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The potential for Assemblage thinking in population geography: assembling population, space and place

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The potential for Assemblage thinking in population geography : assembling population, space and place. / Duffy, Paula; Stojanovic, Tim.

In: Population, Space and Place, Vol. 24, No. 3, e2097, 10.04.2018.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Harvard

Duffy, P & Stojanovic, T 2018, 'The potential for Assemblage thinking in population geography: assembling population, space and place', Population, Space and Place, vol. 24, no. 3, e2097. https://doi.org/10.1002/psp.2097

APA

Duffy, P., & Stojanovic, T. (2018). The potential for Assemblage thinking in population geography: assembling population, space and place. Population, Space and Place, 24(3), [e2097]. https://doi.org/10.1002/psp.2097

Vancouver

Duffy P, Stojanovic T. The potential for Assemblage thinking in population geography: assembling population, space and place. Population, Space and Place. 2018 Apr 10;24(3). e2097. https://doi.org/10.1002/psp.2097

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Duffy, Paula ; Stojanovic, Tim. / The potential for Assemblage thinking in population geography : assembling population, space and place. In: Population, Space and Place. 2018 ; Vol. 24, No. 3.

Bibtex - Download

@article{2b0ac6a4a07544de9f09f55b2c2551d3,
title = "The potential for Assemblage thinking in population geography: assembling population, space and place",
abstract = "This study explores {\textquoteleft}Assemblage{\textquoteright} thinking as an approach for population geography research. The paper highlights the recent prominence of Assemblage thinking in human geography, before exploring the potential opportunities for engagement by population geographers. In particular we focus on the production of place as co-constituted by the material (space) and the discursive (knowledge, process and practice). Considering the Assemblage practice of {\textquoteleft}Rendering Technical{\textquoteright}, we reflect on the role that population geography plays in authorising knowledge and supporting policy. This is investigated through a critical taxonomic analysis of recent Scottish demographic data. It is argued on the one hand that this captures key economic and population characteristics of {\textquoteleft}place{\textquoteright}, while on the other hand it offers a limited technical knowledge. We conclude that a reflexive approach to research using Assemblage thinking may challenge the intimate relationship between population geographers and the state.",
keywords = "Assemblage, Emergence, Coastal Communities, Geodemographics, Resilience",
author = "Paula Duffy and Tim Stojanovic",
note = "This paper is output from an Economic and Social Research Council Award (Reference 1506438) funded in partnership with Marine Scotland, The Scottish Government.",
year = "2018",
month = apr,
day = "10",
doi = "10.1002/psp.2097",
language = "English",
volume = "24",
journal = "Population, Space and Place",
issn = "1544-8444",
publisher = "Wiley-Blackwell",
number = "3",

}

RIS (suitable for import to EndNote) - Download

TY - JOUR

T1 - The potential for Assemblage thinking in population geography

T2 - assembling population, space and place

AU - Duffy, Paula

AU - Stojanovic, Tim

N1 - This paper is output from an Economic and Social Research Council Award (Reference 1506438) funded in partnership with Marine Scotland, The Scottish Government.

PY - 2018/4/10

Y1 - 2018/4/10

N2 - This study explores ‘Assemblage’ thinking as an approach for population geography research. The paper highlights the recent prominence of Assemblage thinking in human geography, before exploring the potential opportunities for engagement by population geographers. In particular we focus on the production of place as co-constituted by the material (space) and the discursive (knowledge, process and practice). Considering the Assemblage practice of ‘Rendering Technical’, we reflect on the role that population geography plays in authorising knowledge and supporting policy. This is investigated through a critical taxonomic analysis of recent Scottish demographic data. It is argued on the one hand that this captures key economic and population characteristics of ‘place’, while on the other hand it offers a limited technical knowledge. We conclude that a reflexive approach to research using Assemblage thinking may challenge the intimate relationship between population geographers and the state.

AB - This study explores ‘Assemblage’ thinking as an approach for population geography research. The paper highlights the recent prominence of Assemblage thinking in human geography, before exploring the potential opportunities for engagement by population geographers. In particular we focus on the production of place as co-constituted by the material (space) and the discursive (knowledge, process and practice). Considering the Assemblage practice of ‘Rendering Technical’, we reflect on the role that population geography plays in authorising knowledge and supporting policy. This is investigated through a critical taxonomic analysis of recent Scottish demographic data. It is argued on the one hand that this captures key economic and population characteristics of ‘place’, while on the other hand it offers a limited technical knowledge. We conclude that a reflexive approach to research using Assemblage thinking may challenge the intimate relationship between population geographers and the state.

KW - Assemblage

KW - Emergence

KW - Coastal Communities

KW - Geodemographics

KW - Resilience

U2 - 10.1002/psp.2097

DO - 10.1002/psp.2097

M3 - Article

VL - 24

JO - Population, Space and Place

JF - Population, Space and Place

SN - 1544-8444

IS - 3

M1 - e2097

ER -

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