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Response of benthic assemblages to multiple stressors: comparative effects of nutrient enrichment and physical disturbance

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Response of benthic assemblages to multiple stressors : comparative effects of nutrient enrichment and physical disturbance. / Kenworthy, Joseph M.; Paterson, David M.; Bishop, Melanie J.

In: Marine Ecology Progress Series, Vol. 562, 29.12.2016, p. 37-51.

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Kenworthy, JM, Paterson, DM & Bishop, MJ 2016, 'Response of benthic assemblages to multiple stressors: comparative effects of nutrient enrichment and physical disturbance' Marine Ecology Progress Series, vol. 562, pp. 37-51. https://doi.org/10.3354/meps11935

APA

Kenworthy, J. M., Paterson, D. M., & Bishop, M. J. (2016). Response of benthic assemblages to multiple stressors: comparative effects of nutrient enrichment and physical disturbance. Marine Ecology Progress Series, 562, 37-51. https://doi.org/10.3354/meps11935

Vancouver

Kenworthy JM, Paterson DM, Bishop MJ. Response of benthic assemblages to multiple stressors: comparative effects of nutrient enrichment and physical disturbance. Marine Ecology Progress Series. 2016 Dec 29;562:37-51. https://doi.org/10.3354/meps11935

Author

Kenworthy, Joseph M. ; Paterson, David M. ; Bishop, Melanie J. / Response of benthic assemblages to multiple stressors : comparative effects of nutrient enrichment and physical disturbance. In: Marine Ecology Progress Series. 2016 ; Vol. 562. pp. 37-51.

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@article{1a41bd2fe2c94e0f87ad67bf539ea2ef,
title = "Response of benthic assemblages to multiple stressors: comparative effects of nutrient enrichment and physical disturbance",
abstract = "Stressors to ecological communities often overlap in time and space and may have additive, synergistic or antagonistic effects. Nutrient enrichment and physical disturbance are 2 commonly co-occurring stressors to estuarine ecosystems, but their combined effects have mainly been investigated in mesocosm experiments of unknown relevance to field scenarios. Here, the interacting effects of these 2 stressors were examined at 2 field locations (Botany Bay and Lane Cove, New South Wales, Australia) using a fully orthogonal manipulative experiment. All possible combinations of zero, low and high intensities of nutrient enrichment and physical disturbance on macrofaunal and microphytobenthic communities were examined. Effects of stressors were generally site-specific and additive, differing in terms of magnitude of effects, although some idiosyncratic interactive effects were demonstrated for selected species. Where effects of stressors were observed, nutrient enrichment generally increased microphytobenthic biomass and altered the macrofaunal community structure while physical disturbance produced limited impacts. The divergent results of this and previous mesocosm experiments, which found primarily interactive effects of the stressors, highlights the importance of undertaking field experiments that offer a greater element of realism. Furthermore, this study, in finding differing responses to stressors at the 2 sites, highlights the importance of environmental context in mediating effects.",
keywords = "Context dependence, Disturbance, Field experiments, Macrobenthos, Microphytobenthos, Multiple stressors, Nutrient enrichment",
author = "Kenworthy, {Joseph M.} and Paterson, {David M.} and Bishop, {Melanie J.}",
note = "J.M.K. was supported by an International Macquarie University Research Excellence Scholarship during this research. Research funding was provided through the Department of Biological Sciences Macquarie University and an ARC Discovery Project DP1093444 to MJB. D.M.P. received funding from the MASTS pooling initiative (The Marine Alliance for Science and Technology for Scotland) and their support is gratefully acknowledged. MASTS is funded by the Scottish Funding Council (grant reference HR09011) and contributing institutions.",
year = "2016",
month = "12",
day = "29",
doi = "10.3354/meps11935",
language = "English",
volume = "562",
pages = "37--51",
journal = "Marine Ecology Progress Series",
issn = "0171-8630",
publisher = "Inter-Research",

}

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TY - JOUR

T1 - Response of benthic assemblages to multiple stressors

T2 - Marine Ecology Progress Series

AU - Kenworthy, Joseph M.

AU - Paterson, David M.

AU - Bishop, Melanie J.

N1 - J.M.K. was supported by an International Macquarie University Research Excellence Scholarship during this research. Research funding was provided through the Department of Biological Sciences Macquarie University and an ARC Discovery Project DP1093444 to MJB. D.M.P. received funding from the MASTS pooling initiative (The Marine Alliance for Science and Technology for Scotland) and their support is gratefully acknowledged. MASTS is funded by the Scottish Funding Council (grant reference HR09011) and contributing institutions.

PY - 2016/12/29

Y1 - 2016/12/29

N2 - Stressors to ecological communities often overlap in time and space and may have additive, synergistic or antagonistic effects. Nutrient enrichment and physical disturbance are 2 commonly co-occurring stressors to estuarine ecosystems, but their combined effects have mainly been investigated in mesocosm experiments of unknown relevance to field scenarios. Here, the interacting effects of these 2 stressors were examined at 2 field locations (Botany Bay and Lane Cove, New South Wales, Australia) using a fully orthogonal manipulative experiment. All possible combinations of zero, low and high intensities of nutrient enrichment and physical disturbance on macrofaunal and microphytobenthic communities were examined. Effects of stressors were generally site-specific and additive, differing in terms of magnitude of effects, although some idiosyncratic interactive effects were demonstrated for selected species. Where effects of stressors were observed, nutrient enrichment generally increased microphytobenthic biomass and altered the macrofaunal community structure while physical disturbance produced limited impacts. The divergent results of this and previous mesocosm experiments, which found primarily interactive effects of the stressors, highlights the importance of undertaking field experiments that offer a greater element of realism. Furthermore, this study, in finding differing responses to stressors at the 2 sites, highlights the importance of environmental context in mediating effects.

AB - Stressors to ecological communities often overlap in time and space and may have additive, synergistic or antagonistic effects. Nutrient enrichment and physical disturbance are 2 commonly co-occurring stressors to estuarine ecosystems, but their combined effects have mainly been investigated in mesocosm experiments of unknown relevance to field scenarios. Here, the interacting effects of these 2 stressors were examined at 2 field locations (Botany Bay and Lane Cove, New South Wales, Australia) using a fully orthogonal manipulative experiment. All possible combinations of zero, low and high intensities of nutrient enrichment and physical disturbance on macrofaunal and microphytobenthic communities were examined. Effects of stressors were generally site-specific and additive, differing in terms of magnitude of effects, although some idiosyncratic interactive effects were demonstrated for selected species. Where effects of stressors were observed, nutrient enrichment generally increased microphytobenthic biomass and altered the macrofaunal community structure while physical disturbance produced limited impacts. The divergent results of this and previous mesocosm experiments, which found primarily interactive effects of the stressors, highlights the importance of undertaking field experiments that offer a greater element of realism. Furthermore, this study, in finding differing responses to stressors at the 2 sites, highlights the importance of environmental context in mediating effects.

KW - Context dependence

KW - Disturbance

KW - Field experiments

KW - Macrobenthos

KW - Microphytobenthos

KW - Multiple stressors

KW - Nutrient enrichment

U2 - 10.3354/meps11935

DO - 10.3354/meps11935

M3 - Article

VL - 562

SP - 37

EP - 51

JO - Marine Ecology Progress Series

JF - Marine Ecology Progress Series

SN - 0171-8630

ER -

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