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Selective and contagious prosocial resource donation in capuchin monkeys, chimpanzees and humans

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Selective and contagious prosocial resource donation in capuchin monkeys, chimpanzees and humans. / Claidière, Nicolas; Whiten, Andrew; Mareno, Mary C; Messer, Emily J E; Brosnan, Sarah F; Hopper, Lydia M; Lambeth, Susan P; Schapiro, Steven J; McGuigan, Nicola.

In: Scientific Reports, Vol. 5, 7631, 01.2015.

Research output: Research - peer-reviewArticle

Harvard

Claidière, N, Whiten, A, Mareno, MC, Messer, EJE, Brosnan, SF, Hopper, LM, Lambeth, SP, Schapiro, SJ & McGuigan, N 2015, 'Selective and contagious prosocial resource donation in capuchin monkeys, chimpanzees and humans' Scientific Reports, vol 5, 7631. DOI: 10.1038/srep07631

APA

Claidière, N., Whiten, A., Mareno, M. C., Messer, E. J. E., Brosnan, S. F., Hopper, L. M., ... McGuigan, N. (2015). Selective and contagious prosocial resource donation in capuchin monkeys, chimpanzees and humans. Scientific Reports, 5, [7631]. DOI: 10.1038/srep07631

Vancouver

Claidière N, Whiten A, Mareno MC, Messer EJE, Brosnan SF, Hopper LM et al. Selective and contagious prosocial resource donation in capuchin monkeys, chimpanzees and humans. Scientific Reports. 2015 Jan;5. 7631. Available from, DOI: 10.1038/srep07631

Author

Claidière, Nicolas ; Whiten, Andrew ; Mareno, Mary C ; Messer, Emily J E ; Brosnan, Sarah F ; Hopper, Lydia M ; Lambeth, Susan P ; Schapiro, Steven J ; McGuigan, Nicola. / Selective and contagious prosocial resource donation in capuchin monkeys, chimpanzees and humans. In: Scientific Reports. 2015 ; Vol. 5.

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@article{1905aa0b05664c6b8243e3795456b8ea,
title = "Selective and contagious prosocial resource donation in capuchin monkeys, chimpanzees and humans",
abstract = "Prosocial acts benefitting others are widespread amongst humans. By contrast, chimpanzees have failed to demonstrate such a disposition in several studies, leading some authors to conclude that the forms of prosociality studied evolved in humans since our common ancestry. However, similar prosocial behavior has since been documented in other primates, such as capuchin monkeys. Here, applying the same methodology to humans, chimpanzees, and capuchins, we provide evidence that all three species will display prosocial behavior, but only in certain conditions. Fundamental forms of prosociality were age-dependent in children, conditional on self-beneficial resource distributions even at age seven, and conditional on social or resource configurations in chimpanzees and capuchins. We provide the first evidence that experience of conspecific companions' prosocial behavior facilitates prosocial behavior in children and chimpanzees. Prosocial actions were manifested in all three species following rules of contingency that may reflect strategically adaptive responses.",
author = "Nicolas Claidière and Andrew Whiten and Mareno, {Mary C} and Messer, {Emily J E} and Brosnan, {Sarah F} and Hopper, {Lydia M} and Lambeth, {Susan P} and Schapiro, {Steven J} and Nicola McGuigan",
note = "The project was supported by a grant from the John Templeton Foundation (Ref 20721) to AW.",
year = "2015",
month = "1",
doi = "10.1038/srep07631",
volume = "5",
journal = "Scientific Reports",
issn = "2045-2322",
publisher = "Nature publishing group",

}

RIS (suitable for import to EndNote) - Download

TY - JOUR

T1 - Selective and contagious prosocial resource donation in capuchin monkeys, chimpanzees and humans

AU - Claidière,Nicolas

AU - Whiten,Andrew

AU - Mareno,Mary C

AU - Messer,Emily J E

AU - Brosnan,Sarah F

AU - Hopper,Lydia M

AU - Lambeth,Susan P

AU - Schapiro,Steven J

AU - McGuigan,Nicola

N1 - The project was supported by a grant from the John Templeton Foundation (Ref 20721) to AW.

PY - 2015/1

Y1 - 2015/1

N2 - Prosocial acts benefitting others are widespread amongst humans. By contrast, chimpanzees have failed to demonstrate such a disposition in several studies, leading some authors to conclude that the forms of prosociality studied evolved in humans since our common ancestry. However, similar prosocial behavior has since been documented in other primates, such as capuchin monkeys. Here, applying the same methodology to humans, chimpanzees, and capuchins, we provide evidence that all three species will display prosocial behavior, but only in certain conditions. Fundamental forms of prosociality were age-dependent in children, conditional on self-beneficial resource distributions even at age seven, and conditional on social or resource configurations in chimpanzees and capuchins. We provide the first evidence that experience of conspecific companions' prosocial behavior facilitates prosocial behavior in children and chimpanzees. Prosocial actions were manifested in all three species following rules of contingency that may reflect strategically adaptive responses.

AB - Prosocial acts benefitting others are widespread amongst humans. By contrast, chimpanzees have failed to demonstrate such a disposition in several studies, leading some authors to conclude that the forms of prosociality studied evolved in humans since our common ancestry. However, similar prosocial behavior has since been documented in other primates, such as capuchin monkeys. Here, applying the same methodology to humans, chimpanzees, and capuchins, we provide evidence that all three species will display prosocial behavior, but only in certain conditions. Fundamental forms of prosociality were age-dependent in children, conditional on self-beneficial resource distributions even at age seven, and conditional on social or resource configurations in chimpanzees and capuchins. We provide the first evidence that experience of conspecific companions' prosocial behavior facilitates prosocial behavior in children and chimpanzees. Prosocial actions were manifested in all three species following rules of contingency that may reflect strategically adaptive responses.

UR - http://www.nature.com/srep/2015/150106/srep07631/full/srep07631.html#supplementary-information

U2 - 10.1038/srep07631

DO - 10.1038/srep07631

M3 - Article

VL - 5

JO - Scientific Reports

T2 - Scientific Reports

JF - Scientific Reports

SN - 2045-2322

M1 - 7631

ER -

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