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The scope of culture in chimpanzees, humans and ancestral apes

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The scope of culture in chimpanzees, humans and ancestral apes. / Whiten, Andrew.

In: Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society. B, Biological Sciences, Vol. 366, No. 1567, 12.04.2011, p. 997-1007.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

Harvard

Whiten, A 2011, 'The scope of culture in chimpanzees, humans and ancestral apes' Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society. B, Biological Sciences, vol 366, no. 1567, pp. 997-1007. DOI: 10.1098/rstb.2010.0334

APA

Whiten, A. (2011). The scope of culture in chimpanzees, humans and ancestral apes. Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society. B, Biological Sciences, 366(1567), 997-1007. DOI: 10.1098/rstb.2010.0334

Vancouver

Whiten A. The scope of culture in chimpanzees, humans and ancestral apes. Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society. B, Biological Sciences. 2011 Apr 12;366(1567):997-1007. Available from, DOI: 10.1098/rstb.2010.0334

Author

Whiten, Andrew / The scope of culture in chimpanzees, humans and ancestral apes.

In: Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society. B, Biological Sciences, Vol. 366, No. 1567, 12.04.2011, p. 997-1007.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

Bibtex - Download

@article{b3e904d675394e74bfe5f50b1368c9ab,
title = "The scope of culture in chimpanzees, humans and ancestral apes",
abstract = "More studies have focused on aspects of chimpanzee behaviour and cognition relevant to the evolution of culture than on any other species except our own. Accordingly, analysis of the features shared by chimpanzees and humans is here used to infer the scope of cultural phenomena in our last common ancestor, at the same time clarifying the nature of the special characteristics that advanced further in the hominin line. To do this, culture is broken down into three major aspects: the large scale, population-level patterning of traditions; social learning mechanisms; and the behavioural and cognitive contents of culture. Each of these is further dissected into subcomponents. Shared features, as well as differences, are identified in as many as a dozen of these, offering a case study for the comparative analysis of culture across animal taxa and a deeper understanding of the roots of our own cultural capacities.",
keywords = "culture, traditions, cultural evolution, social learning, apes, chimpanzees, TOOL-USE, PAN-TROGLODYTES, CUMULATIVE CULTURE, WILD CHIMPANZEES, TRANSMISSION, EVOLUTION, CONFORMITY, TRADITIONS, IMITATION, CHILDREN",
author = "Andrew Whiten",
year = "2011",
month = "4",
doi = "10.1098/rstb.2010.0334",
volume = "366",
pages = "997--1007",
journal = "Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society. B, Biological Sciences",
issn = "0962-8436",
publisher = "ROYAL SOC",
number = "1567",

}

RIS (suitable for import to EndNote) - Download

TY - JOUR

T1 - The scope of culture in chimpanzees, humans and ancestral apes

AU - Whiten,Andrew

PY - 2011/4/12

Y1 - 2011/4/12

N2 - More studies have focused on aspects of chimpanzee behaviour and cognition relevant to the evolution of culture than on any other species except our own. Accordingly, analysis of the features shared by chimpanzees and humans is here used to infer the scope of cultural phenomena in our last common ancestor, at the same time clarifying the nature of the special characteristics that advanced further in the hominin line. To do this, culture is broken down into three major aspects: the large scale, population-level patterning of traditions; social learning mechanisms; and the behavioural and cognitive contents of culture. Each of these is further dissected into subcomponents. Shared features, as well as differences, are identified in as many as a dozen of these, offering a case study for the comparative analysis of culture across animal taxa and a deeper understanding of the roots of our own cultural capacities.

AB - More studies have focused on aspects of chimpanzee behaviour and cognition relevant to the evolution of culture than on any other species except our own. Accordingly, analysis of the features shared by chimpanzees and humans is here used to infer the scope of cultural phenomena in our last common ancestor, at the same time clarifying the nature of the special characteristics that advanced further in the hominin line. To do this, culture is broken down into three major aspects: the large scale, population-level patterning of traditions; social learning mechanisms; and the behavioural and cognitive contents of culture. Each of these is further dissected into subcomponents. Shared features, as well as differences, are identified in as many as a dozen of these, offering a case study for the comparative analysis of culture across animal taxa and a deeper understanding of the roots of our own cultural capacities.

KW - culture

KW - traditions

KW - cultural evolution

KW - social learning

KW - apes

KW - chimpanzees

KW - TOOL-USE

KW - PAN-TROGLODYTES

KW - CUMULATIVE CULTURE

KW - WILD CHIMPANZEES

KW - TRANSMISSION

KW - EVOLUTION

KW - CONFORMITY

KW - TRADITIONS

KW - IMITATION

KW - CHILDREN

U2 - 10.1098/rstb.2010.0334

DO - 10.1098/rstb.2010.0334

M3 - Review article

VL - 366

SP - 997

EP - 1007

JO - Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society. B, Biological Sciences

T2 - Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society. B, Biological Sciences

JF - Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society. B, Biological Sciences

SN - 0962-8436

IS - 1567

ER -

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ID: 6066509