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The Deepwater Horizon oil spill marine mammal injury assessment

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The Deepwater Horizon oil spill marine mammal injury assessment. / Takeshita, Ryan; Sullivan, Laurie; Smith, Cynthia; Collier, Tracy; Hall, Ailsa; Brosnan, Tom; Rowles, Teri; Schwacke, Lori.

In: Endangered Species Research, Vol. 33, 31.01.2017, p. 95-106.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

Harvard

Takeshita, R, Sullivan, L, Smith, C, Collier, T, Hall, A, Brosnan, T, Rowles, T & Schwacke, L 2017, 'The Deepwater Horizon oil spill marine mammal injury assessment', Endangered Species Research, vol. 33, pp. 95-106. https://doi.org/10.3354/esr00808

APA

Takeshita, R., Sullivan, L., Smith, C., Collier, T., Hall, A., Brosnan, T., ... Schwacke, L. (2017). The Deepwater Horizon oil spill marine mammal injury assessment. Endangered Species Research, 33, 95-106. https://doi.org/10.3354/esr00808

Vancouver

Takeshita R, Sullivan L, Smith C, Collier T, Hall A, Brosnan T et al. The Deepwater Horizon oil spill marine mammal injury assessment. Endangered Species Research. 2017 Jan 31;33:95-106. https://doi.org/10.3354/esr00808

Author

Takeshita, Ryan ; Sullivan, Laurie ; Smith, Cynthia ; Collier, Tracy ; Hall, Ailsa ; Brosnan, Tom ; Rowles, Teri ; Schwacke, Lori. / The Deepwater Horizon oil spill marine mammal injury assessment. In: Endangered Species Research. 2017 ; Vol. 33. pp. 95-106.

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@article{f6f89522dff64ccbab8aae9ab3ac73cc,
title = "The Deepwater Horizon oil spill marine mammal injury assessment",
abstract = "From 2010 to 2015, a team of scientists studied how the BP Deepwater Horizon (DWH) oil spill affected marine mammals inhabiting the northern Gulf of Mexico, as part of the DWH Natural Resource Damage Assessment process. The scientists conducted the assessment on behalf of the DWH co-Trustees, with the purpose of investigating whether marine mammals were exposed to DWH oil and what types of injuries they suffered as a result of the DWH oil exposure, and then quantifying those injuries to determine the appropriate amount of restoration required to offset the injuries. Photographs, aerial surveys, spatial analyses of the co-occurrence between surface slick and cetacean populations, and chemical fingerprinting of oiled and stranded carcasses all confirm that at least 15 cetacean species were exposed to the DWH surface slick. Cetaceans that encountered the slick likely inhaled, aspirated, ingested, and/or adsorbed oil. In this Theme Section, marine mammal biologists, statisticians, veterinarians, toxicologists, and epidemiologists describe and quantify the adverse effects of this oil exposure. Taken together, this combination of oil spill dynamics, veterinary assessments, pathological, spatial, and temporal analyses of stranded animals, stock identification techniques, population dynamics, and a broad set of coordinated modeling efforts is an unprecedented assessment of how a major oil spill impacted a large and complex marine mammal community and their connected habitats.",
keywords = "Deepwater horizon, Exposure, Injury assessment, Marine mammals, Natural resource damage assessment, Oil, Petroleum",
author = "Ryan Takeshita and Laurie Sullivan and Cynthia Smith and Tracy Collier and Ailsa Hall and Tom Brosnan and Teri Rowles and Lori Schwacke",
note = "The studies described here were conducted as part of the DWH NRDA and included scientists funded through NOAA, other federal and state Trustees, and BP PLC. The John H. Prescott Marine Mammal Rescue Assistance Grant Program and the Marine Mammal Health and Stranding Response Program provided funding for this work in addition to the funding from the DWH NRDA.",
year = "2017",
month = "1",
day = "31",
doi = "10.3354/esr00808",
language = "English",
volume = "33",
pages = "95--106",
journal = "Endangered Species Research",
issn = "1863-5407",
publisher = "Inter-Research",

}

RIS (suitable for import to EndNote) - Download

TY - JOUR

T1 - The Deepwater Horizon oil spill marine mammal injury assessment

AU - Takeshita, Ryan

AU - Sullivan, Laurie

AU - Smith, Cynthia

AU - Collier, Tracy

AU - Hall, Ailsa

AU - Brosnan, Tom

AU - Rowles, Teri

AU - Schwacke, Lori

N1 - The studies described here were conducted as part of the DWH NRDA and included scientists funded through NOAA, other federal and state Trustees, and BP PLC. The John H. Prescott Marine Mammal Rescue Assistance Grant Program and the Marine Mammal Health and Stranding Response Program provided funding for this work in addition to the funding from the DWH NRDA.

PY - 2017/1/31

Y1 - 2017/1/31

N2 - From 2010 to 2015, a team of scientists studied how the BP Deepwater Horizon (DWH) oil spill affected marine mammals inhabiting the northern Gulf of Mexico, as part of the DWH Natural Resource Damage Assessment process. The scientists conducted the assessment on behalf of the DWH co-Trustees, with the purpose of investigating whether marine mammals were exposed to DWH oil and what types of injuries they suffered as a result of the DWH oil exposure, and then quantifying those injuries to determine the appropriate amount of restoration required to offset the injuries. Photographs, aerial surveys, spatial analyses of the co-occurrence between surface slick and cetacean populations, and chemical fingerprinting of oiled and stranded carcasses all confirm that at least 15 cetacean species were exposed to the DWH surface slick. Cetaceans that encountered the slick likely inhaled, aspirated, ingested, and/or adsorbed oil. In this Theme Section, marine mammal biologists, statisticians, veterinarians, toxicologists, and epidemiologists describe and quantify the adverse effects of this oil exposure. Taken together, this combination of oil spill dynamics, veterinary assessments, pathological, spatial, and temporal analyses of stranded animals, stock identification techniques, population dynamics, and a broad set of coordinated modeling efforts is an unprecedented assessment of how a major oil spill impacted a large and complex marine mammal community and their connected habitats.

AB - From 2010 to 2015, a team of scientists studied how the BP Deepwater Horizon (DWH) oil spill affected marine mammals inhabiting the northern Gulf of Mexico, as part of the DWH Natural Resource Damage Assessment process. The scientists conducted the assessment on behalf of the DWH co-Trustees, with the purpose of investigating whether marine mammals were exposed to DWH oil and what types of injuries they suffered as a result of the DWH oil exposure, and then quantifying those injuries to determine the appropriate amount of restoration required to offset the injuries. Photographs, aerial surveys, spatial analyses of the co-occurrence between surface slick and cetacean populations, and chemical fingerprinting of oiled and stranded carcasses all confirm that at least 15 cetacean species were exposed to the DWH surface slick. Cetaceans that encountered the slick likely inhaled, aspirated, ingested, and/or adsorbed oil. In this Theme Section, marine mammal biologists, statisticians, veterinarians, toxicologists, and epidemiologists describe and quantify the adverse effects of this oil exposure. Taken together, this combination of oil spill dynamics, veterinary assessments, pathological, spatial, and temporal analyses of stranded animals, stock identification techniques, population dynamics, and a broad set of coordinated modeling efforts is an unprecedented assessment of how a major oil spill impacted a large and complex marine mammal community and their connected habitats.

KW - Deepwater horizon

KW - Exposure

KW - Injury assessment

KW - Marine mammals

KW - Natural resource damage assessment

KW - Oil

KW - Petroleum

U2 - 10.3354/esr00808

DO - 10.3354/esr00808

M3 - Review article

VL - 33

SP - 95

EP - 106

JO - Endangered Species Research

JF - Endangered Species Research

SN - 1863-5407

ER -

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