Skip to content

Research at St Andrews

The reach of gene-culture coevolution in animals

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

Standard

The reach of gene-culture coevolution in animals. / Whitehead, Hal; Laland, Kevin N.; Rendell, Luke; Thorogood, Rose; Whiten, Andrew.

In: Nature Communications, Vol. 10, 2405, 03.06.2019.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

Harvard

Whitehead, H, Laland, KN, Rendell, L, Thorogood, R & Whiten, A 2019, 'The reach of gene-culture coevolution in animals' Nature Communications, vol. 10, 2405. https://doi.org/10.1038/s41467-019-10293-y

APA

Whitehead, H., Laland, K. N., Rendell, L., Thorogood, R., & Whiten, A. (2019). The reach of gene-culture coevolution in animals. Nature Communications, 10, [2405]. https://doi.org/10.1038/s41467-019-10293-y

Vancouver

Whitehead H, Laland KN, Rendell L, Thorogood R, Whiten A. The reach of gene-culture coevolution in animals. Nature Communications. 2019 Jun 3;10. 2405. https://doi.org/10.1038/s41467-019-10293-y

Author

Whitehead, Hal ; Laland, Kevin N. ; Rendell, Luke ; Thorogood, Rose ; Whiten, Andrew. / The reach of gene-culture coevolution in animals. In: Nature Communications. 2019 ; Vol. 10.

Bibtex - Download

@article{5d457c10835845c4b24df0918f860c8e,
title = "The reach of gene-culture coevolution in animals",
abstract = "Culture (behaviour based on socially transmitted information) is present in diverse animal species, yet how it interacts with genetic evolution remains largely unexplored. Here, we review the evidence for gene–culture coevolution in animals, especially birds, cetaceans and primates. We describe how culture can relax or intensify selection under different circumstances, create new selection pressures by changing ecology or behaviour, and favour adaptations, including in other species. Finally, we illustrate how, through culturally mediated migration and assortative mating, culture can shape population genetic structure and diversity. This evidence suggests strongly that animal culture plays an important evolutionary role, and we encourage explicit analyses of gene–culture coevolution in nature.",
author = "Hal Whitehead and Laland, {Kevin N.} and Luke Rendell and Rose Thorogood and Andrew Whiten",
year = "2019",
month = "6",
day = "3",
doi = "10.1038/s41467-019-10293-y",
language = "English",
volume = "10",
journal = "Nature Communications",
issn = "2041-1723",
publisher = "Nature publishing group",

}

RIS (suitable for import to EndNote) - Download

TY - JOUR

T1 - The reach of gene-culture coevolution in animals

AU - Whitehead, Hal

AU - Laland, Kevin N.

AU - Rendell, Luke

AU - Thorogood, Rose

AU - Whiten, Andrew

PY - 2019/6/3

Y1 - 2019/6/3

N2 - Culture (behaviour based on socially transmitted information) is present in diverse animal species, yet how it interacts with genetic evolution remains largely unexplored. Here, we review the evidence for gene–culture coevolution in animals, especially birds, cetaceans and primates. We describe how culture can relax or intensify selection under different circumstances, create new selection pressures by changing ecology or behaviour, and favour adaptations, including in other species. Finally, we illustrate how, through culturally mediated migration and assortative mating, culture can shape population genetic structure and diversity. This evidence suggests strongly that animal culture plays an important evolutionary role, and we encourage explicit analyses of gene–culture coevolution in nature.

AB - Culture (behaviour based on socially transmitted information) is present in diverse animal species, yet how it interacts with genetic evolution remains largely unexplored. Here, we review the evidence for gene–culture coevolution in animals, especially birds, cetaceans and primates. We describe how culture can relax or intensify selection under different circumstances, create new selection pressures by changing ecology or behaviour, and favour adaptations, including in other species. Finally, we illustrate how, through culturally mediated migration and assortative mating, culture can shape population genetic structure and diversity. This evidence suggests strongly that animal culture plays an important evolutionary role, and we encourage explicit analyses of gene–culture coevolution in nature.

U2 - 10.1038/s41467-019-10293-y

DO - 10.1038/s41467-019-10293-y

M3 - Review article

VL - 10

JO - Nature Communications

T2 - Nature Communications

JF - Nature Communications

SN - 2041-1723

M1 - 2405

ER -

Related by author

  1. Experimental evidence for the co-evolution of hominin tool-making teaching and language

    Morgan, T. J. H., Uomini, N. T., Rendell, L. E., Chouinard-Thuly, L., Street, S. E., Lewis, H. M., Cross, C. P., Evans, C., Kearney, R., de la Torre, I., Whiten, A. & Laland, K. N., 13 Jan 2015, In : Nature Communications. 6, 8 p., 6029.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

  2. Animal cultures matter for conservation

    Brakes, P., Dall, S. R. X., Aplin, L. M., Bearhop, S., Carroll, E. L., Ciucci, P., Fishlock, V., Ford, J. K. B., Garland, E. C., Keith, S. A., McGregor, P. K., Mesnick, S. L., Noad, M. J., Notarbartolo di Sciara, G., Robbins, M. M., Simmonds, M. P., Spina, F., Thornton, A., Wade, P. R., Whiting, M. J. & 5 othersWilliams, J., Rendell, L., Whitehead, H., Whiten, A. & Rutz, C., 8 Mar 2019, In : Science. 363, 6431, p. 1032-1034 5 p.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

  3. Social learning strategies: bridge-building between fields

    Kendal, R., Boogert, N., Rendell, L., Laland, K. N., Webster, M. & Jones, P., Jul 2018, In : Trends in Cognitive Sciences. 22, 7, p. 651-665 15 p.

    Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

  4. Innovation and cumulative culture through tweaks and leaps in online programming contests

    Miu, E., Gulley, N., Laland, K. N. & Rendell, L., 13 Jun 2018, In : Nature Communications. 9, 8 p., 2321.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

  5. Social Evolution and the collective brain

    Laland, K. N. & Rendell, L., Sep 2017, In : Trends in Ecology and Evolution. 32, 9, p. 625-626 2 p.

    Research output: Contribution to journalBook/Film/Article review

Related by journal

  1. Nature Communications (Journal)

    Andy Gardner (Reviewer)
    Feb 2018

    Activity: Publication peer-review and editorial work typesPeer review of manuscripts

Related by journal

  1. An oxalate cathode for lithium ion batteries with combined cationic and polyanionic redox

    Yao, W., Armstrong, A. R., Zhou, X., Sougrati, M-T., Kidkhunthod, P., Tunmee, S., Sun, C., Sattayaporn, S., Lightfoot, P., Ji, B., Jiang, C., Wu, N., Tang, Y. & Cheng, H-M., 2 Aug 2019, In : Nature Communications. 10, 9 p., 3483.

    Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

  2. Enhanced carbon dioxide electrolysis at redox manipulated interfaces

    Wang, W., Gan, L., Lemmon, J. P., Chen, F., Irvine, J. T. S. & Xie, K., 4 Apr 2019, In : Nature Communications. 10, 10 p., 1550.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

  3. Fluidal pyroclasts reveal the intensity of peralkaline rhyolite pumice cone eruptions

    Clarke, B., Calder, E. S., Dessalegn, F., Fontijn, K., Cortés, J. A., Naylor, M., Butler, I., Hutchison, W. & Yirgu, G., 1 May 2019, In : Nature Communications. 10, 10 p.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

  4. Hidden structural and chemical order controls lithium transport in cation-disordered oxides for rechargeable batteries

    Ji, H., Urban, A., Kitchaev, D. A., Kwon, D-H., Artrith, N., Ophus, C., Huang, W., Cai, Z., Shi, T., Kim, J. C., Kim, H. & Ceder, G., 5 Feb 2019, In : Nature Communications. 10, 9 p., 592.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

  5. Highly emissive excitons with reduced exchange energy in thermally activated delayed fluorescent molecules

    Pershin, A., Hall, D., Lemaur, V., Sancho-Garcia, J-C., Muccioli, L., Zysman-Colman, E., Beljonne, D. & Olivier, Y., 5 Feb 2019, In : Nature Communications. 10, 5 p., 597.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

ID: 259062548