Skip to content

Research at St Andrews

The sensitivity of primate STS neurons to walking sequences and to the degree of articulation in static images

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Author(s)

Nicholas Edward Barraclough, D-K Xiao, Michael William Oram, David Ian Perrett

School/Research organisations

Abstract

We readily use the form of human figures to determine if they are moving. Human figures that have arms and legs outstretched (articulated) appear to be moving more than figures where the arms and legs are near the body (standing). We tested whether neurons in the macaque monkey superior temporal sulcus (STS), a region known to be involved in processing social stimuli, were sensitive to the degree of articulation of a static human figure. Additionally, we tested sensitivity to the same stimuli within forward and backward walking sequences. We found that 57% of cells that responded to the static image of a human figure was also sensitive to the degree of articulation of the figure. Some cells displayed selective responses for articulated postures, while others (in equal numbers) displayed selective responses for standing postures. Cells selective for static images of articulated figures were more likely to respond to movies of walking forwards than walking backwards. Cells selective for static images of standing figures were more likely to respond to movies of walking backwards than forwards. An association between form sensitivity and walking sensitivity could be consistent with an interpretation that cell responses to articulated figures act as an implied motion signal.

Close

Details

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)135-148
JournalProgress in Brain Research
Volume154
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2006

    Research areas

  • motion, implied motion, form, integration, temporal cortex, action, SUPERIOR TEMPORAL SULCUS, HUMAN VISUAL-CORTEX, MACAQUE MONKEY, IMPLIED MOTION, BIOLOGICAL MOTION, OBJECT RECOGNITION, POLYSENSORY AREA, NEURAL MECHANISMS, PERCEPTION, INTEGRATION

Discover related content
Find related publications, people, projects and more using interactive charts.

View graph of relations

Related by author

  1. Implied motion activation in cortical area MT can be explained by visual low-level features

    Lorteije, J. A. M., Barraclough, N. E., Jellema, T., Raemaekers, M., Duijnhouwer, J., Xiao, D., Oram, M. W., Lankheet, M. J. M., Perrett, D. I. & van Wezel, R. J. A., Jun 2011, In : Journal of Cognitive Neuroscience. 23, 6, p. 1533-1548 16 p.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

  2. Visual adaptation to goal-directed hand actions

    Barraclough, N. E., Keith, R. H., Xiao, D., Oram, M. W. & Perrett, D. I., Sep 2009, In : Journal of Cognitive Neuroscience. 21, 9, p. 1805-1819

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

  3. Seeing the future: Natural image sequences produce “anticipatory” neuronal activity and bias perceptual report

    Perrett, D. I., Xiao, D., Barraclough, N. E., Keysers, C. & Oram, M. W., 2009, In : The Quarterly Journal of Experimental Psychology. 62, 11, p. 2081-2104

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

  4. Social perception from static and dynamic visual information

    Perrett, D. I., Xiao, D., Jellema, T., Barraclough, N. & Oram, M. W., 2006, In : Perception. 35, ECVP Abstract Supplement, p. 120-120 1 p.

    Research output: Contribution to journalAbstract

  5. Receptive fields as prediction devices: A comparison of cell tuning to single images and to natural image sequences in temporal cortex

    Perrett, D. I., Xiao, D., Barraclough, N. E., Keysers, C. & Oram, M. W., 2006, In : Journal of Psychophysiology. 20, 4, p. 330-330 1 p.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Related by journal

  1. The Challenges of long-distance axon regeneration in the injured CNS

    Chew, D. J., Fawcett, J. W. & Andrews, M. R., Dec 2012, In : Progress in Brain Research. 201, p. 253-294 42 p.

    Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

  2. Rapid serial visual presentation for the determination of neural selectivity in area STSa

    Foldiak, P., Xioa, D. K., Keysers, C., Edwards, R. & Perrett, D. I., Jan 2004, In : Progress in Brain Research. 144, p. 107-116 10 p.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

  3. Redox properties of the flavin cofactor of monoamine oxidases A and B and their relationship to the kinetic mechanism

    Ramsay, R. R., Sablin, S. O. & Singer, T. P., 1 Jan 1995, In : Progress in Brain Research. 106, C, p. 33-39 7 p.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

ID: 375041

Top