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Rapid parallel adaptation despite gene flow in silent crickets

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Rapid parallel adaptation despite gene flow in silent crickets. / Zhang, Xiao; Rayner, Jack G.; Blaxter, Mark; Bailey, Nathan W.

In: Nature Communications, Vol. 12, 50, 04.01.2021.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Harvard

Zhang, X, Rayner, JG, Blaxter, M & Bailey, NW 2021, 'Rapid parallel adaptation despite gene flow in silent crickets', Nature Communications, vol. 12, 50. https://doi.org/10.1038/s41467-020-20263-4

APA

Zhang, X., Rayner, J. G., Blaxter, M., & Bailey, N. W. (2021). Rapid parallel adaptation despite gene flow in silent crickets. Nature Communications, 12, [50]. https://doi.org/10.1038/s41467-020-20263-4

Vancouver

Zhang X, Rayner JG, Blaxter M, Bailey NW. Rapid parallel adaptation despite gene flow in silent crickets. Nature Communications. 2021 Jan 4;12. 50. https://doi.org/10.1038/s41467-020-20263-4

Author

Zhang, Xiao ; Rayner, Jack G. ; Blaxter, Mark ; Bailey, Nathan W. / Rapid parallel adaptation despite gene flow in silent crickets. In: Nature Communications. 2021 ; Vol. 12.

Bibtex - Download

@article{a3a5f259ad044d798d5a7b00196d23c0,
title = "Rapid parallel adaptation despite gene flow in silent crickets",
abstract = "Gene flow is predicted to impede parallel adaptation via de novo mutation, because it can introduce pre-existing adaptive alleles from population to population. We test this using Hawaiian crickets (Teleogryllus oceanicus) in which {\textquoteleft}flatwing{\textquoteright} males that lack sound-producing wing structures recently arose and spread under selection from an acoustically-orienting parasitoid. Morphometric and genetic comparisons identify distinct flatwing phenotypes in populations on three islands, localized to different loci. Nevertheless, we detect strong, recent and ongoing gene flow among the populations. Using genome scans and gene expression analysis we find that parallel evolution of flatwing on different islands is associated with shared genomic hotspots of adaptation that contain the gene doublesex, but the form of selection differs among islands and corresponds to known flatwing demographics in the wild. We thus show how parallel adaptation can occur on contemporary timescales despite gene flow, indicating that it could be less constrained than previously appreciated.",
author = "Xiao Zhang and Rayner, {Jack G.} and Mark Blaxter and Bailey, {Nathan W.}",
note = "The work was funded by Natural Environment Research Council awards to N.W.B. [NE/I027800/1, NE/L011255/1]. Bioinformatics support was provided by a Wellcome Trust ISSF award [105621/Z/14/Z]. X.Z. was supported by a China Scholarship Council PhD studentship [201703780018].",
year = "2021",
month = jan,
day = "4",
doi = "10.1038/s41467-020-20263-4",
language = "English",
volume = "12",
journal = "Nature Communications",
issn = "2041-1723",
publisher = "Nature publishing group",

}

RIS (suitable for import to EndNote) - Download

TY - JOUR

T1 - Rapid parallel adaptation despite gene flow in silent crickets

AU - Zhang, Xiao

AU - Rayner, Jack G.

AU - Blaxter, Mark

AU - Bailey, Nathan W.

N1 - The work was funded by Natural Environment Research Council awards to N.W.B. [NE/I027800/1, NE/L011255/1]. Bioinformatics support was provided by a Wellcome Trust ISSF award [105621/Z/14/Z]. X.Z. was supported by a China Scholarship Council PhD studentship [201703780018].

PY - 2021/1/4

Y1 - 2021/1/4

N2 - Gene flow is predicted to impede parallel adaptation via de novo mutation, because it can introduce pre-existing adaptive alleles from population to population. We test this using Hawaiian crickets (Teleogryllus oceanicus) in which ‘flatwing’ males that lack sound-producing wing structures recently arose and spread under selection from an acoustically-orienting parasitoid. Morphometric and genetic comparisons identify distinct flatwing phenotypes in populations on three islands, localized to different loci. Nevertheless, we detect strong, recent and ongoing gene flow among the populations. Using genome scans and gene expression analysis we find that parallel evolution of flatwing on different islands is associated with shared genomic hotspots of adaptation that contain the gene doublesex, but the form of selection differs among islands and corresponds to known flatwing demographics in the wild. We thus show how parallel adaptation can occur on contemporary timescales despite gene flow, indicating that it could be less constrained than previously appreciated.

AB - Gene flow is predicted to impede parallel adaptation via de novo mutation, because it can introduce pre-existing adaptive alleles from population to population. We test this using Hawaiian crickets (Teleogryllus oceanicus) in which ‘flatwing’ males that lack sound-producing wing structures recently arose and spread under selection from an acoustically-orienting parasitoid. Morphometric and genetic comparisons identify distinct flatwing phenotypes in populations on three islands, localized to different loci. Nevertheless, we detect strong, recent and ongoing gene flow among the populations. Using genome scans and gene expression analysis we find that parallel evolution of flatwing on different islands is associated with shared genomic hotspots of adaptation that contain the gene doublesex, but the form of selection differs among islands and corresponds to known flatwing demographics in the wild. We thus show how parallel adaptation can occur on contemporary timescales despite gene flow, indicating that it could be less constrained than previously appreciated.

UR - https://www.nature.com/articles/s41467-020-20263-4#Sec27

U2 - 10.1038/s41467-020-20263-4

DO - 10.1038/s41467-020-20263-4

M3 - Article

VL - 12

JO - Nature Communications

JF - Nature Communications

SN - 2041-1723

M1 - 50

ER -

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