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Sperm whale behaviour indicates the use of echolocation click buzzes 'creaks' in prey capture

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Sperm whale behaviour indicates the use of echolocation click buzzes 'creaks' in prey capture. / Miller, Patrick; Johnson, Mark; Tyack, Peter Lloyd.

In: Proceedings of the Royal Society of London Series B: Biological Sciences, Vol. 271, No. 1554, 07.11.2004, p. 2239-2247.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Harvard

Miller, P, Johnson, M & Tyack, PL 2004, 'Sperm whale behaviour indicates the use of echolocation click buzzes 'creaks' in prey capture' Proceedings of the Royal Society of London Series B: Biological Sciences, vol. 271, no. 1554, pp. 2239-2247. https://doi.org/10.1098/rspb.2004.2863

APA

Miller, P., Johnson, M., & Tyack, P. L. (2004). Sperm whale behaviour indicates the use of echolocation click buzzes 'creaks' in prey capture. Proceedings of the Royal Society of London Series B: Biological Sciences, 271(1554), 2239-2247. https://doi.org/10.1098/rspb.2004.2863

Vancouver

Miller P, Johnson M, Tyack PL. Sperm whale behaviour indicates the use of echolocation click buzzes 'creaks' in prey capture. Proceedings of the Royal Society of London Series B: Biological Sciences. 2004 Nov 7;271(1554):2239-2247. https://doi.org/10.1098/rspb.2004.2863

Author

Miller, Patrick ; Johnson, Mark ; Tyack, Peter Lloyd. / Sperm whale behaviour indicates the use of echolocation click buzzes 'creaks' in prey capture. In: Proceedings of the Royal Society of London Series B: Biological Sciences. 2004 ; Vol. 271, No. 1554. pp. 2239-2247.

Bibtex - Download

@article{ce1fe48ba9bf40129304a1f4c2e48bd1,
title = "Sperm whale behaviour indicates the use of echolocation click buzzes 'creaks' in prey capture",
abstract = "During foraging dives, sperm whales (Physeter macrocephalus) produce long series of regular clicks at 0.5-2 s intervals interspersed with rapid-click buzzes called 'creaks'. Sound, depth and orientation recording Dtags were attached to 23 whales in the Ligurian Sea and Gulf of Mexico to test whether the behaviour of diving sperm whales supports the hypothesis that creaks are produced during prey capture. Sperm whales spent most of their bottom time within one or two depth bands, apparently feeding in vertically stratified prey layers. Creak rates were highest during the bottom phase: 99.8{\%} of creaks were produced in the deepest 50{\%} of dives, 57{\%} in the deepest 15{\%} of dives. Whales swam actively during the bottom phase, producing a mean of 12.5 depth inflections per dive. A mean of 32{\%} of creaks produced during the bottom phase occurred within 10 s of an inflection (13 x more than chance). Sperm whales actively altered their body orientation throughout the bottom phase with significantly increased rates of change during creaks, reflecting increased manoeuvring. Sperm whales increased their bottom foraging time when creak rates were higher. These results all strongly support the hypothesis that creaks are an echolocation signal adapted for foraging, analogous to terminal buzzes in taxonomically diverse echolocating species.",
keywords = "foraging, echolocation, sperm whale, diving, PHYSETER-MACROCEPHALUS, GALAPAGOS-ISLANDS, STOMACH CONTENTS, DIVING BEHAVIOR, MARINE MAMMALS, TAG, SEA, COMMUNICATION, GREENLAND, SONAR",
author = "Patrick Miller and Mark Johnson and Tyack, {Peter Lloyd}",
year = "2004",
month = "11",
day = "7",
doi = "10.1098/rspb.2004.2863",
language = "English",
volume = "271",
pages = "2239--2247",
journal = "Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences",
issn = "0962-8452",
publisher = "Royal Society of London",
number = "1554",

}

RIS (suitable for import to EndNote) - Download

TY - JOUR

T1 - Sperm whale behaviour indicates the use of echolocation click buzzes 'creaks' in prey capture

AU - Miller, Patrick

AU - Johnson, Mark

AU - Tyack, Peter Lloyd

PY - 2004/11/7

Y1 - 2004/11/7

N2 - During foraging dives, sperm whales (Physeter macrocephalus) produce long series of regular clicks at 0.5-2 s intervals interspersed with rapid-click buzzes called 'creaks'. Sound, depth and orientation recording Dtags were attached to 23 whales in the Ligurian Sea and Gulf of Mexico to test whether the behaviour of diving sperm whales supports the hypothesis that creaks are produced during prey capture. Sperm whales spent most of their bottom time within one or two depth bands, apparently feeding in vertically stratified prey layers. Creak rates were highest during the bottom phase: 99.8% of creaks were produced in the deepest 50% of dives, 57% in the deepest 15% of dives. Whales swam actively during the bottom phase, producing a mean of 12.5 depth inflections per dive. A mean of 32% of creaks produced during the bottom phase occurred within 10 s of an inflection (13 x more than chance). Sperm whales actively altered their body orientation throughout the bottom phase with significantly increased rates of change during creaks, reflecting increased manoeuvring. Sperm whales increased their bottom foraging time when creak rates were higher. These results all strongly support the hypothesis that creaks are an echolocation signal adapted for foraging, analogous to terminal buzzes in taxonomically diverse echolocating species.

AB - During foraging dives, sperm whales (Physeter macrocephalus) produce long series of regular clicks at 0.5-2 s intervals interspersed with rapid-click buzzes called 'creaks'. Sound, depth and orientation recording Dtags were attached to 23 whales in the Ligurian Sea and Gulf of Mexico to test whether the behaviour of diving sperm whales supports the hypothesis that creaks are produced during prey capture. Sperm whales spent most of their bottom time within one or two depth bands, apparently feeding in vertically stratified prey layers. Creak rates were highest during the bottom phase: 99.8% of creaks were produced in the deepest 50% of dives, 57% in the deepest 15% of dives. Whales swam actively during the bottom phase, producing a mean of 12.5 depth inflections per dive. A mean of 32% of creaks produced during the bottom phase occurred within 10 s of an inflection (13 x more than chance). Sperm whales actively altered their body orientation throughout the bottom phase with significantly increased rates of change during creaks, reflecting increased manoeuvring. Sperm whales increased their bottom foraging time when creak rates were higher. These results all strongly support the hypothesis that creaks are an echolocation signal adapted for foraging, analogous to terminal buzzes in taxonomically diverse echolocating species.

KW - foraging

KW - echolocation

KW - sperm whale

KW - diving

KW - PHYSETER-MACROCEPHALUS

KW - GALAPAGOS-ISLANDS

KW - STOMACH CONTENTS

KW - DIVING BEHAVIOR

KW - MARINE MAMMALS

KW - TAG

KW - SEA

KW - COMMUNICATION

KW - GREENLAND

KW - SONAR

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=16644387735&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1098/rspb.2004.2863

DO - 10.1098/rspb.2004.2863

M3 - Article

VL - 271

SP - 2239

EP - 2247

JO - Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences

T2 - Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences

JF - Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences

SN - 0962-8452

IS - 1554

ER -

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ID: 363795