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The EC hotspot approach in Greece: creating liminal EU territory

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The EC hotspot approach in Greece : creating liminal EU territory. / Papoutsi, Anna; Painter, Joe; Papada, Evie; Vradis, Antonis.

In: Journal of Ethnic and Migration Studies, Vol. 45, No. 12, 10.09.2019, p. 2200-2212.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Harvard

Papoutsi, A, Painter, J, Papada, E & Vradis, A 2019, 'The EC hotspot approach in Greece: creating liminal EU territory', Journal of Ethnic and Migration Studies, vol. 45, no. 12, pp. 2200-2212. https://doi.org/10.1080/1369183X.2018.1468351

APA

Papoutsi, A., Painter, J., Papada, E., & Vradis, A. (2019). The EC hotspot approach in Greece: creating liminal EU territory. Journal of Ethnic and Migration Studies, 45(12), 2200-2212. https://doi.org/10.1080/1369183X.2018.1468351

Vancouver

Papoutsi A, Painter J, Papada E, Vradis A. The EC hotspot approach in Greece: creating liminal EU territory. Journal of Ethnic and Migration Studies. 2019 Sep 10;45(12):2200-2212. https://doi.org/10.1080/1369183X.2018.1468351

Author

Papoutsi, Anna ; Painter, Joe ; Papada, Evie ; Vradis, Antonis. / The EC hotspot approach in Greece : creating liminal EU territory. In: Journal of Ethnic and Migration Studies. 2019 ; Vol. 45, No. 12. pp. 2200-2212.

Bibtex - Download

@article{4630678453094e1381c2b2eb0f224d8e,
title = "The EC hotspot approach in Greece: creating liminal EU territory",
abstract = "This article makes a theoretical argument stemming from our study of the European Commission's hotspot approach to the management of migrant populations. It draws on empirical research findings from field research which took place on the island of Lesbos and in the city of Athens over the course of 20 months and links these to emerging critical studies of the new EU border regime. No clear definition exists of what comprises a hotspot: instead, the European Commission describes this as an integrated 'approach' for the enhancement of the capacity of member states to deal with crises resulting from pressures at the Union's external borders. Effective in its ambiguity, the 'hotspot approach' therefore constitutes, as we argue, an integral part of the Europeanisation and institutionalisation of border management: a powerfully ambiguous dispositif in the EU's emerging border regime. The article unpacks the notion of the hotspot from a historical perspective and explores the ways in which the hotspot contributes toward the culmination of European integration, paving the way for the flexible governance of mobility and asylum. We situate the hotspot within the historical shift of migration and mobility control from the border to the territory as a whole and conclude by arguing that the hotspot plays the role of a territorial incubator for the liminal EU territory: a paradigmatic space for a new form of governance that further disentangles territory from rights.",
keywords = "Hotspot, asylum, migration, liminality, EU territory, Mediterranean, MIGRATION, BORDERS, US",
author = "Anna Papoutsi and Joe Painter and Evie Papada and Antonis Vradis",
year = "2019",
month = sep,
day = "10",
doi = "10.1080/1369183X.2018.1468351",
language = "English",
volume = "45",
pages = "2200--2212",
journal = "Journal of Ethnic and Migration Studies",
issn = "1369-183X",
publisher = "Routledge",
number = "12",

}

RIS (suitable for import to EndNote) - Download

TY - JOUR

T1 - The EC hotspot approach in Greece

T2 - creating liminal EU territory

AU - Papoutsi, Anna

AU - Painter, Joe

AU - Papada, Evie

AU - Vradis, Antonis

PY - 2019/9/10

Y1 - 2019/9/10

N2 - This article makes a theoretical argument stemming from our study of the European Commission's hotspot approach to the management of migrant populations. It draws on empirical research findings from field research which took place on the island of Lesbos and in the city of Athens over the course of 20 months and links these to emerging critical studies of the new EU border regime. No clear definition exists of what comprises a hotspot: instead, the European Commission describes this as an integrated 'approach' for the enhancement of the capacity of member states to deal with crises resulting from pressures at the Union's external borders. Effective in its ambiguity, the 'hotspot approach' therefore constitutes, as we argue, an integral part of the Europeanisation and institutionalisation of border management: a powerfully ambiguous dispositif in the EU's emerging border regime. The article unpacks the notion of the hotspot from a historical perspective and explores the ways in which the hotspot contributes toward the culmination of European integration, paving the way for the flexible governance of mobility and asylum. We situate the hotspot within the historical shift of migration and mobility control from the border to the territory as a whole and conclude by arguing that the hotspot plays the role of a territorial incubator for the liminal EU territory: a paradigmatic space for a new form of governance that further disentangles territory from rights.

AB - This article makes a theoretical argument stemming from our study of the European Commission's hotspot approach to the management of migrant populations. It draws on empirical research findings from field research which took place on the island of Lesbos and in the city of Athens over the course of 20 months and links these to emerging critical studies of the new EU border regime. No clear definition exists of what comprises a hotspot: instead, the European Commission describes this as an integrated 'approach' for the enhancement of the capacity of member states to deal with crises resulting from pressures at the Union's external borders. Effective in its ambiguity, the 'hotspot approach' therefore constitutes, as we argue, an integral part of the Europeanisation and institutionalisation of border management: a powerfully ambiguous dispositif in the EU's emerging border regime. The article unpacks the notion of the hotspot from a historical perspective and explores the ways in which the hotspot contributes toward the culmination of European integration, paving the way for the flexible governance of mobility and asylum. We situate the hotspot within the historical shift of migration and mobility control from the border to the territory as a whole and conclude by arguing that the hotspot plays the role of a territorial incubator for the liminal EU territory: a paradigmatic space for a new form of governance that further disentangles territory from rights.

KW - Hotspot

KW - asylum

KW - migration

KW - liminality

KW - EU territory

KW - Mediterranean

KW - MIGRATION

KW - BORDERS

KW - US

U2 - 10.1080/1369183X.2018.1468351

DO - 10.1080/1369183X.2018.1468351

M3 - Article

VL - 45

SP - 2200

EP - 2212

JO - Journal of Ethnic and Migration Studies

JF - Journal of Ethnic and Migration Studies

SN - 1369-183X

IS - 12

ER -

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