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Synchrony and motor mimicking in chimpanzee observational learning

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Synchrony and motor mimicking in chimpanzee observational learning. / Fuhrmann, Delia; Ravignani, Andrea; Marshall-Pescini, Sarah; Whiten, Andrew.

In: Scientific Reports, Vol. 4, 5283, 13.06.2014.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Fuhrmann, D, Ravignani, A, Marshall-Pescini, S & Whiten, A 2014, 'Synchrony and motor mimicking in chimpanzee observational learning' Scientific Reports, vol 4, 5283. DOI: 10.1038/srep05283

APA

Fuhrmann, D., Ravignani, A., Marshall-Pescini, S., & Whiten, A. (2014). Synchrony and motor mimicking in chimpanzee observational learning. Scientific Reports, 4, [5283]. DOI: 10.1038/srep05283

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Fuhrmann D, Ravignani A, Marshall-Pescini S, Whiten A. Synchrony and motor mimicking in chimpanzee observational learning. Scientific Reports. 2014 Jun 13;4. 5283. Available from, DOI: 10.1038/srep05283

Author

Fuhrmann, Delia; Ravignani, Andrea; Marshall-Pescini, Sarah; Whiten, Andrew / Synchrony and motor mimicking in chimpanzee observational learning.

In: Scientific Reports, Vol. 4, 5283, 13.06.2014.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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@article{28f4abca95b04e9b9ba6ec23e8108ab9,
title = "Synchrony and motor mimicking in chimpanzee observational learning",
abstract = "Cumulative tool-based culture underwrote our species' evolutionary success, and tool-based nut-cracking is one of the strongest candidates for cultural transmission in our closest relatives, chimpanzees. However the social learning processes that may explain both the similarities and differences between the species remain unclear. A previous study of nut-cracking by initially naive chimpanzees suggested that a learning chimpanzee holding no hammer nevertheless replicated hammering actions it witnessed. This observation has potentially important implications for the nature of the social learning processes and underlying motor coding involved. In the present study, model and observer actions were quantified frame-by-frame and analysed with stringent statistical methods, demonstrating synchrony between the observer's and model's movements, cross-correlation of these movements above chance level and a unidirectional transmission process from model to observer. These results provide the first quantitative evidence for motor mimicking underlain by motor coding in apes, with implications for mirror neuron function.",
keywords = "Mirror neurons, Wild chimpanzees, Nut-cracking, Imitation, Culture, Behavior, Apes, Coordination, Transmission, Inhibition",
author = "Delia Fuhrmann and Andrea Ravignani and Sarah Marshall-Pescini and Andrew Whiten",
note = "A.R. was supported by ERC Advanced Grant 230604 SOMACCA to W. Tecumseh Fitch. SMP was supported by funding from the European Research Council under the European Union's Seventh Framework Programme (FP/2007-2013)/ERC Grant Agreement n. [311870].",
year = "2014",
month = "6",
doi = "10.1038/srep05283",
volume = "4",
journal = "Scientific Reports",
issn = "2045-2322",
publisher = "Nature publishing group",

}

RIS (suitable for import to EndNote) - Download

TY - JOUR

T1 - Synchrony and motor mimicking in chimpanzee observational learning

AU - Fuhrmann,Delia

AU - Ravignani,Andrea

AU - Marshall-Pescini,Sarah

AU - Whiten,Andrew

N1 - A.R. was supported by ERC Advanced Grant 230604 SOMACCA to W. Tecumseh Fitch. SMP was supported by funding from the European Research Council under the European Union's Seventh Framework Programme (FP/2007-2013)/ERC Grant Agreement n. [311870].

PY - 2014/6/13

Y1 - 2014/6/13

N2 - Cumulative tool-based culture underwrote our species' evolutionary success, and tool-based nut-cracking is one of the strongest candidates for cultural transmission in our closest relatives, chimpanzees. However the social learning processes that may explain both the similarities and differences between the species remain unclear. A previous study of nut-cracking by initially naive chimpanzees suggested that a learning chimpanzee holding no hammer nevertheless replicated hammering actions it witnessed. This observation has potentially important implications for the nature of the social learning processes and underlying motor coding involved. In the present study, model and observer actions were quantified frame-by-frame and analysed with stringent statistical methods, demonstrating synchrony between the observer's and model's movements, cross-correlation of these movements above chance level and a unidirectional transmission process from model to observer. These results provide the first quantitative evidence for motor mimicking underlain by motor coding in apes, with implications for mirror neuron function.

AB - Cumulative tool-based culture underwrote our species' evolutionary success, and tool-based nut-cracking is one of the strongest candidates for cultural transmission in our closest relatives, chimpanzees. However the social learning processes that may explain both the similarities and differences between the species remain unclear. A previous study of nut-cracking by initially naive chimpanzees suggested that a learning chimpanzee holding no hammer nevertheless replicated hammering actions it witnessed. This observation has potentially important implications for the nature of the social learning processes and underlying motor coding involved. In the present study, model and observer actions were quantified frame-by-frame and analysed with stringent statistical methods, demonstrating synchrony between the observer's and model's movements, cross-correlation of these movements above chance level and a unidirectional transmission process from model to observer. These results provide the first quantitative evidence for motor mimicking underlain by motor coding in apes, with implications for mirror neuron function.

KW - Mirror neurons

KW - Wild chimpanzees

KW - Nut-cracking

KW - Imitation

KW - Culture

KW - Behavior

KW - Apes

KW - Coordination

KW - Transmission

KW - Inhibition

UR - http://www.nature.com/srep/2014/140613/srep05283/full/srep05283.html#/supplementary-information

U2 - 10.1038/srep05283

DO - 10.1038/srep05283

M3 - Article

VL - 4

JO - Scientific Reports

T2 - Scientific Reports

JF - Scientific Reports

SN - 2045-2322

M1 - 5283

ER -

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