Skip to content

Research at St Andrews

The influence of Corophium volutator and Hydrobia ulvae on intertidal benthic diatoms assemblages under different nutrient and temperature regimes

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

DOI

Abstract

Epipelic diatoms dominate the microphytobenthos of estuarine sediments, where they play important roles in ecological processes such as primary production, secondary production and sediment stability. Grazing (top-down control) and nutrients (bottom-up control) regulate the biomass and species composition of intertidal benthic diatom assemblages. However, observations of grazing/predation effects on species richness differ under contrasting nutrient conditions. We investigated the interactive effects of grazing, nutrients and temperature and compared the impacts of Corophium volutator and Hydrobia ulvae-2 species that differ in their feeding strategies and bioturbation effects. Diatom assemblages were collected from 2 estuaries (Biezelingsche Ham, Westerschelde, high nutrient, and Zandkreek, Oosterschelde, low nutrient) in The Netherlands that differ in their dominant macrofaunal grazer species. Assemblages were grown in the laboratory without (control) and with grazing activity under different nutrient and temperature regimes. C. volutatorexerted a strong regulatory influence on epipelic diatoms by reducing biomass, and preferentially consuming certain dominant taxa, thereby increasing species richness, evenness and diversity. The percentage of epipsammic species increased in the presence of C. volutator, at the expense of Navicula species. Biezelingsche Ham assemblages grazed by C. volutator were not influenced by nutrient or temperature regime, while control assemblages were influenced by temperature. In contrast, differences in the structure of diatom assemblages between the treatments were far less pronounced for H. ulvaegrazed and control Zandkreek assemblages. H. ulvae appeared to be a general consumer, grazing subdominant species. Species richness was greater at low temperature, regardless of nutrient level. Macrofaunal grazing did not predictably increase or decrease species diversity, but could potentially do both, and it may mask the effects of environmental and bottom-up control.

Close

Details

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)47-59
Number of pages13
JournalMarine Ecology Progress Series
Issue number245
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2002

    Research areas

  • benthic diatoms, grazing, nutrients, temperature, Corophium volutator, Hydrobia ulvae, estuaries, intertidal mudflats, MUD SNAILS HYDROBIIDAE, WATER MARINE HABITATS, FEEDING-BEHAVIOR, MICROPHYTOBENTHIC COMMUNITY, SOUTHEASTERN ENGLAND, SEDIMENT STABILITY, EPIPELIC DIATOMS, ECOLOGICAL ROLE, SECRET GARDEN, SALT-MARSH

Discover related content
Find related publications, people, projects and more using interactive charts.

View graph of relations

Related by author

  1. Assessing risk of E. coli resuspension from intertidal estuarine sediments: implications for water quality

    Wyness, A. J., Paterson, D. M., Rimmer, J., Defew, E. C., Stuttter, M. I. & Avery, L. M., 5 Sep 2019, In: International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health. 16, 18, 13 p., 3255.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

  2. Factors affecting the spatial and temporal distribution of E. coli in intertidal estuarine sediments

    Wyness, A. J., Paterson, D. M., Mendo, T., Defew, E. C., Stutter, M. I. & Avery, L. M., 15 Apr 2019, In: Science of the Total Environment. 661, p. 155-167

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

  3. The role of zeta potential in the adhesion of E. coli to suspended intertidal sediments

    Wyness, A., Paterson, D. M., Defew, E., Stutter, M. & Avery, L., 1 Oct 2018, In: Water Research. 142, p. 159-166

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

  4. Impacts of physical disturbance on the recovery of a macrofaunal community: A comparative analysis using traditional and novel approaches

    Wan Hussin, W. M. R., Cooper, K. M., Frojan, C. R. S. B., Defew, E. C. & Paterson, D. M., Jan 2012, In: Ecological Indicators. 12, 1, p. 37-45 9 p.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Related by journal

  1. Marine Ecology Progress Series (Journal)

    Joanna Louise Kershaw (Reviewer)

    6 Mar 2020

    Activity: Publication peer-review and editorial work typesPeer review of manuscripts

  2. Marine Ecology Progress Series (Journal)

    Joanna Louise Kershaw (Reviewer)

    12 Jul 2019

    Activity: Publication peer-review and editorial work typesPeer review of manuscripts

  3. Marine Ecology Progress Series (Journal)

    Matt Carter (Reviewer)

    2019

    Activity: Publication peer-review and editorial work typesPeer review of manuscripts

  4. Marine Ecology Progress Series (Journal)

    Matt Carter (Reviewer)

    2018

    Activity: Publication peer-review and editorial work typesPeer review of manuscripts

  5. Marine Ecology Progress Series (Journal)

    Sophie Caroline Smout (Reviewer)

    1 Mar 201630 Mar 2016

    Activity: Publication peer-review and editorial work typesPeer review of manuscripts

Related by journal

  1. Indication that the behavioural responses of humpback whales to killer whale sounds are influenced by trophic relationships

    Benti, B., Miller, P. J. O., Biuw, M. & Curé, C., 18 Feb 2021, In: Marine Ecology Progress Series. 660, p. 217-232

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

  2. Seascape ecology: identifying research priorities for an emerging ocean sustainability science

    Pittman, SJ., Yates, KL., Bouchet, PJ., Alvarez-Berastegui, D., Andréfouët, S., Bell, SS., Berkström, C., Boström, C., Brown, CJ., Connolly, RM., Devillers, R., Eggleston, D., Gilby, BL., Gullström, M., Halpern, BS., Hidalgo, M., Holstein, D., Hovel, K., Huettmann, F., Jackson, EL. & 18 others, James, WR., Kellner, JB., Kot, CY., Lecours, V., Lepczyk, C., Nagelkerken, I., Nelson, J., Olds, AD., Santos, RO., Scales, KL., Schneider, DC., Schilling, HT., Simenstad, C., Suthers, IM., Treml, EA., Wedding, LM., Yates, P. & Young, M., 31 Mar 2021, In: Marine Ecology Progress Series. 663, p. 1-29 29 p.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

  3. Assessing the spatiotemporal persistence of fish distributions: a case study on two red mullet species (Mullus surmuletus and M. barbatus) in the western Mediterranean

    Paradinas Aranjuelo, J. M., Conesa, D., López-Quílez, A., Esteban, A., Martín López, L. M., María Bellido, J. & Grazia Pennino, M., 25 Jun 2020, In: Marine Ecology Progress Series. 644, p. 173-185

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

  4. Drivers of diversity gradients of a highly mobile marine assemblage in a mesoscale seascape

    Svendsen, G. M., Ocampo Reinaldo, M., Alejandra Romero, M., Williams, G., Magurran, A., Luque, S. & Gonzalez, R. A., 19 Mar 2020, In: Marine Ecology Progress Series. 638, p. 149-164 16 p.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

  5. Killer whales are attracted to herring fishing vessels

    Mul, E., Blanchet, M. A., McClintock, B. T., Grecian, W. J., Biuw, M. & Rikardsen, A., 15 Oct 2020, In: Marine Ecology Progress Series. 652, p. 1-13 13 p.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

ID: 156231

Top