Skip to content

Research at St Andrews

The double proximity paradox in peacebuilding: implementation and perception of the EU rule of law mission in Kosovo

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

This contribution increases the understanding of the EU's role in post-conflict settings by exploring perceptions of EULEX by local rule of law experts. Drawing on critical peacebuilding and the decline of normative power Europe literatures, we develop an analytical framework, underlining the importance of the intention–implementation gap and the implementation–perception gap in understanding how EU missions are perceived. By comparing local expert narratives to those of EULEX judges, prosecutors, and legal officers, we contend that the core problem for the negative perception of the mission results from what we call the double proximity paradox in peacebuilding. The first paradox is one of implementation and transpires when an actor commits substantial resources to address structural problems in a post-conflict territory due to its centrality for its own interests, but fails to uphold its commitment as its immediate interests can only be achieved through agents who contribute to these problems. The second paradox relates to perception and transpires as high commitments raise expectations of structural impact. The visibility of the actor's investment makes any implementation failures more tangible. The actor is therefore, paradoxically, the most open to criticism in a territory where it is doing the most.
Close

Details

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)493-512
Number of pages20
JournalEuropean Security
Volume28
Issue number4
Early online date5 Aug 2019
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2019

    Research areas

  • EU, Kosovo, Rule of law, Local perceptions, Peacebuilding

Discover related content
Find related publications, people, projects and more using interactive charts.

View graph of relations

Related by author

  1. Peacekeeping: Resilience of an idea

    Peter, M., 1 Jan 2019, United Nations peace operations in a changing global order. de Coning, C. & Peter, M. (eds.). Palgrave Macmillan, p. 25-43

    Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

  2. UN peace operations: Adapting to a new global order?

    Peter, M., 1 Jan 2019, United Nations peace operations in a changing global order. de Coning, C. & Peter, M. (eds.). Palgrave Macmillan, p. 1-21

    Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

  3. United Nations Peace Operations in a Changing Global Order

    Peter, M. (ed.) & de Coning, C. (ed.), 1 Jan 2019, Palgrave Macmillan.

    Research output: Book/ReportAnthology

  4. Securitisation of research: fieldwork under new restrictions in Darfur and Mali

    Peter, M. & Strazzari, F., 3 Jul 2017, In : Third World Quarterly. 38, 7, p. 1531-1550 20 p.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

  5. Supporting the formation of new states and administrations: South Sudan, Kosovo and Timor-Leste

    Peter, M. & Felix da Costa, D., 20 Feb 2017, UN Peacekeeping Doctrine in a New Era: Adapting to Stabilisation, Protection and New Threats. de Coning, C., Aoi, C. & Karlsrud, J. (eds.). Routledge, p. 189-210 (Global Institutions).

    Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Related by journal

  1. The Difficulties of Knowing the Start of War in the Information Age: Russia, Georgia and the War over South Ossetia, August 2008

    Fawn, R. & Nalbandov, R., 12 Mar 2012, In : European Security. 21, 1, p. 57-89

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

  2. Before and After Lisbon: Legal implementation as the ‘Achilles Heel’ in EU Counter-terrorism?

    Argomaniz, J., 2010, In : European Security. 19, 2, p. 297-316 19 p.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Related by journal

  1. European Security (Journal)

    William Vlcek (Reviewer)
    2010

    Activity: Publication peer-review and editorial work typesPeer review of manuscripts

ID: 260334236

Top