Skip to content

Research at St Andrews

The neural mechanism underlying recollection is sensitive to the quality of episodic memory: event related potentials reveal a some-or-none threshold

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Author(s)

Jamie G. Murray, Catherine A. Howie, David I. Donaldson

School/Research organisations

Abstract

Although much is known about the underlying neural systems that support recollection, exactly how recollection operates remains unclear. One possibility is that recollection reflects the operation of a continuous retrieval process, whereby test cues always elicit some information from memory. Alternatively, recollection may reflect the operation of a thresholded process that allows for retrieval failure, whereby test cues sometimes elicit no information from memory at all. Here we demonstrate that recollection is thresholded by measuring a commonly reported electrophysiological correlate of episodic retrieval - known as the Left Parietal old/new effect. We use a novel source task designed to directly measure the accuracy of retrieval success, finding that the neural correlate of retrieval was sensitive to the precision of responses when recollection succeeded, but was absent when recollection failed. The results clarify the nature of the neural mechanism underlying episodic memory, providing novel evidence in support of some-or-none threshold models of recollection.

Close

Details

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)298-308
Number of pages11
JournalNeuroImage
Volume120
Early online date2 Jul 2015
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 15 Oct 2015

    Research areas

  • Episodic memory, Event Related Potentials (ERPs), Left parietal effect, Recollection, Source memory, Threshold

Discover related content
Find related publications, people, projects and more using interactive charts.

View graph of relations

Related by author

  1. Teachers matter for metacognition: facilitating metacognition in the primary school through teacher-pupil interactions

    Branigan, H. E. & Donaldson, D. I., Dec 2020, In: Thinking Skills and Creativity. 38, 100718.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

  2. Dissociable effects of prediction and integration during language comprehension: evidence from a largescale study using brain potentials

    Nieuwland, M. S., Barr, D. J., Bartolozzi, F., Busch-Moreno, S., Darley, E., Donaldson, D. I., Ferguson, H. J., Fu, X., Heyselaar, E., Huettig, F., Husband, E. M., Ito, A., Kazanina, N., Kogan, V., Kohút, Z., Kulakova, E., Mézière, D., Politzer-Ahles, S., Rousselet, G., Rueschemeyer, S. A. & 3 others, Segaert, K., Tuomainen, J. & Von Grebmer Zu Wolfsthurn, S., 3 Feb 2020, In: Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences. 375, 1791, 20180522.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

  3. Mobile EEG identifies the re-allocation of attention during real-world activity

    Ladouce, S., Donaldson, D. I., Dudchenko, P. A. & Ietswaart, M., 1 Nov 2019, In: Scientific Reports. 9, 10 p., 15851.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

  4. Understanding the consequences of repetitive subconcussive head impacts in sport: brain changes and dampened motor control are seen after boxing practice

    Di Virgilio, T. G., Ietswaart, M., Wilson, L., Donaldson, D. I. & Hunter, A. M., 10 Sep 2019, In: Frontiers in Human Neuroscience. 13, 294.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

  5. Learning from learning logs: a case study of metacognition in the primary school classroom

    Branigan, H. E. & Donaldson, D. I., 1 Aug 2019, In: British Educational Research Journal. 45, 4, p. 791-820

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Related by journal

  1. Neural responses to apparent motion can be predicted by responses to non-moving stimuli

    Poncet, M. & Ales, J. M., Sep 2020, In: NeuroImage. 218, 13 p., 116973.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

  2. Detecting the neural correlates of episodic memory with mobile EEG: recollecting objects in the real world

    Park, J. L. & Donaldson, D. I., Jun 2019, In: NeuroImage. 193, p. 1-9 9 p.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

  3. The role of the frontal aslant tract and premotor connections in visually giuded hand movements

    Budisavljevic, S., Dell'Acqua, F., Djordjilovic, V., Miotto, D., Motta, R. & Castiello, U., 2017, In: NeuroImage. 146, p. 419-428

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

  4. Investigating the relationship between implicit and explicit memory: evidence that masked repetition priming speeds the onset of recollection

    Park, J. L. & Donaldson, D. I., 1 Oct 2016, In: NeuroImage. 139, p. 8-16 9 p.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

ID: 262819641

Top