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Short- and long-term changes in right whale calling behavior: The potential effects of noise on acoustic communication

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

DOI

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Short- and long-term changes in right whale calling behavior: The potential effects of noise on acoustic communication. / Parks, Susan E.; Clark, C. W.; Tyack, P. L.

In: Journal of the Acoustical Society of America, Vol. 122, No. 6, 12.2007, p. 3725-3731.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Harvard

Parks, SE, Clark, CW & Tyack, PL 2007, 'Short- and long-term changes in right whale calling behavior: The potential effects of noise on acoustic communication', Journal of the Acoustical Society of America, vol. 122, no. 6, pp. 3725-3731. https://doi.org/10.1121/1.2799904

APA

Parks, S. E., Clark, C. W., & Tyack, P. L. (2007). Short- and long-term changes in right whale calling behavior: The potential effects of noise on acoustic communication. Journal of the Acoustical Society of America, 122(6), 3725-3731. https://doi.org/10.1121/1.2799904

Vancouver

Parks SE, Clark CW, Tyack PL. Short- and long-term changes in right whale calling behavior: The potential effects of noise on acoustic communication. Journal of the Acoustical Society of America. 2007 Dec;122(6):3725-3731. https://doi.org/10.1121/1.2799904

Author

Parks, Susan E. ; Clark, C. W. ; Tyack, P. L. / Short- and long-term changes in right whale calling behavior: The potential effects of noise on acoustic communication. In: Journal of the Acoustical Society of America. 2007 ; Vol. 122, No. 6. pp. 3725-3731.

Bibtex - Download

@article{a780adab06064d469db72e07cbe2ef92,
title = "Short- and long-term changes in right whale calling behavior: The potential effects of noise on acoustic communication",
abstract = "The impact of anthropogenic noise on marine mammals has been an area of increasing concern over the past two decades. Most low-frequency anthropogenic noise in the ocean comes from commercial shipping which has contributed to an increase in ocean background noise over the past 150 years. The long-term impacts of these changes on marine mammals are not well understood. This paper describes both short- and long-term behavioral changes in calls produced by the endangered North Atlantic right whale (Eubalaena glacialis) and South Atlantic right whale (Eubalaena australis) in the presence of increased low-frequency noise. Right whales produce calls with a higher average fundamental frequency and they call at a lower rate in high noise conditions, possibly in response to masking from low-frequency noise. The long-term changes have occurred within the known lifespan of individual whales, indicating that a behavioral change, rather than selective pressure, has resulted in the observed differences. This study provides evidence of a behavioral change in sound production of right whales that is correlated with increased noise levels and indicates that right whales may shift call frequency to compensate for increased band-limited background noise. (c) 2007 Acoustical Society of America.",
author = "Parks, {Susan E.} and Clark, {C. W.} and Tyack, {P. L.}",
year = "2007",
month = "12",
doi = "10.1121/1.2799904",
language = "English",
volume = "122",
pages = "3725--3731",
journal = "Journal of the Acoustical Society of America",
issn = "0001-4966",
publisher = "Acoustical Society of America",
number = "6",

}

RIS (suitable for import to EndNote) - Download

TY - JOUR

T1 - Short- and long-term changes in right whale calling behavior: The potential effects of noise on acoustic communication

AU - Parks, Susan E.

AU - Clark, C. W.

AU - Tyack, P. L.

PY - 2007/12

Y1 - 2007/12

N2 - The impact of anthropogenic noise on marine mammals has been an area of increasing concern over the past two decades. Most low-frequency anthropogenic noise in the ocean comes from commercial shipping which has contributed to an increase in ocean background noise over the past 150 years. The long-term impacts of these changes on marine mammals are not well understood. This paper describes both short- and long-term behavioral changes in calls produced by the endangered North Atlantic right whale (Eubalaena glacialis) and South Atlantic right whale (Eubalaena australis) in the presence of increased low-frequency noise. Right whales produce calls with a higher average fundamental frequency and they call at a lower rate in high noise conditions, possibly in response to masking from low-frequency noise. The long-term changes have occurred within the known lifespan of individual whales, indicating that a behavioral change, rather than selective pressure, has resulted in the observed differences. This study provides evidence of a behavioral change in sound production of right whales that is correlated with increased noise levels and indicates that right whales may shift call frequency to compensate for increased band-limited background noise. (c) 2007 Acoustical Society of America.

AB - The impact of anthropogenic noise on marine mammals has been an area of increasing concern over the past two decades. Most low-frequency anthropogenic noise in the ocean comes from commercial shipping which has contributed to an increase in ocean background noise over the past 150 years. The long-term impacts of these changes on marine mammals are not well understood. This paper describes both short- and long-term behavioral changes in calls produced by the endangered North Atlantic right whale (Eubalaena glacialis) and South Atlantic right whale (Eubalaena australis) in the presence of increased low-frequency noise. Right whales produce calls with a higher average fundamental frequency and they call at a lower rate in high noise conditions, possibly in response to masking from low-frequency noise. The long-term changes have occurred within the known lifespan of individual whales, indicating that a behavioral change, rather than selective pressure, has resulted in the observed differences. This study provides evidence of a behavioral change in sound production of right whales that is correlated with increased noise levels and indicates that right whales may shift call frequency to compensate for increased band-limited background noise. (c) 2007 Acoustical Society of America.

U2 - 10.1121/1.2799904

DO - 10.1121/1.2799904

M3 - Article

VL - 122

SP - 3725

EP - 3731

JO - Journal of the Acoustical Society of America

JF - Journal of the Acoustical Society of America

SN - 0001-4966

IS - 6

ER -

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