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Re-thinking residential mobility: linking lives through time and space

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

While researchers are increasingly re-conceptualizing international migration, far less attention has been devoted to re-thinking short-distance residential mobility and immobility. In this paper we harness the life course approach to propose a new conceptual framework for residential mobility research. We contend that residential mobility and immobility should be re-conceptualized as relational practices that link lives through time and space while connecting people to structural conditions. Re-thinking and re-assessing residential mobility by exploiting new developments in longitudinal analysis will allow geographers to understand, critique and address pressing societal challenges.
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Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)352-374
Number of pages23
JournalProgress in Human Geography
Volume40
Issue number3
Early online date16 Mar 2015
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Jun 2016

    Research areas

  • Life course, Linked lives, Population geography, Practice, Relationality, Residential mobility

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