974.1",
language = "English",
volume = "33",
pages = "8789--8811",
journal = "Journal of Climate",
issn = "0894-8755",
publisher = "American Meteorological Society",
number = "20",

}

RIS (suitable for import to EndNote) - Download

TY - JOUR

T1 - Radiative effects of clouds and water vapor on an axisymmetric monsoon

AU - Byrne, Michael P.

AU - Zanna, Laure

N1 - Funding: This project has received funding from the European Union’s Horizon 2020 research and innovation programme under the Marie Skłodowska-Curie Grant Agreement 794063 and the UK Natural Environment Research Council’s Grant NE/R000727/1.

PY - 2020/10/15

Y1 - 2020/10/15

N2 - Monsoons are summertime circulations shaping climates and societies across the tropics and subtropics. Here the radiative effects controlling an axisymmetric monsoon and its response to climate change are investigated using aquaplanet simulations. The influences of clouds, water vapor, and CO2 on the axisymmetric monsoon are decomposed using the radiation-locking technique. Seasonal variations in clouds and water vapor strongly modulate the axisymmetric monsoon, reducing net precipitation by approximately half. Warming and moistening of the axisymmetric monsoon by seasonal longwave cloud and water vapor effects are counteracted by a strong shortwave cloud effect. The shortwave cloud effect also expedites onset of the axisymmetric monsoon by approximately two weeks, whereas longwave cloud and water vapor effects delay onset. A conceptual model relates the timing of monsoon onset to the efficiency of surface cooling. In climate change simulations CO2 forcing and the water vapor feedback have similar influences on the axisymmetric monsoon, warming the surface and moistening the region. In contrast, clouds have a negligible effect on surface temperature yet dominate the monsoon circulation response. A new perspective for understanding how cloud radiative effects shape the monsoon circulation response to climate change is introduced. The radiation-locking simulations and analyses advance understanding of how radiative processes influence an axisymmetric monsoon, and establish a framework for interpreting monsoon–radiation coupling in observations, in state-of-the-art models, and in different climate states.

AB - Monsoons are summertime circulations shaping climates and societies across the tropics and subtropics. Here the radiative effects controlling an axisymmetric monsoon and its response to climate change are investigated using aquaplanet simulations. The influences of clouds, water vapor, and CO2 on the axisymmetric monsoon are decomposed using the radiation-locking technique. Seasonal variations in clouds and water vapor strongly modulate the axisymmetric monsoon, reducing net precipitation by approximately half. Warming and moistening of the axisymmetric monsoon by seasonal longwave cloud and water vapor effects are counteracted by a strong shortwave cloud effect. The shortwave cloud effect also expedites onset of the axisymmetric monsoon by approximately two weeks, whereas longwave cloud and water vapor effects delay onset. A conceptual model relates the timing of monsoon onset to the efficiency of surface cooling. In climate change simulations CO2 forcing and the water vapor feedback have similar influences on the axisymmetric monsoon, warming the surface and moistening the region. In contrast, clouds have a negligible effect on surface temperature yet dominate the monsoon circulation response. A new perspective for understanding how cloud radiative effects shape the monsoon circulation response to climate change is introduced. The radiation-locking simulations and analyses advance understanding of how radiative processes influence an axisymmetric monsoon, and establish a framework for interpreting monsoon–radiation coupling in observations, in state-of-the-art models, and in different climate states.

KW - Large-scale motions

KW - Monsoons

KW - Climate change

KW - Cloud radiative effects

KW - Radiative fluxes

KW - Water vapour

U2 - 10.1175/JCLI-D-19-0974.1

DO - 10.1175/JCLI-D-19-0974.1

M3 - Article

VL - 33

SP - 8789

EP - 8811

JO - Journal of Climate

JF - Journal of Climate

SN - 0894-8755

IS - 20

ER -

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ID: 270732051

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