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Seeing the future: Natural image sequences produce “anticipatory” neuronal activity and bias perceptual report

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DOI

Standard

Seeing the future : Natural image sequences produce “anticipatory” neuronal activity and bias perceptual report. / Perrett, David Ian; Xiao, Dengke; Barraclough, Nicholas Edward; Keysers, Christian; Oram, Michael William.

In: The Quarterly Journal of Experimental Psychology, Vol. 62, No. 11, 2009, p. 2081-2104.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Harvard

Perrett, DI, Xiao, D, Barraclough, NE, Keysers, C & Oram, MW 2009, 'Seeing the future: Natural image sequences produce “anticipatory” neuronal activity and bias perceptual report' The Quarterly Journal of Experimental Psychology, vol 62, no. 11, pp. 2081-2104. DOI: 10.1080/17470210902959279

APA

Perrett, D. I., Xiao, D., Barraclough, N. E., Keysers, C., & Oram, M. W. (2009). Seeing the future: Natural image sequences produce “anticipatory” neuronal activity and bias perceptual report. The Quarterly Journal of Experimental Psychology, 62(11), 2081-2104. DOI: 10.1080/17470210902959279

Vancouver

Perrett DI, Xiao D, Barraclough NE, Keysers C, Oram MW. Seeing the future: Natural image sequences produce “anticipatory” neuronal activity and bias perceptual report. The Quarterly Journal of Experimental Psychology. 2009;62(11):2081-2104. Available from, DOI: 10.1080/17470210902959279

Author

Perrett, David Ian; Xiao, Dengke; Barraclough, Nicholas Edward; Keysers, Christian; Oram, Michael William / Seeing the future : Natural image sequences produce “anticipatory” neuronal activity and bias perceptual report.

In: The Quarterly Journal of Experimental Psychology, Vol. 62, No. 11, 2009, p. 2081-2104.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Bibtex - Download

@article{6d6d83af0b514501aa1e3c271700afe2,
title = "Seeing the future: Natural image sequences produce “anticipatory” neuronal activity and bias perceptual report",
abstract = "This paper relates human perception to the functioning of cells in the temporal cortex that are engaged in high-level pattern processing. We review historical developments concerning (a) the functional organization of cells processing faces and (b) the selectivity for faces in cell responses. We then focus on (c) the comparison of perception and cell responses to images of faces presented in sequences of unrelated images. Specifically the paper concerns the cell function and perception in circumstances where meaningful patterns occur momentarily in the context of a naturally or unnaturally changing visual environment. Experience of visual sequences allows anticipation, yet one sensory stimulus also “masks” perception and neural processing of subsequent stimuli. To understand this paradox we compared cell responses in monkey temporal cortex to body images presented individually, in pairs and in action sequences. Responses to one image suppressed responses to similar images for 500 ms. This suppression led to responses peaking 100 ms earlier to image sequences than to isolated images (e.g., during head rotation, face-selective activity peaks before the face confronts the observer). Thus forward masking has unrecognized benefits for perception because it can transform neuronal activity to make it predictive during natural change.",
author = "Perrett, {David Ian} and Dengke Xiao and Barraclough, {Nicholas Edward} and Christian Keysers and Oram, {Michael William}",
year = "2009",
doi = "10.1080/17470210902959279",
volume = "62",
pages = "2081--2104",
journal = "The Quarterly Journal of Experimental Psychology",
issn = "1747-0218",
publisher = "Psychology Press Ltd",
number = "11",

}

RIS (suitable for import to EndNote) - Download

TY - JOUR

T1 - Seeing the future

T2 - The Quarterly Journal of Experimental Psychology

AU - Perrett,David Ian

AU - Xiao,Dengke

AU - Barraclough,Nicholas Edward

AU - Keysers,Christian

AU - Oram,Michael William

PY - 2009

Y1 - 2009

N2 - This paper relates human perception to the functioning of cells in the temporal cortex that are engaged in high-level pattern processing. We review historical developments concerning (a) the functional organization of cells processing faces and (b) the selectivity for faces in cell responses. We then focus on (c) the comparison of perception and cell responses to images of faces presented in sequences of unrelated images. Specifically the paper concerns the cell function and perception in circumstances where meaningful patterns occur momentarily in the context of a naturally or unnaturally changing visual environment. Experience of visual sequences allows anticipation, yet one sensory stimulus also “masks” perception and neural processing of subsequent stimuli. To understand this paradox we compared cell responses in monkey temporal cortex to body images presented individually, in pairs and in action sequences. Responses to one image suppressed responses to similar images for 500 ms. This suppression led to responses peaking 100 ms earlier to image sequences than to isolated images (e.g., during head rotation, face-selective activity peaks before the face confronts the observer). Thus forward masking has unrecognized benefits for perception because it can transform neuronal activity to make it predictive during natural change.

AB - This paper relates human perception to the functioning of cells in the temporal cortex that are engaged in high-level pattern processing. We review historical developments concerning (a) the functional organization of cells processing faces and (b) the selectivity for faces in cell responses. We then focus on (c) the comparison of perception and cell responses to images of faces presented in sequences of unrelated images. Specifically the paper concerns the cell function and perception in circumstances where meaningful patterns occur momentarily in the context of a naturally or unnaturally changing visual environment. Experience of visual sequences allows anticipation, yet one sensory stimulus also “masks” perception and neural processing of subsequent stimuli. To understand this paradox we compared cell responses in monkey temporal cortex to body images presented individually, in pairs and in action sequences. Responses to one image suppressed responses to similar images for 500 ms. This suppression led to responses peaking 100 ms earlier to image sequences than to isolated images (e.g., during head rotation, face-selective activity peaks before the face confronts the observer). Thus forward masking has unrecognized benefits for perception because it can transform neuronal activity to make it predictive during natural change.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=70349548930&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1080/17470210902959279

DO - 10.1080/17470210902959279

M3 - Article

VL - 62

SP - 2081

EP - 2104

JO - The Quarterly Journal of Experimental Psychology

JF - The Quarterly Journal of Experimental Psychology

SN - 1747-0218

IS - 11

ER -

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