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The potential of portable luminescence readers in geomorphological investigations: a review

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DOI

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The potential of portable luminescence readers in geomorphological investigations : a review. / Munyikwa, Kennedy; Kinnaird, Tim C.; Sanderson, David C.W.

In: Earth Surface Processes and Landforms, Vol. Early View, 02.09.2020.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Harvard

Munyikwa, K, Kinnaird, TC & Sanderson, DCW 2020, 'The potential of portable luminescence readers in geomorphological investigations: a review', Earth Surface Processes and Landforms, vol. Early View. https://doi.org/10.1002/esp.4975

APA

Munyikwa, K., Kinnaird, T. C., & Sanderson, D. C. W. (2020). The potential of portable luminescence readers in geomorphological investigations: a review. Earth Surface Processes and Landforms, Early View. https://doi.org/10.1002/esp.4975

Vancouver

Munyikwa K, Kinnaird TC, Sanderson DCW. The potential of portable luminescence readers in geomorphological investigations: a review. Earth Surface Processes and Landforms. 2020 Sep 2;Early View. https://doi.org/10.1002/esp.4975

Author

Munyikwa, Kennedy ; Kinnaird, Tim C. ; Sanderson, David C.W. / The potential of portable luminescence readers in geomorphological investigations : a review. In: Earth Surface Processes and Landforms. 2020 ; Vol. Early View.

Bibtex - Download

@article{cc98c35b37e94879a598a0ac07ffd43e,
title = "The potential of portable luminescence readers in geomorphological investigations: a review",
abstract = "The development of functional portable optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) readers over the last decade has provided practitioners with the capability to acquire luminescence signals from geological materials relatively rapidly, which allows for expedient preliminary chronostratigraphic insight when working with complex depositional systems of late Quaternary age. Typically, when using the portable OSL reader, infrared (IR) or blue post-IR OSL signals are acquired from bulk unprocessed materials, in contrast to regular luminescence dating which is usually based on measurements on pure quartz or feldspar mineral separates, or on select silt-sized polymineralic portions. To demonstrate the utility of portable OSL measurements, this paper outlines the basic features of portable OSL readers and their constraints. Afterwards, case studies in which the instrument has been used to elucidate cryptostratigraphic variations in sedimentary sequences for geomorphological applications are reviewed. The studies can generally be grouped into three main categories. The first includes studies where the variation of portable OSL reader luminescence signal intensities with depth are plotted to generate profiles that contextualise sediment stratigraphy. In the second group, portable OSL reader luminescence signal intensities are used to interpret sediment processes that shed light on depositional histories. In the last category, luminescence signals from the portable OSL reader are calibrated to approximate numerical burial ages of depositional units. The paper concludes with a discussion of possible future directions.",
keywords = "Geomorphology, Dating, Landscape evolution, Optically stimulated luminescence, Portable OSL reader, Chronology",
author = "Kennedy Munyikwa and Kinnaird, {Tim C.} and Sanderson, {David C.W.}",
year = "2020",
month = sep,
day = "2",
doi = "10.1002/esp.4975",
language = "English",
volume = "Early View",
journal = "Earth Surface Processes and Landforms",
issn = "0197-9337",
publisher = "John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.",

}

RIS (suitable for import to EndNote) - Download

TY - JOUR

T1 - The potential of portable luminescence readers in geomorphological investigations

T2 - a review

AU - Munyikwa, Kennedy

AU - Kinnaird, Tim C.

AU - Sanderson, David C.W.

PY - 2020/9/2

Y1 - 2020/9/2

N2 - The development of functional portable optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) readers over the last decade has provided practitioners with the capability to acquire luminescence signals from geological materials relatively rapidly, which allows for expedient preliminary chronostratigraphic insight when working with complex depositional systems of late Quaternary age. Typically, when using the portable OSL reader, infrared (IR) or blue post-IR OSL signals are acquired from bulk unprocessed materials, in contrast to regular luminescence dating which is usually based on measurements on pure quartz or feldspar mineral separates, or on select silt-sized polymineralic portions. To demonstrate the utility of portable OSL measurements, this paper outlines the basic features of portable OSL readers and their constraints. Afterwards, case studies in which the instrument has been used to elucidate cryptostratigraphic variations in sedimentary sequences for geomorphological applications are reviewed. The studies can generally be grouped into three main categories. The first includes studies where the variation of portable OSL reader luminescence signal intensities with depth are plotted to generate profiles that contextualise sediment stratigraphy. In the second group, portable OSL reader luminescence signal intensities are used to interpret sediment processes that shed light on depositional histories. In the last category, luminescence signals from the portable OSL reader are calibrated to approximate numerical burial ages of depositional units. The paper concludes with a discussion of possible future directions.

AB - The development of functional portable optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) readers over the last decade has provided practitioners with the capability to acquire luminescence signals from geological materials relatively rapidly, which allows for expedient preliminary chronostratigraphic insight when working with complex depositional systems of late Quaternary age. Typically, when using the portable OSL reader, infrared (IR) or blue post-IR OSL signals are acquired from bulk unprocessed materials, in contrast to regular luminescence dating which is usually based on measurements on pure quartz or feldspar mineral separates, or on select silt-sized polymineralic portions. To demonstrate the utility of portable OSL measurements, this paper outlines the basic features of portable OSL readers and their constraints. Afterwards, case studies in which the instrument has been used to elucidate cryptostratigraphic variations in sedimentary sequences for geomorphological applications are reviewed. The studies can generally be grouped into three main categories. The first includes studies where the variation of portable OSL reader luminescence signal intensities with depth are plotted to generate profiles that contextualise sediment stratigraphy. In the second group, portable OSL reader luminescence signal intensities are used to interpret sediment processes that shed light on depositional histories. In the last category, luminescence signals from the portable OSL reader are calibrated to approximate numerical burial ages of depositional units. The paper concludes with a discussion of possible future directions.

KW - Geomorphology

KW - Dating

KW - Landscape evolution

KW - Optically stimulated luminescence

KW - Portable OSL reader

KW - Chronology

U2 - 10.1002/esp.4975

DO - 10.1002/esp.4975

M3 - Article

VL - Early View

JO - Earth Surface Processes and Landforms

JF - Earth Surface Processes and Landforms

SN - 0197-9337

ER -

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