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The learning and use of gestural signals by young chimpanzees: A trans-generational study

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DOI

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The learning and use of gestural signals by young chimpanzees : A trans-generational study. / TOMASELLO, M; Call, Josep; NAGELL, K; OLGUIN, R; CARPENTER, M.

In: Primates, Vol. 35, No. 2, 04.1994, p. 137-154.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Harvard

TOMASELLO, M, Call, J, NAGELL, K, OLGUIN, R & CARPENTER, M 1994, 'The learning and use of gestural signals by young chimpanzees: A trans-generational study', Primates, vol. 35, no. 2, pp. 137-154. https://doi.org/10.1007/BF02382050

APA

TOMASELLO, M., Call, J., NAGELL, K., OLGUIN, R., & CARPENTER, M. (1994). The learning and use of gestural signals by young chimpanzees: A trans-generational study. Primates, 35(2), 137-154. https://doi.org/10.1007/BF02382050

Vancouver

TOMASELLO M, Call J, NAGELL K, OLGUIN R, CARPENTER M. The learning and use of gestural signals by young chimpanzees: A trans-generational study. Primates. 1994 Apr;35(2):137-154. https://doi.org/10.1007/BF02382050

Author

TOMASELLO, M ; Call, Josep ; NAGELL, K ; OLGUIN, R ; CARPENTER, M. / The learning and use of gestural signals by young chimpanzees : A trans-generational study. In: Primates. 1994 ; Vol. 35, No. 2. pp. 137-154.

Bibtex - Download

@article{b59a7f7c9a8e485e9e4ca29360b99a8d,
title = "The learning and use of gestural signals by young chimpanzees: A trans-generational study",
abstract = "Observations of chimpanzee gestural communication are reported. The observations represent the third longitudinal time point of an ongoing study of the Yerkes Primate Center Field Station chimpanzee group. In contrast to observations at the first two time points, the current observations are of a new generation of infants and juveniles. There were two questions. The first concerned how young chimpanzees used their gestures, with special focus on the flexibility or intentionality displayed. It was found that youngsters quite often used the same gesture in different contexts, and different gestures in the same context. In addition, they sometimes used gestures in combinations in a single social encounter, these combinations did not convey intentions that could not be conveyed by the component gestures however. It was also found that individuals adjusted their choice of signals depending on the attentional state of the recipient. The second question was how chimpanzees acquired their gestural signals. In general, it was found that there was little consistency in the use of gestures among individuals, especially for non-play gestures, with much individual variability both within and across generations. There were also a number of idiosyncratic gestures used by single individuals at each time point. It was concluded from these results that youngsters were not imitatively learning their communicatory gestures from conspecifics, but rather that they were individually conventionalizing them with each other. Implications of these findings for the understanding of chimpanzee communication and social learning are discussed.",
keywords = "CHIMPANZEES, GESTURES, COMMUNICATION, CULTURE, WILD CHIMPANZEES",
author = "M TOMASELLO and Josep Call and K NAGELL and R OLGUIN and M CARPENTER",
year = "1994",
month = apr,
doi = "10.1007/BF02382050",
language = "English",
volume = "35",
pages = "137--154",
journal = "Primates",
issn = "0032-8332",
publisher = "Springer",
number = "2",

}

RIS (suitable for import to EndNote) - Download

TY - JOUR

T1 - The learning and use of gestural signals by young chimpanzees

T2 - A trans-generational study

AU - TOMASELLO, M

AU - Call, Josep

AU - NAGELL, K

AU - OLGUIN, R

AU - CARPENTER, M

PY - 1994/4

Y1 - 1994/4

N2 - Observations of chimpanzee gestural communication are reported. The observations represent the third longitudinal time point of an ongoing study of the Yerkes Primate Center Field Station chimpanzee group. In contrast to observations at the first two time points, the current observations are of a new generation of infants and juveniles. There were two questions. The first concerned how young chimpanzees used their gestures, with special focus on the flexibility or intentionality displayed. It was found that youngsters quite often used the same gesture in different contexts, and different gestures in the same context. In addition, they sometimes used gestures in combinations in a single social encounter, these combinations did not convey intentions that could not be conveyed by the component gestures however. It was also found that individuals adjusted their choice of signals depending on the attentional state of the recipient. The second question was how chimpanzees acquired their gestural signals. In general, it was found that there was little consistency in the use of gestures among individuals, especially for non-play gestures, with much individual variability both within and across generations. There were also a number of idiosyncratic gestures used by single individuals at each time point. It was concluded from these results that youngsters were not imitatively learning their communicatory gestures from conspecifics, but rather that they were individually conventionalizing them with each other. Implications of these findings for the understanding of chimpanzee communication and social learning are discussed.

AB - Observations of chimpanzee gestural communication are reported. The observations represent the third longitudinal time point of an ongoing study of the Yerkes Primate Center Field Station chimpanzee group. In contrast to observations at the first two time points, the current observations are of a new generation of infants and juveniles. There were two questions. The first concerned how young chimpanzees used their gestures, with special focus on the flexibility or intentionality displayed. It was found that youngsters quite often used the same gesture in different contexts, and different gestures in the same context. In addition, they sometimes used gestures in combinations in a single social encounter, these combinations did not convey intentions that could not be conveyed by the component gestures however. It was also found that individuals adjusted their choice of signals depending on the attentional state of the recipient. The second question was how chimpanzees acquired their gestural signals. In general, it was found that there was little consistency in the use of gestures among individuals, especially for non-play gestures, with much individual variability both within and across generations. There were also a number of idiosyncratic gestures used by single individuals at each time point. It was concluded from these results that youngsters were not imitatively learning their communicatory gestures from conspecifics, but rather that they were individually conventionalizing them with each other. Implications of these findings for the understanding of chimpanzee communication and social learning are discussed.

KW - CHIMPANZEES

KW - GESTURES

KW - COMMUNICATION

KW - CULTURE

KW - WILD CHIMPANZEES

U2 - 10.1007/BF02382050

DO - 10.1007/BF02382050

M3 - Article

VL - 35

SP - 137

EP - 154

JO - Primates

JF - Primates

SN - 0032-8332

IS - 2

ER -

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ID: 78738723

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