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Research at St Andrews

The broken dream of pervasive sentient ambient calm invisible ubiquitous computing

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Author(s)

Matthew P. Aylett, Aaron John Quigley

School/Research organisations

Abstract

We dreamt of technology becoming invisible, for our wants and needs to be primary and the tools we use for making them a reality to become like a genie, a snap of the fingers and ta daa, everything is realised. What went wrong? Was this always an impossible dream? How did we end up with this fetishised obsession with mobile phones? How did we end up with technology tearing apart our sense of experience and replacing it with 'Likes'. No one meant this to happen, not even US Corporates, they just wanted to own us, not diminish our sense of existing and interacting within the real world. In this paper we consider how tools took over, and how the dream of ubiquitous (or whatever its called) computing was destroyed. We rally rebellious forces and consider how we might fight back, and whether we should even bother trying.
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Details

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationCHI EA '15 Proceedings of the 33rd Annual ACM Conference Extended Abstracts on Human Factors in Computing Systems
Place of PublicationNew York
PublisherACM
Pages425-435
Number of pages10
ISBN (Electronic)9781450331463
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 18 Apr 2015
EventThe 33rd Annual CHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems (CHI) - COEX Convention & Exhibition Center, Seoul, Korea, Republic of
Duration: 18 Apr 201523 Apr 2015
http://chi2015.acm.org/

Conference

ConferenceThe 33rd Annual CHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems (CHI)
Abbreviated titleCHI2015
CountryKorea, Republic of
CitySeoul
Period18/04/1523/04/15
Internet address

    Research areas

  • Pervasive computing, Ubiquitous computing, Calm computing

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ID: 190337696

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