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The devil is in the detail: quantifying vocal variation in a complex, multi-levelled, and rapidly evolving display

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The devil is in the detail : quantifying vocal variation in a complex, multi-levelled, and rapidly evolving display. / Garland, Ellen C.; Rendell, Luke; Lilley, Matthew S.; Poole, M. Michael; Allen, Jenny; Noad, Michael J.

In: Journal of the Acoustical Society of America, Vol. 142, No. 1, 31.07.2017, p. 460-472.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Harvard

Garland, EC, Rendell, L, Lilley, MS, Poole, MM, Allen, J & Noad, MJ 2017, 'The devil is in the detail: quantifying vocal variation in a complex, multi-levelled, and rapidly evolving display' Journal of the Acoustical Society of America, vol. 142, no. 1, pp. 460-472. https://doi.org/10.1121/1.4991320

APA

Garland, E. C., Rendell, L., Lilley, M. S., Poole, M. M., Allen, J., & Noad, M. J. (2017). The devil is in the detail: quantifying vocal variation in a complex, multi-levelled, and rapidly evolving display. Journal of the Acoustical Society of America, 142(1), 460-472. https://doi.org/10.1121/1.4991320

Vancouver

Garland EC, Rendell L, Lilley MS, Poole MM, Allen J, Noad MJ. The devil is in the detail: quantifying vocal variation in a complex, multi-levelled, and rapidly evolving display. Journal of the Acoustical Society of America. 2017 Jul 31;142(1):460-472. https://doi.org/10.1121/1.4991320

Author

Garland, Ellen C. ; Rendell, Luke ; Lilley, Matthew S. ; Poole, M. Michael ; Allen, Jenny ; Noad, Michael J. / The devil is in the detail : quantifying vocal variation in a complex, multi-levelled, and rapidly evolving display. In: Journal of the Acoustical Society of America. 2017 ; Vol. 142, No. 1. pp. 460-472.

Bibtex - Download

@article{a9e88d2091b446949ba0f18f890d79bd,
title = "The devil is in the detail: quantifying vocal variation in a complex, multi-levelled, and rapidly evolving display",
abstract = "Identifying and quantifying variation in vocalizations is fundamental to advancing our understanding of processes such as speciation, sexual selection, and cultural evolution. The song of the humpback whale (Megaptera novaeangliae) presents an extreme example of complexity and cultural evolution. It is a long, hierarchically structured vocal display that undergoes constant evolutionary change. Obtaining robust metrics to quantify song variation at multiple scales (from a sound through to population variation across the seascape) is a substantial challenge. Here, we present a method to quantify song similarity at multiple levels within the hierarchy. To incorporate the complexity of these multiple levels, the calculation of similarity is weighted by measurements of sound units (lower levels within the display) to bridge the gap in information between upper and lower levels. Results demonstrate that the inclusion of weighting provides a more realistic and robust representation of song similarity at multiple levels within the display. Our method permits robust quantification of cultural patterns and processes that will also contribute to the conservation management of endangered humpback whale populations, and is applicable to any hierarchically structured signal sequence.",
keywords = "Song, Sequence, Cultural evolution, Levenshtein distance, Humpback whale",
author = "Garland, {Ellen C.} and Luke Rendell and Lilley, {Matthew S.} and Poole, {M. Michael} and Jenny Allen and Noad, {Michael J.}",
note = "E.C.G. was funded by a Royal Society Newton International Fellowship. L.R. was supported by the MASTS pooling initiative (The Marine Alliance for Science and Technology for Scotland) and their support is gratefully acknowledged. MASTS is funded by the Scottish Funding Council (Grant Reference No. HR09011) and contributing institutions. Some funding and logistical support was provided to M.M.P. by the National Oceanic Society (USA), Dolphin & Whale Watching Expeditions (French Polynesia), Vista Press (USA), and the International Fund for Animal Welfare (via the South Pacific Whale Research Consortium).",
year = "2017",
month = "7",
day = "31",
doi = "10.1121/1.4991320",
language = "English",
volume = "142",
pages = "460--472",
journal = "Journal of the Acoustical Society of America",
issn = "0001-4966",
publisher = "Acoustical Society of America",
number = "1",

}

RIS (suitable for import to EndNote) - Download

TY - JOUR

T1 - The devil is in the detail

T2 - Journal of the Acoustical Society of America

AU - Garland, Ellen C.

AU - Rendell, Luke

AU - Lilley, Matthew S.

AU - Poole, M. Michael

AU - Allen, Jenny

AU - Noad, Michael J.

N1 - E.C.G. was funded by a Royal Society Newton International Fellowship. L.R. was supported by the MASTS pooling initiative (The Marine Alliance for Science and Technology for Scotland) and their support is gratefully acknowledged. MASTS is funded by the Scottish Funding Council (Grant Reference No. HR09011) and contributing institutions. Some funding and logistical support was provided to M.M.P. by the National Oceanic Society (USA), Dolphin & Whale Watching Expeditions (French Polynesia), Vista Press (USA), and the International Fund for Animal Welfare (via the South Pacific Whale Research Consortium).

PY - 2017/7/31

Y1 - 2017/7/31

N2 - Identifying and quantifying variation in vocalizations is fundamental to advancing our understanding of processes such as speciation, sexual selection, and cultural evolution. The song of the humpback whale (Megaptera novaeangliae) presents an extreme example of complexity and cultural evolution. It is a long, hierarchically structured vocal display that undergoes constant evolutionary change. Obtaining robust metrics to quantify song variation at multiple scales (from a sound through to population variation across the seascape) is a substantial challenge. Here, we present a method to quantify song similarity at multiple levels within the hierarchy. To incorporate the complexity of these multiple levels, the calculation of similarity is weighted by measurements of sound units (lower levels within the display) to bridge the gap in information between upper and lower levels. Results demonstrate that the inclusion of weighting provides a more realistic and robust representation of song similarity at multiple levels within the display. Our method permits robust quantification of cultural patterns and processes that will also contribute to the conservation management of endangered humpback whale populations, and is applicable to any hierarchically structured signal sequence.

AB - Identifying and quantifying variation in vocalizations is fundamental to advancing our understanding of processes such as speciation, sexual selection, and cultural evolution. The song of the humpback whale (Megaptera novaeangliae) presents an extreme example of complexity and cultural evolution. It is a long, hierarchically structured vocal display that undergoes constant evolutionary change. Obtaining robust metrics to quantify song variation at multiple scales (from a sound through to population variation across the seascape) is a substantial challenge. Here, we present a method to quantify song similarity at multiple levels within the hierarchy. To incorporate the complexity of these multiple levels, the calculation of similarity is weighted by measurements of sound units (lower levels within the display) to bridge the gap in information between upper and lower levels. Results demonstrate that the inclusion of weighting provides a more realistic and robust representation of song similarity at multiple levels within the display. Our method permits robust quantification of cultural patterns and processes that will also contribute to the conservation management of endangered humpback whale populations, and is applicable to any hierarchically structured signal sequence.

KW - Song

KW - Sequence

KW - Cultural evolution

KW - Levenshtein distance

KW - Humpback whale

UR - http://asa.scitation.org/doi/suppl/10.1121/1.4991320

U2 - 10.1121/1.4991320

DO - 10.1121/1.4991320

M3 - Article

VL - 142

SP - 460

EP - 472

JO - Journal of the Acoustical Society of America

JF - Journal of the Acoustical Society of America

SN - 0001-4966

IS - 1

ER -

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ID: 249439923