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Reproductive strategies and energy sources fuelling reproductive growth in a protracted spawner

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Reproductive strategies and energy sources fuelling reproductive growth in a protracted spawner. / Mendo, T.; Semmens, J. M.; Lyle, J. M.; Tracey, S. R.; Moltschaniwskyj, N.

In: Marine Biology, Vol. 163, 2, 05.01.2016.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Harvard

Mendo, T, Semmens, JM, Lyle, JM, Tracey, SR & Moltschaniwskyj, N 2016, 'Reproductive strategies and energy sources fuelling reproductive growth in a protracted spawner' Marine Biology, vol. 163, 2. https://doi.org/10.1007/s00227-015-2785-7

APA

Mendo, T., Semmens, J. M., Lyle, J. M., Tracey, S. R., & Moltschaniwskyj, N. (2016). Reproductive strategies and energy sources fuelling reproductive growth in a protracted spawner. Marine Biology, 163, [2]. https://doi.org/10.1007/s00227-015-2785-7

Vancouver

Mendo T, Semmens JM, Lyle JM, Tracey SR, Moltschaniwskyj N. Reproductive strategies and energy sources fuelling reproductive growth in a protracted spawner. Marine Biology. 2016 Jan 5;163. 2. https://doi.org/10.1007/s00227-015-2785-7

Author

Mendo, T. ; Semmens, J. M. ; Lyle, J. M. ; Tracey, S. R. ; Moltschaniwskyj, N. / Reproductive strategies and energy sources fuelling reproductive growth in a protracted spawner. In: Marine Biology. 2016 ; Vol. 163.

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@article{f614c8b44e8d4fcea7c72e5903302593,
title = "Reproductive strategies and energy sources fuelling reproductive growth in a protracted spawner",
abstract = "Most marine invertebrates experience variable environments and for broadcast spawners, fertilisation success increases with greater synchronisation of spawning, so a capital breeding strategy is predicted. However, this prediction should be tested for species with protracted breeding seasons, since it is not clear how reproduction is fuelled over several consecutive months of spawning. The simultaneous hermaphrodite scallop Pecten fumatus was used to test the hypothesis that protracted spawning is supported by both capital and income strategies, depending on the state of energy reserves and food availability at the time of oocyte maturation. The study was carried out in Great Bay, Tasmania, Australia (147.335W, 43.220S) in 2010/2011. The use of glycogen, protein and lipid in the muscle, gonad, and digestive gland was examined, along with the role of atretic eggs as an alternative energy source for oogenesis and maturation. The reproductive stage of an individual was determined using only the ovaries. P. fumatus uses a capital breeding strategy early in the reproductive cycle during winter and spring (August–October) with muscle glycogen and protein and digestive gland lipid providing energy for oogenesis. Given there was no evidence of energy stores being used later in the reproductive cycle in late spring and summer (November–March), when less food was available for direct fuelling of reproduction, it appears that metabolites produced from oocyte lysis may have fuelled oogenesis. Recycling of energy from oocyte resorption must be considered as part of the strategy of energy use to fuel reproduction in marine invertebrates.",
keywords = "Shell length, Digestive gland, Reproductive stage, Mature oocyte, Gonad mass",
author = "T. Mendo and Semmens, {J. M.} and Lyle, {J. M.} and Tracey, {S. R.} and N. Moltschaniwskyj",
note = "This study was supported by funding to JMS by the Australian Government’s Fisheries Research Development Corporation (Project No. 2008/022); JMS and TM by the Tasmanian Department of Primary Industries, Parks, Water and Environment, Fishwise Community Grant; and TM by an Endeavour International Postgraduate Research Scholarship (EIPRS).",
year = "2016",
month = "1",
day = "5",
doi = "10.1007/s00227-015-2785-7",
language = "English",
volume = "163",
journal = "Marine Biology",
issn = "0025-3162",
publisher = "Springer-Verlag",

}

RIS (suitable for import to EndNote) - Download

TY - JOUR

T1 - Reproductive strategies and energy sources fuelling reproductive growth in a protracted spawner

AU - Mendo, T.

AU - Semmens, J. M.

AU - Lyle, J. M.

AU - Tracey, S. R.

AU - Moltschaniwskyj, N.

N1 - This study was supported by funding to JMS by the Australian Government’s Fisheries Research Development Corporation (Project No. 2008/022); JMS and TM by the Tasmanian Department of Primary Industries, Parks, Water and Environment, Fishwise Community Grant; and TM by an Endeavour International Postgraduate Research Scholarship (EIPRS).

PY - 2016/1/5

Y1 - 2016/1/5

N2 - Most marine invertebrates experience variable environments and for broadcast spawners, fertilisation success increases with greater synchronisation of spawning, so a capital breeding strategy is predicted. However, this prediction should be tested for species with protracted breeding seasons, since it is not clear how reproduction is fuelled over several consecutive months of spawning. The simultaneous hermaphrodite scallop Pecten fumatus was used to test the hypothesis that protracted spawning is supported by both capital and income strategies, depending on the state of energy reserves and food availability at the time of oocyte maturation. The study was carried out in Great Bay, Tasmania, Australia (147.335W, 43.220S) in 2010/2011. The use of glycogen, protein and lipid in the muscle, gonad, and digestive gland was examined, along with the role of atretic eggs as an alternative energy source for oogenesis and maturation. The reproductive stage of an individual was determined using only the ovaries. P. fumatus uses a capital breeding strategy early in the reproductive cycle during winter and spring (August–October) with muscle glycogen and protein and digestive gland lipid providing energy for oogenesis. Given there was no evidence of energy stores being used later in the reproductive cycle in late spring and summer (November–March), when less food was available for direct fuelling of reproduction, it appears that metabolites produced from oocyte lysis may have fuelled oogenesis. Recycling of energy from oocyte resorption must be considered as part of the strategy of energy use to fuel reproduction in marine invertebrates.

AB - Most marine invertebrates experience variable environments and for broadcast spawners, fertilisation success increases with greater synchronisation of spawning, so a capital breeding strategy is predicted. However, this prediction should be tested for species with protracted breeding seasons, since it is not clear how reproduction is fuelled over several consecutive months of spawning. The simultaneous hermaphrodite scallop Pecten fumatus was used to test the hypothesis that protracted spawning is supported by both capital and income strategies, depending on the state of energy reserves and food availability at the time of oocyte maturation. The study was carried out in Great Bay, Tasmania, Australia (147.335W, 43.220S) in 2010/2011. The use of glycogen, protein and lipid in the muscle, gonad, and digestive gland was examined, along with the role of atretic eggs as an alternative energy source for oogenesis and maturation. The reproductive stage of an individual was determined using only the ovaries. P. fumatus uses a capital breeding strategy early in the reproductive cycle during winter and spring (August–October) with muscle glycogen and protein and digestive gland lipid providing energy for oogenesis. Given there was no evidence of energy stores being used later in the reproductive cycle in late spring and summer (November–March), when less food was available for direct fuelling of reproduction, it appears that metabolites produced from oocyte lysis may have fuelled oogenesis. Recycling of energy from oocyte resorption must be considered as part of the strategy of energy use to fuel reproduction in marine invertebrates.

KW - Shell length

KW - Digestive gland

KW - Reproductive stage

KW - Mature oocyte

KW - Gonad mass

U2 - 10.1007/s00227-015-2785-7

DO - 10.1007/s00227-015-2785-7

M3 - Article

VL - 163

JO - Marine Biology

T2 - Marine Biology

JF - Marine Biology

SN - 0025-3162

M1 - 2

ER -

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ID: 251541730