Skip to content

Research at St Andrews

Three-year-olds' understanding of the consequences of joint commitments

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Standard

Three-year-olds' understanding of the consequences of joint commitments. / Graefenhain, Maria; Carpenter, Malinda; Tomasello, Michael.

In: PLoS One, Vol. 8, No. 9, e73039, 04.09.2013.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Harvard

Graefenhain, M, Carpenter, M & Tomasello, M 2013, 'Three-year-olds' understanding of the consequences of joint commitments', PLoS One, vol. 8, no. 9, e73039. https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0073039

APA

Graefenhain, M., Carpenter, M., & Tomasello, M. (2013). Three-year-olds' understanding of the consequences of joint commitments. PLoS One, 8(9), [e73039]. https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0073039

Vancouver

Graefenhain M, Carpenter M, Tomasello M. Three-year-olds' understanding of the consequences of joint commitments. PLoS One. 2013 Sep 4;8(9). e73039. https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0073039

Author

Graefenhain, Maria ; Carpenter, Malinda ; Tomasello, Michael. / Three-year-olds' understanding of the consequences of joint commitments. In: PLoS One. 2013 ; Vol. 8, No. 9.

Bibtex - Download

@article{a118579673e4466caeceb213ebd790a8,
title = "Three-year-olds' understanding of the consequences of joint commitments",
abstract = "Here we investigate the extent of children's understanding of the joint commitments inherent in joint activities. Three-year-old children either made a joint commitment to assemble a puzzle with a puppet partner, or else the child and puppet each assembled their own puzzle. Afterwards, children who had made the joint commitment were more likely to stop and wait for their partner on their way to fetch something, more likely to spontaneously help their partner when needed, and more likely to take over their partner's role when necessary. There was no clear difference in children's tendency to tattle on their partner's cheating behavior or their tendency to distribute rewards equally at the end. It thus appears that by 3 years of age making a joint commitment to act together with others is beginning to engender in children a {"}we{"}-intentionality which holds across at least most of the process of the joint activity until the shared goal is achieved, and which withstands at least some of the perturbations to the joint activity children experience.",
keywords = "YOUNG-CHILDREN, INDIVIDUAL-DIFFERENCES, SHARED INTENTION, COOPERATION, GOALS, GAMES, LIES, CHIMPANZEES, FAIRNESS, SIBLINGS",
author = "Maria Graefenhain and Malinda Carpenter and Michael Tomasello",
note = "No external funding has supported the current work.",
year = "2013",
month = sep,
day = "4",
doi = "10.1371/journal.pone.0073039",
language = "English",
volume = "8",
journal = "PLoS One",
issn = "1932-6203",
publisher = "Public Library of Science",
number = "9",

}

RIS (suitable for import to EndNote) - Download

TY - JOUR

T1 - Three-year-olds' understanding of the consequences of joint commitments

AU - Graefenhain, Maria

AU - Carpenter, Malinda

AU - Tomasello, Michael

N1 - No external funding has supported the current work.

PY - 2013/9/4

Y1 - 2013/9/4

N2 - Here we investigate the extent of children's understanding of the joint commitments inherent in joint activities. Three-year-old children either made a joint commitment to assemble a puzzle with a puppet partner, or else the child and puppet each assembled their own puzzle. Afterwards, children who had made the joint commitment were more likely to stop and wait for their partner on their way to fetch something, more likely to spontaneously help their partner when needed, and more likely to take over their partner's role when necessary. There was no clear difference in children's tendency to tattle on their partner's cheating behavior or their tendency to distribute rewards equally at the end. It thus appears that by 3 years of age making a joint commitment to act together with others is beginning to engender in children a "we"-intentionality which holds across at least most of the process of the joint activity until the shared goal is achieved, and which withstands at least some of the perturbations to the joint activity children experience.

AB - Here we investigate the extent of children's understanding of the joint commitments inherent in joint activities. Three-year-old children either made a joint commitment to assemble a puzzle with a puppet partner, or else the child and puppet each assembled their own puzzle. Afterwards, children who had made the joint commitment were more likely to stop and wait for their partner on their way to fetch something, more likely to spontaneously help their partner when needed, and more likely to take over their partner's role when necessary. There was no clear difference in children's tendency to tattle on their partner's cheating behavior or their tendency to distribute rewards equally at the end. It thus appears that by 3 years of age making a joint commitment to act together with others is beginning to engender in children a "we"-intentionality which holds across at least most of the process of the joint activity until the shared goal is achieved, and which withstands at least some of the perturbations to the joint activity children experience.

KW - YOUNG-CHILDREN

KW - INDIVIDUAL-DIFFERENCES

KW - SHARED INTENTION

KW - COOPERATION

KW - GOALS

KW - GAMES

KW - LIES

KW - CHIMPANZEES

KW - FAIRNESS

KW - SIBLINGS

U2 - 10.1371/journal.pone.0073039

DO - 10.1371/journal.pone.0073039

M3 - Article

VL - 8

JO - PLoS One

JF - PLoS One

SN - 1932-6203

IS - 9

M1 - e73039

ER -

Related by author

  1. Young children share more under time pressure than after a delay

    Ploetner, M., Hepach, R., Over, H., Carpenter, M. & Tomasello, M., 16 Mar 2021, In: PLoS One. 16, 3, 10 p., e0248121.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

  2. Common knowledge that help is needed increases helping behavior in children

    Siposova, B., Grueneisen, S., Helming, K., Tomasello, M. & Carpenter, M., Jan 2021, In: Journal of Experimental Child Psychology. 201, 104973.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

  3. A new look at joint attention and common knowledge

    Siposova, B. & Carpenter, M., Aug 2019, In: Cognition. 189, p. 260-274 15 p.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

  4. Communicative eye contact signals a commitment to cooperate for young children

    Siposova, B., Tomasello, M. & Carpenter, M., Oct 2018, In: Cognition. 179, p. 192-201

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

  5. Selective copying of the majority suggests children are broadly "optimal-" rather than "over-" imitators

    Evans, C. L., Laland, K. N., Carpenter, M. & Kendal, R. L., 29 Aug 2018, In: Developmental Science. 21, 5, e12637.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Related by journal

  1. PLoS ONE (Journal)

    Joanna Louise Kershaw (Reviewer)

    18 Mar 2019

    Activity: Publication peer-review and editorial work typesPeer review of manuscripts

  2. PLoS One (Journal)

    Paula Jean Miles (Member of editorial board)

    2019

    Activity: Publication peer-review and editorial work typesPeer review of manuscripts

  3. PLoS ONE (Journal)

    Catharine Penelope Cross (Member of editorial board)

    1 Sep 2018 → …

    Activity: Publication peer-review and editorial work typesEditor of research journal

  4. PLoS ONE (Journal)

    Will Cresswell (Reviewer)

    23 May 2018

    Activity: Publication peer-review and editorial work typesPeer review of manuscripts

  5. PLoS ONE (Journal)

    Barbara Dritschel (Member of editorial board)

    May 2018 → …

    Activity: Publication peer-review and editorial work typesEditor of research journal

Related by journal

  1. Ecosystem engineers drive differing microbial community composition in intertidal estuarine sediments

    Wyness, A. J., Fortune, I., Blight, A. J., Browne, P., Hartley, M., Holden, M. & Paterson, D. M., 19 Feb 2021, In: PLoS ONE. 16, 2, 20 p., e0240952.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

  2. Performance evaluation of survival regression models in analysing Swedish dental implant complication data with frailty

    Fagbamigbe, A. F., Karlsson, K., Derks, J. & Petzold, M., 7 Jan 2021, In: PLoS ONE. 16, 1, 16 p., e0245111.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

  3. Young children share more under time pressure than after a delay

    Ploetner, M., Hepach, R., Over, H., Carpenter, M. & Tomasello, M., 16 Mar 2021, In: PLoS One. 16, 3, 10 p., e0248121.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

  4. Are in vitro and in silico approaches used appropriately for animal-based major depressive disorder research?

    Carvalho, C., Varela, S. A. M., Marques, T. A., Knight, A. & Vicente, L., 24 Jun 2020, In: PLoS ONE. 15, 6, 6 p., e0233954.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

  5. Artists on the edge of the world: an integrated approach to the study of Magdalenian engraved stone plaquettes from Jersey (Channel Islands)

    Bello, S. M., Blinkhorn, E., Needham, A., Bates, M., Duffy, S., Little, A., Pope, M., Scott, B., Shaw, A., Welch, M. D., Kinnaird, T., Millar, L., Robinson, R. & Conneller, C., 19 Aug 2020, In: PLoS ONE. 15, 8, 40 p., e0236875.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

ID: 78730804

Top