Skip to content

Research at St Andrews

Resilience and higher order thinking

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Standard

Resilience and higher order thinking. / Fazey, Ioan Raymond Albert.

In: Ecology and Society, Vol. 15, No. 3, 08.2010, p. art 9.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Harvard

Fazey, IRA 2010, 'Resilience and higher order thinking', Ecology and Society, vol. 15, no. 3, pp. art 9.

APA

Fazey, I. R. A. (2010). Resilience and higher order thinking. Ecology and Society, 15(3), art 9.

Vancouver

Fazey IRA. Resilience and higher order thinking. Ecology and Society. 2010 Aug;15(3):art 9.

Author

Fazey, Ioan Raymond Albert. / Resilience and higher order thinking. In: Ecology and Society. 2010 ; Vol. 15, No. 3. pp. art 9.

Bibtex - Download

@article{195534fe2fc84825b129040537e84b3e,
title = "Resilience and higher order thinking",
abstract = "To appreciate, understand, and tackle chronic global social and environmental problems, greater appreciation of the importance of higher order thinking is required. Such thinking includes personal epistemological beliefs (PEBs), i.e., the beliefs people hold about the nature of knowledge and how something is known. These beliefs have profound implications for the way individuals relate to each other and the world, such as how people understand complex social-ecological systems. Resilience thinking is an approach to environmental stewardship that includes a number of interrelated concepts and has strong foundations in systemic ways of thinking. This paper (1) summarizes a review of educational psychology literature on PEBs, (2) explains why resilience thinking has potential to facilitate development of more sophisticated PEBs, (3) describes an example of a module designed to teach resilience thinking to undergraduate students in ways conducive to influencing PEBs, and (4) discusses a pilot study that evaluates the module's impact. Theoretical and preliminary evidence from the pilot evaluation suggests that resilience thinking which is underpinned by systems thinking has considerable potential to influence the development of more sophisticated PEBs. To be effective, however, careful consideration of how resilience thinking is taught is required. Finding ways to encourage students to take greater responsibility for their own learning and ensuring close alignment between assessment and desired learning outcomes are particularly important. ",
keywords = "Epistemology, Resilience, Systems thinking",
author = "Fazey, {Ioan Raymond Albert}",
year = "2010",
month = aug,
language = "English",
volume = "15",
pages = "art 9",
journal = "Ecology and Society",
issn = "1708-3087",
publisher = "The Resilience Alliance",
number = "3",

}

RIS (suitable for import to EndNote) - Download

TY - JOUR

T1 - Resilience and higher order thinking

AU - Fazey, Ioan Raymond Albert

PY - 2010/8

Y1 - 2010/8

N2 - To appreciate, understand, and tackle chronic global social and environmental problems, greater appreciation of the importance of higher order thinking is required. Such thinking includes personal epistemological beliefs (PEBs), i.e., the beliefs people hold about the nature of knowledge and how something is known. These beliefs have profound implications for the way individuals relate to each other and the world, such as how people understand complex social-ecological systems. Resilience thinking is an approach to environmental stewardship that includes a number of interrelated concepts and has strong foundations in systemic ways of thinking. This paper (1) summarizes a review of educational psychology literature on PEBs, (2) explains why resilience thinking has potential to facilitate development of more sophisticated PEBs, (3) describes an example of a module designed to teach resilience thinking to undergraduate students in ways conducive to influencing PEBs, and (4) discusses a pilot study that evaluates the module's impact. Theoretical and preliminary evidence from the pilot evaluation suggests that resilience thinking which is underpinned by systems thinking has considerable potential to influence the development of more sophisticated PEBs. To be effective, however, careful consideration of how resilience thinking is taught is required. Finding ways to encourage students to take greater responsibility for their own learning and ensuring close alignment between assessment and desired learning outcomes are particularly important.

AB - To appreciate, understand, and tackle chronic global social and environmental problems, greater appreciation of the importance of higher order thinking is required. Such thinking includes personal epistemological beliefs (PEBs), i.e., the beliefs people hold about the nature of knowledge and how something is known. These beliefs have profound implications for the way individuals relate to each other and the world, such as how people understand complex social-ecological systems. Resilience thinking is an approach to environmental stewardship that includes a number of interrelated concepts and has strong foundations in systemic ways of thinking. This paper (1) summarizes a review of educational psychology literature on PEBs, (2) explains why resilience thinking has potential to facilitate development of more sophisticated PEBs, (3) describes an example of a module designed to teach resilience thinking to undergraduate students in ways conducive to influencing PEBs, and (4) discusses a pilot study that evaluates the module's impact. Theoretical and preliminary evidence from the pilot evaluation suggests that resilience thinking which is underpinned by systems thinking has considerable potential to influence the development of more sophisticated PEBs. To be effective, however, careful consideration of how resilience thinking is taught is required. Finding ways to encourage students to take greater responsibility for their own learning and ensuring close alignment between assessment and desired learning outcomes are particularly important.

KW - Epistemology

KW - Resilience

KW - Systems thinking

UR - http://www.ecologyandsociety.org/vol15/iss3/art9

M3 - Article

VL - 15

SP - art 9

JO - Ecology and Society

JF - Ecology and Society

SN - 1708-3087

IS - 3

ER -

Related by journal

  1. Peatland and wetland ecosystems in Peruvian Amazonia: indigenous classifications and perspectives

    Schulz, C., Brañas, M. M., Núñez Pérez, C., Del Águila Villacorta, M., Laurie, N., Lawson, I. T. & Roucoux, K. H., 30 Apr 2019, In: Ecology and Society. 24, 2, 16 p., 12.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

  2. The “social” aspect of social-ecological systems: a critique of analytical frameworks and findings from a multisite study of coastal sustainability

    Stojanovic, T., McNae, H., Tett, P., Potts, T. W., Reis, J., Smith, H. D. & Dillingham, I., 1 Sep 2016, In: Ecology and Society. 21, 3, 15.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

  3. How does legacy create sticking points for environmental management? Insights from challenges to implementation of the ecosystem approach

    Waylen, K. A., Blackstock, K. L. & Holstead, K. L., 1 Jun 2015, In: Ecology and Society. 20, 2

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

  4. Interacting effects of change in climate, human population, land use, and water use on biodiversity and ecosystem services

    Elmhagen, B., Destouni, G., Angerbjörn, A., Borgström, S., Boyd, E., Cousins, S. A. O., Dalén, L., Ehrlén, J., Ermold, M., Hambäck, P. A., Hedlund, J., Hylander, K., Jaramillo, F., Lagerholm, V. K., Lyon, S. W., Moor, H., Nykvist, B., Pasanen-Mortensen, M., Plue, J., Prieto, C. & 2 others, van der Velde, Y. & Lindborg, R., 2015, In: Ecology and Society. 20, 1, 23.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

ID: 4711835

Top