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'Tossing and turning your booke upside downe': The Trimming of Thomas Nashe, Cambridge, and scholarly reading

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'Tossing and turning your booke upside downe' : The Trimming of Thomas Nashe, Cambridge, and scholarly reading. / Hasler, Rebecca.

In: Renaissance Studies, Vol. In press, 20.08.2018.

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Harvard

Hasler, R 2018, ''Tossing and turning your booke upside downe': The Trimming of Thomas Nashe, Cambridge, and scholarly reading', Renaissance Studies, vol. In press. https://doi.org/10.1111/rest.12504

APA

Hasler, R. (2018). 'Tossing and turning your booke upside downe': The Trimming of Thomas Nashe, Cambridge, and scholarly reading. Renaissance Studies, In press. https://doi.org/10.1111/rest.12504

Vancouver

Hasler R. 'Tossing and turning your booke upside downe': The Trimming of Thomas Nashe, Cambridge, and scholarly reading. Renaissance Studies. 2018 Aug 20;In press. https://doi.org/10.1111/rest.12504

Author

Hasler, Rebecca. / 'Tossing and turning your booke upside downe' : The Trimming of Thomas Nashe, Cambridge, and scholarly reading. In: Renaissance Studies. 2018 ; Vol. In press.

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@article{3556553be7fd4577aef44260d31bcca9,
title = "'Tossing and turning your booke upside downe': The Trimming of Thomas Nashe, Cambridge, and scholarly reading",
abstract = "This article explores the distinctive culture of critical reading based around the University of Cambridge in the 1590s. Drawing upon new evidence that The Trimming of Thomas Nashe (1597) was produced by a Cambridge stationer for an audience of Cambridge scholars, it reconstructs the literary values of this community. The Trimming parodies Nashe's Have With You to Saffron‐Walden (1596). Its purported author – Richard Lichfield – draws upon his close reading of Have With You to attack Nashe by imitating his style. Similarly, the Parnassus Plays – which were performed at St John's College, Cambridge, between 1598 and 1601 – allude to the works of Nashe and Lichfield, and offer a comparable appraisal of contemporary literature. By unravelling the connections between Nashe, Lichfield, and the Parnassus Plays, this article demonstrates that some writers and stationers marketed their works to a specifically scholarly audience. These scholars used critical reading to reinforce a sense of community that was characterized by their perceived social and educational superiority to other readers, and that responded to their insecurities regarding the role of professional writers in the Elizabethan book trade. ",
keywords = "Thomas Nashe, Cambridge, Early Modern print, Parnassus Plays, Gabriel Harvey",
author = "Rebecca Hasler",
note = "This research was undertaken during the course of a SGSAH AHRC studentship",
year = "2018",
month = aug,
day = "20",
doi = "10.1111/rest.12504",
language = "English",
volume = "In press",
journal = "Renaissance Studies",
issn = "0269-1213",
publisher = "Wiley-Blackwell",

}

RIS (suitable for import to EndNote) - Download

TY - JOUR

T1 - 'Tossing and turning your booke upside downe'

T2 - The Trimming of Thomas Nashe, Cambridge, and scholarly reading

AU - Hasler, Rebecca

N1 - This research was undertaken during the course of a SGSAH AHRC studentship

PY - 2018/8/20

Y1 - 2018/8/20

N2 - This article explores the distinctive culture of critical reading based around the University of Cambridge in the 1590s. Drawing upon new evidence that The Trimming of Thomas Nashe (1597) was produced by a Cambridge stationer for an audience of Cambridge scholars, it reconstructs the literary values of this community. The Trimming parodies Nashe's Have With You to Saffron‐Walden (1596). Its purported author – Richard Lichfield – draws upon his close reading of Have With You to attack Nashe by imitating his style. Similarly, the Parnassus Plays – which were performed at St John's College, Cambridge, between 1598 and 1601 – allude to the works of Nashe and Lichfield, and offer a comparable appraisal of contemporary literature. By unravelling the connections between Nashe, Lichfield, and the Parnassus Plays, this article demonstrates that some writers and stationers marketed their works to a specifically scholarly audience. These scholars used critical reading to reinforce a sense of community that was characterized by their perceived social and educational superiority to other readers, and that responded to their insecurities regarding the role of professional writers in the Elizabethan book trade.

AB - This article explores the distinctive culture of critical reading based around the University of Cambridge in the 1590s. Drawing upon new evidence that The Trimming of Thomas Nashe (1597) was produced by a Cambridge stationer for an audience of Cambridge scholars, it reconstructs the literary values of this community. The Trimming parodies Nashe's Have With You to Saffron‐Walden (1596). Its purported author – Richard Lichfield – draws upon his close reading of Have With You to attack Nashe by imitating his style. Similarly, the Parnassus Plays – which were performed at St John's College, Cambridge, between 1598 and 1601 – allude to the works of Nashe and Lichfield, and offer a comparable appraisal of contemporary literature. By unravelling the connections between Nashe, Lichfield, and the Parnassus Plays, this article demonstrates that some writers and stationers marketed their works to a specifically scholarly audience. These scholars used critical reading to reinforce a sense of community that was characterized by their perceived social and educational superiority to other readers, and that responded to their insecurities regarding the role of professional writers in the Elizabethan book trade.

KW - Thomas Nashe

KW - Cambridge

KW - Early Modern print

KW - Parnassus Plays

KW - Gabriel Harvey

U2 - 10.1111/rest.12504

DO - 10.1111/rest.12504

M3 - Article

VL - In press

JO - Renaissance Studies

JF - Renaissance Studies

SN - 0269-1213

ER -

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