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The reliability of a model influences 14-month-olds' imitation

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The reliability of a model influences 14-month-olds' imitation. / Zmyj, Norbert; Buttelmann, David; Carpenter, Malinda; Daum, Moritz M.

In: Journal of Experimental Child Psychology, Vol. 106, No. 4, 08.2010, p. 208-220.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Harvard

Zmyj, N, Buttelmann, D, Carpenter, M & Daum, MM 2010, 'The reliability of a model influences 14-month-olds' imitation', Journal of Experimental Child Psychology, vol. 106, no. 4, pp. 208-220. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jecp.2010.03.002

APA

Zmyj, N., Buttelmann, D., Carpenter, M., & Daum, M. M. (2010). The reliability of a model influences 14-month-olds' imitation. Journal of Experimental Child Psychology, 106(4), 208-220. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jecp.2010.03.002

Vancouver

Zmyj N, Buttelmann D, Carpenter M, Daum MM. The reliability of a model influences 14-month-olds' imitation. Journal of Experimental Child Psychology. 2010 Aug;106(4):208-220. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jecp.2010.03.002

Author

Zmyj, Norbert ; Buttelmann, David ; Carpenter, Malinda ; Daum, Moritz M. / The reliability of a model influences 14-month-olds' imitation. In: Journal of Experimental Child Psychology. 2010 ; Vol. 106, No. 4. pp. 208-220.

Bibtex - Download

@article{8d327dc690ea4da98bfb3170d3361dcd,
title = "The reliability of a model influences 14-month-olds' imitation",
abstract = "Human infants have an enormous amount to learn from others to become full-fledged members of their culture. Thus, it is important that they learn from reliable, rather than unreliable, models. In two experiments, we investigated whether 14-month-olds (a) imitate instrumental actions and (b) adopt the individual preferences of a model differently depending on the model's previous reliability. Infants were shown a series of videos in which a model acted on familiar objects either competently or incompetently. They then watched as the same model demonstrated a novel action on an object (imitation task) and preferentially chose one of two novel objects (preference task). Infants' imitation of the novel action was influenced by the model's previous reliability; they copied the action more often when the model had been reliable. However, their preference for one of the novel objects was not influenced by the model's previous reliability. We conclude that already by 14 months of age, infants discriminate between reliable and unreliable models when learning novel actions. (C) 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.",
keywords = "Imitation, Selective learning, Preference, Reliability, Infants, RATIONAL IMITATION, 12-MONTH-OLD INFANTS, 18-MONTH-OLDS, CREDIBILITY, IGNORANT, SPEAKERS, WORDS, PEER, CUES",
author = "Norbert Zmyj and David Buttelmann and Malinda Carpenter and Daum, {Moritz M.}",
year = "2010",
month = aug,
doi = "10.1016/j.jecp.2010.03.002",
language = "English",
volume = "106",
pages = "208--220",
journal = "Journal of Experimental Child Psychology",
issn = "0022-0965",
publisher = "Academic Press Inc.",
number = "4",

}

RIS (suitable for import to EndNote) - Download

TY - JOUR

T1 - The reliability of a model influences 14-month-olds' imitation

AU - Zmyj, Norbert

AU - Buttelmann, David

AU - Carpenter, Malinda

AU - Daum, Moritz M.

PY - 2010/8

Y1 - 2010/8

N2 - Human infants have an enormous amount to learn from others to become full-fledged members of their culture. Thus, it is important that they learn from reliable, rather than unreliable, models. In two experiments, we investigated whether 14-month-olds (a) imitate instrumental actions and (b) adopt the individual preferences of a model differently depending on the model's previous reliability. Infants were shown a series of videos in which a model acted on familiar objects either competently or incompetently. They then watched as the same model demonstrated a novel action on an object (imitation task) and preferentially chose one of two novel objects (preference task). Infants' imitation of the novel action was influenced by the model's previous reliability; they copied the action more often when the model had been reliable. However, their preference for one of the novel objects was not influenced by the model's previous reliability. We conclude that already by 14 months of age, infants discriminate between reliable and unreliable models when learning novel actions. (C) 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

AB - Human infants have an enormous amount to learn from others to become full-fledged members of their culture. Thus, it is important that they learn from reliable, rather than unreliable, models. In two experiments, we investigated whether 14-month-olds (a) imitate instrumental actions and (b) adopt the individual preferences of a model differently depending on the model's previous reliability. Infants were shown a series of videos in which a model acted on familiar objects either competently or incompetently. They then watched as the same model demonstrated a novel action on an object (imitation task) and preferentially chose one of two novel objects (preference task). Infants' imitation of the novel action was influenced by the model's previous reliability; they copied the action more often when the model had been reliable. However, their preference for one of the novel objects was not influenced by the model's previous reliability. We conclude that already by 14 months of age, infants discriminate between reliable and unreliable models when learning novel actions. (C) 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

KW - Imitation

KW - Selective learning

KW - Preference

KW - Reliability

KW - Infants

KW - RATIONAL IMITATION

KW - 12-MONTH-OLD INFANTS

KW - 18-MONTH-OLDS

KW - CREDIBILITY

KW - IGNORANT

KW - SPEAKERS

KW - WORDS

KW - PEER

KW - CUES

U2 - 10.1016/j.jecp.2010.03.002

DO - 10.1016/j.jecp.2010.03.002

M3 - Article

VL - 106

SP - 208

EP - 220

JO - Journal of Experimental Child Psychology

JF - Journal of Experimental Child Psychology

SN - 0022-0965

IS - 4

ER -

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