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The technical reasoning hypothesis does not rule out the potential key roles of imitation and working memory for CTC

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Author(s)

Alba Motes-Rodrigo, Eva Reindl, Elisa Bandini

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Abstract

To support their claim for technical reasoning skills rather than imitation as the key for cumulative technological culture (CTC), Osiurak and Reynaud argue that chimpanzees can imitate mechanical actions, but do not have CTC. They also state that an increase in working memory in human evolution could not have been a key driver of CTC. We discuss why we disagree with these claims.

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Details

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)e173
JournalThe Behavioral and brain sciences
Volume43
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 10 Aug 2020

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