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Sex and pairing status impact how zebra finches use social information in foraging

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Many factors, including the demonstrator’s sex, status, and familiarity, shape the nature and magnitude of social learning. Given the important role of pair bonds in socially-monogamous animals, we predicted that these intimate relationships would promote the use of social information, and tested this hypothesis in zebra finches (Taeniopygia guttata). Observer birds witnessed either their mate or another familiar, opposite-sex bird eat from one, but not a second novel food source, before being allowed to feed from both food sources themselves. Birds used social information to make foraging decisions, but not all individuals used this information in the same way. While most individuals copied the foraging choice of the demonstrator as predicted, paired males did not, instead avoiding the feeder demonstrated by their mate. Our findings reveal that sex and pairing status interact to influence the use of social information and suggest that paired males might use social information to avoid competing with their mate.
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Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)38-42
Number of pages5
JournalBehavioural Processes
Volume139
Early online date21 Dec 2016
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 2017

    Research areas

  • Monogamy, Pair-bond, Social information, Social learning

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  1. Behavioural Processes (Journal)

    Healy, S. D. (Editor)
    1 Sep 201431 Dec 2014

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  2. Behavioural Processes (Journal)

    Healy, S. D. (Member of editorial board)
    2010 → …

    Activity: Publication peer-review and editorial workEditor of research journal

ID: 248483777