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The importance of acknowledgement of emotions in routine patient psychological assessment: the example of the dental setting

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

DOI

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The importance of acknowledgement of emotions in routine patient psychological assessment : the example of the dental setting. / Hally, J.; Freeman, R.; Yuan, S.; Humphris, G.

In: Patient Education and Counseling, Vol. 100, No. 11, 11.2017, p. 2102-2105.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Harvard

Hally, J, Freeman, R, Yuan, S & Humphris, G 2017, 'The importance of acknowledgement of emotions in routine patient psychological assessment: the example of the dental setting' Patient Education and Counseling, vol 100, no. 11, pp. 2102-2105. DOI: 10.1016/j.pec.2017.05.005

APA

Hally, J., Freeman, R., Yuan, S., & Humphris, G. (2017). The importance of acknowledgement of emotions in routine patient psychological assessment: the example of the dental setting. Patient Education and Counseling, 100(11), 2102-2105. DOI: 10.1016/j.pec.2017.05.005

Vancouver

Hally J, Freeman R, Yuan S, Humphris G. The importance of acknowledgement of emotions in routine patient psychological assessment: the example of the dental setting. Patient Education and Counseling. 2017 Nov;100(11):2102-2105. Available from, DOI: 10.1016/j.pec.2017.05.005

Author

Hally, J.; Freeman, R.; Yuan, S.; Humphris, G. / The importance of acknowledgement of emotions in routine patient psychological assessment : the example of the dental setting.

In: Patient Education and Counseling, Vol. 100, No. 11, 11.2017, p. 2102-2105.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Bibtex - Download

@article{0b6b3ff0fd84492ba26f1996b1d6d676,
title = "The importance of acknowledgement of emotions in routine patient psychological assessment: the example of the dental setting",
abstract = "Objective:  To investigate, by means of a conceptual model, the effect of dental staff engaging with their patients who share their level of dental anxiety in a short screening questionnaire.Methods:  Three consecutive studies based in the UK primary dental care services were conducted. Each study adopted a randomised group design to focus on the possible influence on patient state anxiety of the dentist becoming aware of their patients' dental anxiety from the self-reports of the Modified Dental Anxiety Scale (MDAS).Results:  A consistent finding in the first two studies was that the presentation of MDAS score sheet to the dentist was effective in reducing patient state anxiety when leaving the surgery. The third study provided supportive evidence that a more permanent anxiolytic effect of the presentation of the MDAS to the dentist was associated with the dentist responding openly to their patient about the fears expressed.Conclusion:  The active engagement of dental staff in the formal presentation of dental anxiety screening confers a reliable benefit to dentally anxious patients. Clinical implications:   Anxiety assessments in clinical service may give patients significant relief when staff acknowledge and engage patients when presented with their self-reported ratings.",
keywords = "Dental anxiety, Interaction, Self-report measure, Dentist, Patient, Communication",
author = "J. Hally and R. Freeman and S. Yuan and G. Humphris",
note = "This work was funded by the Chief Scientist Office, Scotland under their Clinical Academic Fellowship Scheme (grant number: CAF/07/02).",
year = "2017",
month = "11",
doi = "10.1016/j.pec.2017.05.005",
volume = "100",
pages = "2102--2105",
journal = "Patient Education and Counseling",
issn = "0738-3991",
publisher = "Elsevier Ireland Ltd",
number = "11",

}

RIS (suitable for import to EndNote) - Download

TY - JOUR

T1 - The importance of acknowledgement of emotions in routine patient psychological assessment

T2 - Patient Education and Counseling

AU - Hally,J.

AU - Freeman,R.

AU - Yuan,S.

AU - Humphris,G.

N1 - This work was funded by the Chief Scientist Office, Scotland under their Clinical Academic Fellowship Scheme (grant number: CAF/07/02).

PY - 2017/11

Y1 - 2017/11

N2 - Objective:  To investigate, by means of a conceptual model, the effect of dental staff engaging with their patients who share their level of dental anxiety in a short screening questionnaire.Methods:  Three consecutive studies based in the UK primary dental care services were conducted. Each study adopted a randomised group design to focus on the possible influence on patient state anxiety of the dentist becoming aware of their patients' dental anxiety from the self-reports of the Modified Dental Anxiety Scale (MDAS).Results:  A consistent finding in the first two studies was that the presentation of MDAS score sheet to the dentist was effective in reducing patient state anxiety when leaving the surgery. The third study provided supportive evidence that a more permanent anxiolytic effect of the presentation of the MDAS to the dentist was associated with the dentist responding openly to their patient about the fears expressed.Conclusion:  The active engagement of dental staff in the formal presentation of dental anxiety screening confers a reliable benefit to dentally anxious patients. Clinical implications:   Anxiety assessments in clinical service may give patients significant relief when staff acknowledge and engage patients when presented with their self-reported ratings.

AB - Objective:  To investigate, by means of a conceptual model, the effect of dental staff engaging with their patients who share their level of dental anxiety in a short screening questionnaire.Methods:  Three consecutive studies based in the UK primary dental care services were conducted. Each study adopted a randomised group design to focus on the possible influence on patient state anxiety of the dentist becoming aware of their patients' dental anxiety from the self-reports of the Modified Dental Anxiety Scale (MDAS).Results:  A consistent finding in the first two studies was that the presentation of MDAS score sheet to the dentist was effective in reducing patient state anxiety when leaving the surgery. The third study provided supportive evidence that a more permanent anxiolytic effect of the presentation of the MDAS to the dentist was associated with the dentist responding openly to their patient about the fears expressed.Conclusion:  The active engagement of dental staff in the formal presentation of dental anxiety screening confers a reliable benefit to dentally anxious patients. Clinical implications:   Anxiety assessments in clinical service may give patients significant relief when staff acknowledge and engage patients when presented with their self-reported ratings.

KW - Dental anxiety

KW - Interaction

KW - Self-report measure

KW - Dentist

KW - Patient

KW - Communication

U2 - 10.1016/j.pec.2017.05.005

DO - 10.1016/j.pec.2017.05.005

M3 - Article

VL - 100

SP - 2102

EP - 2105

JO - Patient Education and Counseling

JF - Patient Education and Counseling

SN - 0738-3991

IS - 11

ER -

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