Skip to content

Research at St Andrews

Sexual conflict, sex allocation and the genetic system

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

DOI

Author(s)

David Michael Shuker, Anna M. Moynihan, Laura Ross

School/Research organisations

Abstract

Decisions over what sex ratio to produce can have far-reaching evolutionary consequences, for both offspring and parents. However, the extent to which males and females come into evolutionary conflict over aspects of sex allocation depends on the genetic system: when genes are passed to the next generation unequally by the two sexes (as in haplodiploidy, for example), this biased transmission can facilitate a range of conflicts not seen in diploids. However, much less attention has been paid to these forms of sexual conflict, not least because it has not always been clear how the conflicts could be realized. Here we consider how biased gene transmission, as expressed in different genetic systems, enhances the opportunity for sex ratio conflict and give empirical examples that confirm that males and females have the opportunity to influence sex ratios.
Close

Details

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)682-685
Number of pages4
JournalBiology Letters
Volume5
Issue number5
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 23 Oct 2009

    Research areas

  • sexual conflict, sex allocation, sex ratio, nasonia, hymenoptera, WASP NASONIA-VITRIPENNIS, SOCIAL HYMENOPTERA, RATIO CONFLICT, EVOLUTION

Discover related content
Find related publications, people, projects and more using interactive charts.

View graph of relations

Related by author

  1. Context-dependent use of visual cues in the shell selection behaviour of the hermit crab Pagurus bernhardus

    Rimmer, J. E. V., Todd, C. D. & Shuker, D. M., Jul 2021, In: Behavioural Processes. 188, 104414.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

  2. The rationality of decisions depends on behavioural context

    Glaser, G. L., Miller, M. C., Healy, S. D. & Shuker, D. M., 5 Dec 2020, In: Behavioural Processes. In-press, 104293.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

  3. Same-sex sexual behaviour

    Balfour, V. L. & Shuker, D. M., 16 Nov 2020, In: Current Biology. 30, 22, p. R1345-R1346

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

  4. A single pleiotropic locus influences the rate of hybridization between two sibling species of Lygaeus bugs

    Balfour, V., Black, D. & Shuker, D. M., Nov 2020, In: Ecology and Evolution. 10, 21, p. 12224-12232 9 p.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

  5. Genomics of sex allocation in the parasitoid wasp Nasonia vitripennis

    Pannebakker, B. A., Cook, N., van den Heuvel, J., van de Zande, L. & Shuker, D. M., 20 Jul 2020, In: BMC Genomics. 21, 14 p., 499.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Related by journal

  1. Biology Letters (Journal)

    Graeme Douglas Ruxton (Editor)

    2012 → …

    Activity: Publication peer-review and editorial work typesEditor of research journal

  2. Biology Letters (Journal)

    Karen Anne Spencer (Member of editorial board)

    1 Apr 2011

    Activity: Publication peer-review and editorial work typesEditor of research journal

  3. Biology Letters (Journal)

    David Michael Shuker (Member of editorial board)

    2011

    Activity: Publication peer-review and editorial work typesEditor of research journal

  4. Biology Letters (Journal)

    Richard William Byrne (Member of editorial board)

    20072012

    Activity: Publication peer-review and editorial work typesEditor of research journal

  5. Biology Letters (Journal)

    Josep Call (Member of editorial board)

    20072013

    Activity: Publication peer-review and editorial work typesEditor of research journal

Related by journal

  1. Adaptation of sperm whales to open-boat whalers: rapid social learning on a large scale?

    Whitehead, H., Smith, T. D. & Rendell, L., 17 Mar 2021, In: Biology Letters. 17, 3, 5 p., 20210030.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

  2. Can behaviour impede evolution? Persistence of singing effort after morphological song loss in crickets

    Rayner, J. G., Schneider, W. & Bailey, N. W., Jun 2020, In: Biology Letters. 16, 6, 5 p., 20190931.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

  3. Chimpanzee lip-smacks confirm primate continuity for speech-rhythm evolution

    Pereira, A. S., Kavanagh, E., Hobaiter, C., Slocombe, K. E. & R. Lameira, A., 27 May 2020, In: Biology Letters. 16, 5, 20200232.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

  4. Does kin discrimination promote cooperation?

    Faria, G. & Gardner, A., Mar 2020, In: Biology Letters. 16, 3, 4 p., 20190742.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

  5. Examining the mechanisms underlying the acquisition of animal tool behaviour

    Bandini, E., Motes-Rodrigo, A., Steele, M. P., Rutz, C. & Tennie, C., 24 Jun 2020, In: Biology Letters. 16, 6, 6 p., 20200122.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

ID: 459333

Top