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The use of natural microphytobenthic assemblages as laboratory model systems

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

DOI

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The use of natural microphytobenthic assemblages as laboratory model systems. / Defew, Emma Clare; Paterson, David Maxwell; Hagerthey, SE.

In: Marine Ecology Progress Series, Vol. 237, 18.07.2002, p. 15-25.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Harvard

Defew, EC, Paterson, DM & Hagerthey, SE 2002, 'The use of natural microphytobenthic assemblages as laboratory model systems', Marine Ecology Progress Series, vol. 237, pp. 15-25. https://doi.org/10.3354/meps237015

APA

Defew, E. C., Paterson, D. M., & Hagerthey, SE. (2002). The use of natural microphytobenthic assemblages as laboratory model systems. Marine Ecology Progress Series, 237, 15-25. https://doi.org/10.3354/meps237015

Vancouver

Defew EC, Paterson DM, Hagerthey SE. The use of natural microphytobenthic assemblages as laboratory model systems. Marine Ecology Progress Series. 2002 Jul 18;237:15-25. https://doi.org/10.3354/meps237015

Author

Defew, Emma Clare ; Paterson, David Maxwell ; Hagerthey, SE. / The use of natural microphytobenthic assemblages as laboratory model systems. In: Marine Ecology Progress Series. 2002 ; Vol. 237. pp. 15-25.

Bibtex - Download

@article{5594b78b0e11415eb0fa29c65b06cb63,
title = "The use of natural microphytobenthic assemblages as laboratory model systems",
abstract = "The use of complex species mixtures is becoming more common in laboratory investigations of ecological theory. Natural assemblages of microphytobenthos provide a model system of considerable species richness that can be examined and manipulated easily under laboratory conditions. However, the relative temporal stability of these assemblages maintained under laboratory conditions in terms of species composition and community metabolism is not known. This information is required before the results from model systems employing assemblages of microphytobenthos can be properly interpreted. Natural assemblages of microphytobenthos were sampled, prepared and incubated in the laboratory under light levels representative of those found in the literature. Analysis of microphytobenthic assemblage composition (gross community change); biomass (chlorophyll a), composition of pigments and photophysiological status were assessed after a 14 d period. No changes in species richness were found, whilst diversity declined from the initial field values, but were similar when compared between assemblages maintained at different light levels. Field assemblages contained greater numbers of larger diatoms compared to the cultured assemblages. Photophysiological responses were similar between the 2 light treatments, although signs of photophysiological stress were observed. It was therefore shown that estuarine microphytobenthic assemblages appear to possess a certain degree of inertia when brought from the field into the reduced light regime of a laboratory. Microphytobenthic assemblages therefore provide a useful experimental model with relevance to natural conditions.",
keywords = "microphytobenthos, laboratory culture, mixed assemblages, diatoms, species diversity, PHOTOSYNTHETIC ELECTRON-TRANSPORT, DIATOM SKELETONEMA-COSTATUM, CHLOROPHYLL FLUORESCENCE, EXOPOLYMER PRODUCTION, INTERTIDAL SEDIMENTS, NUTRIENT ENRICHMENT, BENTHIC MICROALGAE, BIODIVERSITY, COMMUNITIES, GROWTH",
author = "Defew, {Emma Clare} and Paterson, {David Maxwell} and SE Hagerthey",
year = "2002",
month = "7",
day = "18",
doi = "10.3354/meps237015",
language = "English",
volume = "237",
pages = "15--25",
journal = "Marine Ecology Progress Series",
issn = "0171-8630",
publisher = "Inter-Research",

}

RIS (suitable for import to EndNote) - Download

TY - JOUR

T1 - The use of natural microphytobenthic assemblages as laboratory model systems

AU - Defew, Emma Clare

AU - Paterson, David Maxwell

AU - Hagerthey, SE

PY - 2002/7/18

Y1 - 2002/7/18

N2 - The use of complex species mixtures is becoming more common in laboratory investigations of ecological theory. Natural assemblages of microphytobenthos provide a model system of considerable species richness that can be examined and manipulated easily under laboratory conditions. However, the relative temporal stability of these assemblages maintained under laboratory conditions in terms of species composition and community metabolism is not known. This information is required before the results from model systems employing assemblages of microphytobenthos can be properly interpreted. Natural assemblages of microphytobenthos were sampled, prepared and incubated in the laboratory under light levels representative of those found in the literature. Analysis of microphytobenthic assemblage composition (gross community change); biomass (chlorophyll a), composition of pigments and photophysiological status were assessed after a 14 d period. No changes in species richness were found, whilst diversity declined from the initial field values, but were similar when compared between assemblages maintained at different light levels. Field assemblages contained greater numbers of larger diatoms compared to the cultured assemblages. Photophysiological responses were similar between the 2 light treatments, although signs of photophysiological stress were observed. It was therefore shown that estuarine microphytobenthic assemblages appear to possess a certain degree of inertia when brought from the field into the reduced light regime of a laboratory. Microphytobenthic assemblages therefore provide a useful experimental model with relevance to natural conditions.

AB - The use of complex species mixtures is becoming more common in laboratory investigations of ecological theory. Natural assemblages of microphytobenthos provide a model system of considerable species richness that can be examined and manipulated easily under laboratory conditions. However, the relative temporal stability of these assemblages maintained under laboratory conditions in terms of species composition and community metabolism is not known. This information is required before the results from model systems employing assemblages of microphytobenthos can be properly interpreted. Natural assemblages of microphytobenthos were sampled, prepared and incubated in the laboratory under light levels representative of those found in the literature. Analysis of microphytobenthic assemblage composition (gross community change); biomass (chlorophyll a), composition of pigments and photophysiological status were assessed after a 14 d period. No changes in species richness were found, whilst diversity declined from the initial field values, but were similar when compared between assemblages maintained at different light levels. Field assemblages contained greater numbers of larger diatoms compared to the cultured assemblages. Photophysiological responses were similar between the 2 light treatments, although signs of photophysiological stress were observed. It was therefore shown that estuarine microphytobenthic assemblages appear to possess a certain degree of inertia when brought from the field into the reduced light regime of a laboratory. Microphytobenthic assemblages therefore provide a useful experimental model with relevance to natural conditions.

KW - microphytobenthos

KW - laboratory culture

KW - mixed assemblages

KW - diatoms

KW - species diversity

KW - PHOTOSYNTHETIC ELECTRON-TRANSPORT

KW - DIATOM SKELETONEMA-COSTATUM

KW - CHLOROPHYLL FLUORESCENCE

KW - EXOPOLYMER PRODUCTION

KW - INTERTIDAL SEDIMENTS

KW - NUTRIENT ENRICHMENT

KW - BENTHIC MICROALGAE

KW - BIODIVERSITY

KW - COMMUNITIES

KW - GROWTH

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0037130148&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.3354/meps237015

DO - 10.3354/meps237015

M3 - Article

VL - 237

SP - 15

EP - 25

JO - Marine Ecology Progress Series

JF - Marine Ecology Progress Series

SN - 0171-8630

ER -

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